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View Full Version : Rotary Indexing Table for the Milling Machine, Part 2



Ian B
05-29-2013, 11:45 AM
A post was on here for a short while by a new member about a rotary table that fits in the machine vise on a mill. The post has now gone, probably because he was trying to sell the plans for $10.

I found this on youtube, which is probably similar to what the OP was referring to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=am5774rnjtU

Handy looking device. When reading the initial post, the thought occurred to me that anyone capable of making such a device (ie. your average HSM'er) probably wouldn't need to buy plans, they'd just do a scrap bin raid and knock something similar up.

Ian

wagnerite
05-29-2013, 12:46 PM
I tried something similar a few projects ago. It's not worth it. The mill will push/pull the work too much. If DOC is very low it works ok, but it will be quicker to just set up the work on a rotary table.

Dr Stan
05-29-2013, 01:04 PM
I tried something similar a few projects ago. It's not worth it. The mill will push/pull the work too much. If DOC is very low it works ok, but it will be quicker to just set up the work on a rotary table.

I certainly see that as an issue, but it would be an easy way to do bolt hole patterns if you did not have a DRO. Just needs a lock on the rotating table.

BTW never heard a locating pin called a spigot before. That's a new one on me.

michigan doug
06-01-2013, 10:39 AM
conventional milling with modest d.o.c.'s would make that device reasonably safe and productive. Climb milling would be looking for a disaster/crash.


doug

Baz
06-01-2013, 01:28 PM
While this is a tool for tool obsessives there is nothing wrong with the principle of not using a rotary table. For a century at least model engineers have made Stephenson valve gear expansion links with the pin/lever/carefull-movement technique.
The internet has encouraged people to try and sell plans forthe most trivial things. There do seem to be people who can't make anything without a detailed drawing - look how often on forums someone posts a picture of a simple gizmo they knocked up followed by requests for drawings etc.
I have encountered people who as children actually followed the written instructions in the Meccano booklet instead of just looking at the picture and understanding exactly how to make the model.

Davo J
06-01-2013, 08:10 PM
While this is a tool for tool obsessives there is nothing wrong with the principle of not using a rotary table. For a century at least model engineers have made Stephenson valve gear expansion links with the pin/lever/carefull-movement technique.
The internet has encouraged people to try and sell plans forthe most trivial things. There do seem to be people who can't make anything without a detailed drawing - look how often on forums someone posts a picture of a simple gizmo they knocked up followed by requests for drawings etc.
I have encountered people who as children actually followed the written instructions in the Meccano booklet instead of just looking at the picture and understanding exactly how to make the model.

I see the same thing, though I have seen many people say they just cant picture things in there head like others do.

Dave

John Stevenson
06-01-2013, 08:34 PM
I was once asked for drawings of a simple tool I'd shown, this was on the old RCM list
I refused on the grounds that it was [a] that simple you didn't need drawings and [b] by the time it was modified to fit the machine it was intended for my drawings wouldn't be relevant.

That didn't go down too well with some of the flat earth society and I was accused of being unhelpful.
Sod them, if they couldn't follow my reasoning there wasn't a cat in hells chance of them following a drawing.

topct
06-02-2013, 07:31 AM
I have a small Emco rotary indexer that I have used with a lever to turn while milling. An important thing to remember when building one would be a feature that keeps all the end play on it's spindle as close to zero as possible. The Emco uses a spring washer collapsed flat and held in place with a snap ring. The Emco also has a split in it's housing with an allen bolt through it so you can clamp the spindle in place.