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QSIMDO
05-24-2013, 02:22 PM
This may be belt & suspenders but overkill is just right for me.

I made a bushing to decrease the axle bore on a motorcycle fork slider and I've got .0015" interference fit.
Is that too tight to use Loctite 603? (The slider is cast aluminum and the bushing is 6061)

They give specs for how much of a gap it'll function with but they probably never considered a guy like me would buy the stuff.

A.K. Boomer
05-24-2013, 02:39 PM
What size is the bushing?

QSIMDO
05-24-2013, 03:05 PM
OD is .7515". ID is .667".
1.125" long

Davidhcnc
05-24-2013, 03:33 PM
...I would use loctite or an interference fit, but not both.

interested to hear what others think.

topct
05-24-2013, 03:35 PM
...I would use loctite or an interference fit, but not both.

interested to hear what others think.

Agree.

Willy
05-24-2013, 03:43 PM
I agree with David. With an interference fit where would that leave the loctite?
It needs a gap in order to function, without the gap there is no loctite.

QSIMDO
05-24-2013, 03:54 PM
Done and done.
Thanks!

dfw5914
05-24-2013, 04:08 PM
I agree with David. With an interference fit where would that leave the loctite?
It needs a gap in order to function, without the gap there is no loctite. It's only a press fit on average, there will be plenty of tiny voids for the Loctite to fill. The Loctite will make for better retention.

Krunch
05-24-2013, 04:31 PM
If you have the energy to do this, register to post over at ADVrider.com and go to the "Garage" sub-forum and look for the "Loctite" thread ... there's a member there named "Dirty Sanchez" who is a Loctite rep, who apparently monitors the thread and answers all questions related to Loctite and motorcycles...and your question sounds like it's right up his alley.

Mark Rand
05-24-2013, 05:38 PM
From Loctite's 603 data sheet:-

"4. For Press Fitted Assemblies, apply adhesive thoroughly
to both bond surfaces and assemble at high press on
rates.
5. For Shrink Fitted Assemblies the adhesive should be
coated onto the pin, the collar should then be heated to
create sufficient clearance for free assembly."

Ed P
05-26-2013, 07:48 AM
Don't forget the Loctite primer with an aluminum to aluminum bond, otherwise you're wasting your time. Aluminum is considered an "inactive" material.

Ed P

QSIMDO
05-26-2013, 08:56 AM
Well...I ended up applying some anyway, mostly because I had to remove and install the bushing enough times that it was almost a slip fit by the time I was done.

Did NOT know about the primer, but the bushing is captured by a larger diameter on the axle on one side and a nut and washer on the other so it'll be fine.

Thanks all, as always I learned things.

Mike279
05-28-2013, 10:27 AM
Loctite being anerobic works only when you take the air away. That is why the bottles or tubes are never full. Pressing a part together will not remove all the loctite. The primer/accelerator gives a faster setup and back to service time. I used to wait 24 hours for red to setup on parts that had a lot of vibration. That gave the best service life. Mike

Ed P
05-29-2013, 08:44 AM
Loctite being anerobic works only when you take the air away. That is why the bottles or tubes are never full.

A very common misconception. The adhesive does react when there is no air, *and* in the presence of a catalyst. That catalyst is the metal. Sealing it up in a plastic bottle without air will not cause a reaction. It must have no air *and* be in contact with an *active* metal (or inactive metal and the primer).

Ed P

vpt
05-29-2013, 09:11 AM
When I was assembling the outboard pictured below I made a mistake and didn't use a primer for the anaerobic sealant between the two cases. I asked when buying the loctite if I needed a primer (which they didn't have on the shelf) and was told no, but then I see it mentioned in other places. I wish I would have found it and used it but in the end I didn't. The motor is on its third running season now and no problems but to this day it still bothers me. I don't see any case leaks yet either.

http://img202.imageshack.us/img202/2271/60hpevinrude002.jpg

Doozer
05-29-2013, 11:50 AM
A very common misconception. The adhesive does react when there is no air, *and* in the presence of a catalyst. That catalyst is the metal. Sealing it up in a plastic bottle without air will not cause a reaction. It must have no air *and* be in contact with an *active* metal (or inactive metal and the primer).

Ed P

How do you explain Loctite hardening in the plastic bottle then?

--Doozer

Rustybolt
05-29-2013, 01:21 PM
Andy.
As long as the surfaces are clean and free of oil you'll be fine.

Doozer.
Which loctite? We have the red for years in an unsealed bottle and it never hardens.

Paul Alciatore
05-29-2013, 02:10 PM
How do you explain Loctite hardening in the plastic bottle then?

--Doozer

???

If the bottles are not full from the factory, as most bottles are anyway, deliberate or not, then how do you get a bottle that has no air. Did you take a second bottle and use it to fill the first to the brim. And, does even that remove ALL air from the bottle. It would seems to me that you would need to submerge a bottle in the fluid and screw the cap on while it is submerged to completely remove all the air from the bottle.

If the bottle had air in it and it hardened, then you have no argument as that air, by your theory, should have prevented if from hardening. And it would not be the lack of air that would have caused it to harden.

I would suggest that if Loctite hardened in the bottle, then perhaps the cap was left off and evaporation caused it to thicken or even harden. This would seem to be the most likely explanation.

dian
05-29-2013, 04:21 PM
i have loctite red about 30 years old and still use it.

Doozer
05-29-2013, 04:30 PM
Ah, I looked at the bottle,
Someone had been using a 4-40 screw to plug the tip
and prevent spillage. I guess the steel screw "kicked off"
the reaction. I guess it is true, Loctite needs metal to
harden. I asked a rep once what the primer was.
He said it contained a copper oxide which kick starts
the hardening. He also says it tastes sweet because
it contains saccharin. Just like the artificial sweetener.
He said he uses Loctite in his coffee around the office.
I say he is full of shlt.
--Doozer

vpt
05-29-2013, 07:07 PM
Some loctite does smell good!

Paul Alciatore
05-29-2013, 11:49 PM
Doozer,

Thanks for that. Fell over laughing. I was trying to figure out how some metal could have accidentally gotten into the bottle but could not think of any logical way. Never thought of sabotage.




Ah, I looked at the bottle,
Someone had been using a 4-40 screw to plug the tip
and prevent spillage. I guess the steel screw "kicked off"
the reaction. I guess it is true, Loctite needs metal to
harden. I asked a rep once what the primer was.
He said it contained a copper oxide which kick starts
the hardening. He also says it tastes sweet because
it contains saccharin. Just like the artificial sweetener.
He said he uses Loctite in his coffee around the office.
I say he is full of shlt.
--Doozer

jim davies
05-30-2013, 12:31 AM
The belt and suspenders method is to put a small groove in whatever part is easiest, then press fit with loctite in it. If you have ever seen a saginaw U-joint cup retained only by plastic you'll have the idea.

George Seal
05-30-2013, 01:37 AM
My red is 45 years old and still not hard. and still works great

I heard (dont know as a fact ) that the bottles are porius.

vpt
05-30-2013, 08:00 AM
If you have ever seen a saginaw U-joint cup retained only by plastic you'll have the idea.



Thats exactly what I was thinking when I was reading this thread but just didn't mention it. I was thinking even just roughing up the bore a bit with some somewhat coarse sandpaper might do the trick.

Davidhcnc
05-30-2013, 09:56 AM
...you know the loctite is good....... if there are teeth marks on the lid:rolleyes: