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View Full Version : Buffer or grinder? whats the difference?



Mike Bell
06-07-2013, 08:53 PM
I got a deal on a big arse Baldor. All I saw was Baldor and 1.5 HP and 1800rpm, and I got it for almost nothing, literally.


Problem is, its a grinder. It has grinding stones on it and the short shaft with the guards and work light sockets. I just figured I could buy the long buffer shaft and swap it out. Seemed like a good idea.

I go to the Baldor web site and the model #1021 is listed as a grinder. And don't see any long shafts to swap it to.

Whats the difference between the buffer and grinder? Its has the HP and the rpm I need for buffing, just not the long shaft to give me more room to move around on the wheel and parts.

Any ideas or thoughts on using a grinder as a buffer or are the they same thing just different?

Peter.
06-07-2013, 09:16 PM
You can buy the spiral ended shafts quite readily - so long as they do one with the thread your grinder has. I also saw someone who had turned up a shaft extension and bolted the mop to the end of that with a couple of cheek-plates.

lakeside53
06-08-2013, 01:31 AM
I have a Baldor 1021 and a buffer (I forget the model). The grinder has shorter shafts and wheel guards. The buffer has longer shafts and no guards. RPM is the same.

You can use the grinder as a buffer. Make up shaft extensions if you need more room, but you will also need to make new bearing caps if you remove the cast guard.

Jpfalt
06-08-2013, 01:57 PM
The difference between buffers and grinders is fairly simple. The buffer uses a cloth or felt wheel that catches things like rings and watches and tears them off including all the tendons up to the elbow and then whips you with the free end of the tendons.

A grinding just blows up and ventilates you with big chunks of ceramic.

Otherwise they are pretty much interchangeable.

customcutter
06-08-2013, 02:08 PM
The difference between buffers and grinders is fairly simple. The buffer uses a cloth or felt wheel that catches things like rings and watches and tears them off including all the tendons up to the elbow and then whips you with the free end of the tendons.

A grinding just blows up and ventilates you with big chunks of ceramic.

Otherwise they are pretty much interchangeable.

Yes, of everything in my shop I used to fear the buffer the most. I used to make a few custom knives, and I once had a titanium liner lock folder with mother of pearl scales snatched out of my hands while trying to do the final polish. Amazingly the knife hit the concrete floor bounced about 3 feet up the wall and when I picked it up didn't have a scratch on it any where. I was expecting both scales to be shattered. The good Lord was looking out for me that day.

CC

thaiguzzi
06-09-2013, 02:57 AM
You can get "pigtails", which are the course threaded shafts which polishing mops screw onto, L/H and R/H thread, with a grub screw and straight internal bore for bolting straight onto a grinder spindle. I have one on my Creusen linisher/grinder which is now a linisher/polisher. Check out the usual supplier/suspects. I also think 1800 rpm is a bit slow for polishing, 3000 rpm is better, most industrial polishers are 2800-3000 rpm.

ptjw7uk
06-09-2013, 03:07 AM
If the speed is to slow get larger mops, its surface speed that does the polishing!!
peter

KJ1I
06-10-2013, 01:54 AM
To expand on the previous, grinders have short shafts and buffers have long shafts. Grinding (with a bench grinder) is normally limited to shaping and/or sharpening tools. Think cutting tools, chisels, and the like. The point is there is a fairly small contact area with the wheel. The long shaft on the buffer allows large areas or long parts to be moved around the buffing wheel. I would be comfortable putting buffing wheels on a grinder, the only problem would be the limited work area. If that's okay for the type of work you're doing, no problem. However, I would not put grinding wheels out on the ends of a buffer's shaft.

thaiguzzi
06-10-2013, 05:13 AM
If the speed is to slow get larger mops, its surface speed that does the polishing!!
peter

larger mops need larger hp too. i can stop an 8" mop on a 3/4 hp polisher. You cannot even slow down a 3-5 hp polisher with a 10" mop. Believe me, polishing metal for a living is not the nicest job in the world. Having said that, if you are good at it, you can earn good money. I was involved in the metal polishing trade for 15 years in the UK.
Mike.

vpt
06-10-2013, 08:53 AM
I pulled all the shields of my baldor on the pedestal and use it as a buffer. It has somewhat surprisingly long shafts for a metal grinder and works great for all the polishing I ever needed to do.