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topct
04-02-2004, 11:55 AM
Just got a SB9 model C. I'm taking it apart to clean everything out. While it's apart I thought I'd tighten up the carriage handwheel. There is a pin holding it to the shaft, is it tapered or straight? There are other pins holding things to shafts with pins, what type are these? I have read here that some are using pipe cleaners to replace the felt oilers for the spindle, don't they have wire in them? Would fabric store felt work? Or should you use some of the hard felt like that used on piano hammers? The spindle is in near perfect shape and I'd like to keep it that way.

JCHannum
04-02-2004, 12:08 PM
The pins are tapered, look closely, and you will see large and small end.
There is information on oilers in the Third Hand section under SB 9 spindle Oilers.
Enjoy your lathe.

Mike Burdick
04-02-2004, 12:17 PM
tpct,

You might consider ordering a manual from South Bend for your model. It's very informative and well worth the cost. I don't know what their phone number is, now that they changed hands, but perhaps someone can post it for us.

Mike

Evan
04-02-2004, 12:23 PM
Look here:

http://www.southbendlathe.com/manuals.htm

Number is 1-800-245-2843

[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 04-02-2004).]

lynnl
04-02-2004, 12:55 PM
Per JC's tapered pin comment, I'll reemphasize the caution to look closely. Look REAL CLOSE.
On a recently acquired shaper I spent a couple of hours (unproductively) trying to punch one out the wrong way. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif I was sure I was punching the small end. Hard to tell the difference when they're stained and dinged.

ERBenoit
04-02-2004, 01:08 PM
Heed the previous warning. The shorter the pin the harder it may be able to tell. When I was refurbishing my SB lathe, I thought I was driving the small end of the pin also. Mine was on the half nut lever though. Broke lever casting in half. Luckily, there is a small foundry near me, I was able to get a new lever cast, not out of cast iron as I would have liked, but bronze instead. I had them cast three of them, just in case. Cost for all three $25.00. Probably could not buy one lever from SBL for that price.

Mike Burdick
04-02-2004, 03:03 PM
Evan, thanks for the link and the phone number.

-Mike

Pete Burne
04-02-2004, 05:03 PM
ERBenoit:

Where did you get three levers cast for $25 bucks? What a bargain!!

I would expect to pay that to just walk thru the door (well, not quite)

Pete

frankc64
04-02-2004, 09:18 PM
Peter,

I've had some work done recently at Mystic River Foundry, nearer me than you, but still only 30 minutes from Branford. Castings have been cheaper than I expected.

www.mysticriverfoundry.com/ (http://www.mysticriverfoundry.com/)

Frank

frankc64
04-02-2004, 09:23 PM
Topct,

I just came across this yesterday while trying to solve a similar problem. It's an Army technical manual on the SB9 lathe - seems quite detailed - 66 pages.

https://www.logsa.army.mil/etms/data/A/047809.pdf

Hope this helps.

Frank

BillH
04-02-2004, 10:20 PM
OH MAN!! That foundry is in CT! woohoo!
Now I know where to get my bronze wheels castings done for my Gauge 1 projects!

Mike Burdick
04-02-2004, 11:05 PM
frankc64,

Does the site you posted the link to have other machinery manuals?

If so how do I find them? The site is not too easy to move around in.

Thanks Mike

Paul Alciatore
04-02-2004, 11:22 PM
I just replaced the oilers on mine. The old ones were plainly worn out and the springs were scraping against the spindle. Not a desirable condition.

I got the new oilers from LeBlond for $12 each plus shipping. They were very helpful.

You could make oilers from springs, felt, and some cotton. I took pictures and plan to post one or two to the Yahoo SB9 board so you can see how they are made. There's a ruler in the pictre for scale. Check there Sunday or Monday.

I definitely wouldn't use pipe cleaners. Absolutely not.

Paul A.

frankc64
04-03-2004, 01:02 AM
Mike,

I just tried to find the same page where I found the SB manual and got this msg

"The ETM database will be offline Friday from 2000 to 1700 Saturday CST."

Anyway, I think this is the site where I found it.

http://www.logsa.army.mil/etms/find_etm.cfm

There must have been hundreds of manuals there, so I would imagine that there are others there for machines. To search; I just did a ctrl-f and typed in lathe.

Frank

Mike Burdick
04-03-2004, 01:49 AM
Frank,

Thanks! I'll give it a try Sunday - who knows what wealth of information might be there.

Mike

topct
04-03-2004, 10:42 AM
Thanks for the replies and the links. Will probably order them from Leblond or South Bend. Looking at the pins, it really is hard to tell what direction to drive them out, will have to be carefull with that.
One more question. What's with the "oil holes", I have discouvered most of the oil holes seem to be either partly or completely plugged with dirt. I thought I might put either some plugs or maybe use those little flip top oil caps that are used elswhere. Any opinions? Thanks again,

BillH
04-03-2004, 12:29 PM
Get some kerosene, and flush out the head stock, no telling if the previous owner used the proper spindle oil. Your going to use good quality spindle oil right?
I use mobils spindle oil #10.
Kerosene will also clean out all the plugged oil holes.

