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View Full Version : Karma got me!



browne92
05-28-2013, 03:58 PM
A few days ago, I called out Sir John when it took his granddaughter to point out to him that the plastic parts he cut with his laser didn't fit tightly because he didn't take into account the width of the beam.

I, on the other hand, am much more diligent than that. The acrylic pieces I cut out Saturday with my cnc router all came out too big, because I took into account the entire width of the end mill, instead of just half.

Go ahead. Say it. I can take it.

David Powell
05-28-2013, 04:17 PM
A few days ago, I called out Sir John when it took his granddaughter to point out to him that the plastic parts he cut with his laser didn't fit tightly because he didn't take into account the width of the beam.

I, on the other hand, am much more diligent than that. The acrylic pieces I cut out Saturday with my cnc router all came out too big, because I took into account the entire width of the end mill, instead of just half.

Go ahead. Say it. I can take it.

The fellow who has not made a few mistakes or miscalculations probably has not worked fast enough or often enough to be a serious contender in the productivity department. Regards David ( just lost a few thous again) Powell.

Alistair Hosie
05-28-2013, 04:26 PM
I never make mistakes never ever in my whole life.hardly any ever. Well a few maYBE. a few hundred in 62 years not bad a few hundred everyday for 62 years still that's not bad eh what do you lot think and don't forget his ludship is an elderly gentleman these days and you need to think of that actually he's two days older than father christmas LOL Alistair

jmarkwolf
05-28-2013, 05:42 PM
A few days ago, I called out Sir John ...
Go ahead. Say it. I can take it.

Clumsy bastard.





Just kidding of course!

John Stevenson
05-28-2013, 05:45 PM
clumsy bastard.





Just kidding of course!


lol

Dr Stan
05-28-2013, 06:44 PM
A few days ago, I called out Sir John when it took his granddaughter to point out to him that the plastic parts he cut with his laser didn't fit tightly because he didn't take into account the width of the beam.

I, on the other hand, am much more diligent than that. The acrylic pieces I cut out Saturday with my cnc router all came out too big, because I took into account the entire width of the end mill, instead of just half.

Go ahead. Say it. I can take it.

Puts you in good company. When the Hubble telescope was first launched they discovered the mirror was off by the diameter of the sphere on the measuring probe.

Mike Burch
05-28-2013, 07:01 PM
It is well said that the bloke who never made a mistake never made anything.
Welcome to the club!

John Stevenson
05-28-2013, 07:23 PM
I very, very, very rarely make a mistake.

OTOH I spend a 'lot' of time 'modifying' parts ;)

Willy
05-28-2013, 07:43 PM
Better too big than too small. It's a lot easier to take material off than to put it back on.

Today while cutting a keyway the darned end mill slipped in the holder because I hadn't tightened the set screw properly. I had to resort to making up a tapered key to account for my inattention.
The way I look at it, instead of a screw-up, it is now a feature, as the key will be hard pressed to walk out on it's own now that it's tapered.:)

John Stevenson
05-28-2013, 07:47 PM
Better too big than too small. It's a lot easier to take material off than to put it back on.

Today while cutting a keyway the darned end mill slipped in the holder because I hadn't tightened the set screw properly. I had to resort to making up a tapered key to account for my inattention.
The way I look at it, instead of a screw-up, it is now a feature, as the key will be hard pressed to walk out on it's own now that it's tapered.:)


Wow, you have invented the tapered gib key, patent pending

gcude
05-28-2013, 09:17 PM
Fixin boo-boos is sometimes where real talent shows itself.

NiftyNev
05-28-2013, 10:38 PM
Fixin boo-boos is sometimes where real talent shows itself.

I think fixing your own is easy. Fixing others boo-boos is where the fun begins.

Nev.

flylo
05-28-2013, 11:02 PM
MUM will be soooooo Proud!:)

Wow, you have invented the tapered gib key, patent pending

LKeithR
05-28-2013, 11:49 PM
...Go ahead. Say it. I can take it.

Yup, my grand-dad always used to say: "What goes around, comes around." Amazing how often it happens--to me, anyway...

flylo
05-29-2013, 02:22 AM
I used to Motocross & this saying applies to life as well. "If you don't fall down sometime your not going fast enough!":p

Jaakko Fagerlund
05-29-2013, 04:04 AM
I think fixing your own is easy. Fixing others boo-boos is where the fun begins.

Nev.
Nah, the fun is when you have to fix something someone else already tried to 'fix'.

beanbag
05-29-2013, 04:41 AM
A few days ago, I called out Sir John when it took his granddaughter to point out to him that the plastic parts he cut with his laser didn't fit tightly because he didn't take into account the width of the beam.

I, on the other hand, am much more diligent than that. The acrylic pieces I cut out Saturday with my cnc router all came out too big, because I took into account the entire width of the end mill, instead of just half.

Go ahead. Say it. I can take it.

I'm pretty sure it's the computer's fault.

Weston Bye
05-29-2013, 07:39 AM
I have always been fond of a quote I saw among other gems of wisdom I saw on a drill and tap chart:


"There are very few expert machinists. Rather, there are those who are experts at salvage and repair, and they are quiet about it."

If I can't be the former, I'll settle for the latter.

gizmo2
05-29-2013, 09:21 AM
I make so many mistakes in the shop I can't even remember them all, forcing me to repeat many of them. I would be upset if it weren't a hobby. I do remember one wildcat (gun) project where I tried to make both the chamber reamers and reloading dies. I had at least a pound of mistake for every ounce of product. Endeavor to persevere!

browne92
05-29-2013, 09:23 AM
Clumsy bastard.

Thank you. I may be able to sleep at night now.:o


Better too big than too small. It's a lot easier to take material off than to put it back on.

Not really in this case. I was clamping the acrylic by the edges and cutting parts out of the middle. Once the part came out, I lost my method of clamping. I suppose I could have double-sided taped down the part to recut, but getting it aligned to take a .7938mm pass would have been a PIA, so I binned it. Besides, acrylic is cheap.

Cheers! :D

Euph0ny
05-29-2013, 10:25 AM
I am a firm believer in the Bob Ross school of thought - I don't make "mistakes", but I frequently have "happy accidents"!

flylo
05-29-2013, 10:41 AM
I like Edisons way of thinking. That wasn't a failure, but a sucess in finding one more thing that won't work! MisQuote I know but you get the idea.

Silverback
05-29-2013, 11:38 PM
I think fixing your own is easy. Fixing others boo-boos is where the fun begins.

Nev.

Grrrrr


Nah, the fun is when you have to fix something someone else already tried to 'fix'.

Double GRRRRR!

I hate doing that. Seems to be what I spend way too much time doing

38_Cal
05-30-2013, 12:46 AM
"The difference between an amateur and a professional is in how well you cover your pecker tracks." Bob Dunlap, my main gunsmithing instructor at Lassen College in Susanville, CA.

David

browne92
05-30-2013, 09:04 AM
...pecker tracks."

Now there's a term I haven't heard in a VERY long time. I miss my technician days...

Tyro 001
05-30-2013, 04:22 PM
A sign of a true craftsman is the ability to repair his mistakes.