Paul Alciatore
04-03-2004, 01:59 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by topct:
Thanks for the replies and the links. Will probably order them from Leblond or South Bend. Looking at the pins, it really is hard to tell what direction to drive them out, will have to be carefull with that.
One more question. What's with the "oil holes", I have discouvered most of the oil holes seem to be either partly or completely plugged with dirt. I thought I might put either some plugs or maybe use those little flip top oil caps that are used elswhere. Any opinions? Thanks again, </font>

My pins all have one end that's sticking out of the hole and the other is recessed. I just figured that the high end was the biggest one and punched the other one to remove. It's worked so far.

Some of the larger oil holes may have felt in them. This helps to prevent chips and dirt from getting to the bearing area. If you start digging it out, go slow and leave any felt in there. Or replace it.

Paul A.

topct
04-03-2004, 03:31 PM
Bill, the headstock is in my parts washer right now. And a friend just made a little gift of that very same oil.
Paul, just punched the pin out that holds the eccentric on the end of the back gear shaft. No felt in any of the holes and some are not even drilled through? I believe these were to have those tiny ball type oilers that I've seen in other machines. I wonder what might have been happening at South Bend when this was built. The support for the drive end of the lead screw has a hole in it that doesn't go through and the oil hole where the compounds lead screw oiler doesn't either. There may be more. ???

frankc64
04-04-2004, 04:25 PM
The link works today. I found a search in the pub-title-text field works well. 20 hits for "lathe".

http://www.logsa.army.mil/etms/find_etm.cfm

Also, I found an operator & maint. manual for my Burke #4 milling machine!

Frank

abn
04-05-2004, 12:21 AM
There is a huge wealth of machinery manuals at the LOGSA site...including manuals and parts lists for forklifts and other such stuff. I spent a night going through it and a hint is that TM's are grouped by "LIN" number. IOW, if you find a manual, you can go through TM #s sequentially to find similar equipment.

The felt wicks on a SB are SAE F1 felt in 1/8" and 3/8" IIRC. I'm still trying to find the spec for the wipers...I assume they are F3, but I'm not sure nor do I know how much of a difference it makes.

Paul Alciatore
04-05-2004, 12:33 PM
I just finished cleaning and fixing up a spare compound I bought for my SB9 last night. I discovered that the oil hole leads to a recess behind the threads in the bushing. There were two small (3/32") holes in the bushing that were completely blocked with dried up grease and crud. I think the oil is supposed to find it's way around the recess an in through the holes in the bushing. I gusee the recess also acts as an oil resivoir so you don't run out so fast.

Perhaps the other oil holes have similar tricks to them?

On e more thing I noticed is that the small pin in the ball handle is also tapered about 0.002" over it's length. Now that one is really impossible to see.

I'm learning more and more every day.

I remember seeing a post stating that shim washers were not the proper way to take out backlash in these leadscrews. Does anyone know the proper way. My compound seems to have about 0.010" in the screw/nut but about 0.020" in the screw/bushing/handle area (total = 0.030"). I doubt I will be able to get a better screw/nut fit. I can't see anything to do except put in shim washers to lessen the screw/bushing fit???

Paul A.



<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by topct:
Bill, the headstock is in my parts washer right now. And a friend just made a little gift of that very same oil.
Paul, just punched the pin out that holds the eccentric on the end of the back gear shaft. No felt in any of the holes and some are not even drilled through? I believe these were to have those tiny ball type oilers that I've seen in other machines. I wonder what might have been happening at South Bend when this was built. The support for the drive end of the lead screw has a hole in it that doesn't go through and the oil hole where the compounds lead screw oiler doesn't either. There may be more. ??? </font>

ERBenoit
04-05-2004, 12:49 PM
Peter,
Sorry I was not able to answer your request sooner, frankc64 beat me to answering. Mystic River Foundry is where I had the levers cast. I had it done I guesstimate about 10 years ago. I brought both halves of the broken lever, next day I had three castings and the broken lever back. I do not know thier current rates.

topct
04-05-2004, 06:22 PM
Paul, mine was a mess also. These holes were meant to have a little ball type oiler in them. Why South Bend didn't install them I don't know. However you can get them.

http://www.gitsmfg.com/gits-catalog.asp

I think you need to go though a distributor, but they have listings for them at the site. As to the slop in the screws, if the nuts are warn there might not be much to do there, but it looks like the slack at the handwheel may be taken out buy shortening that little pin that keeps the handle from turning on the shaft? Maybe someone here knows what can be done there, mine are sloppy there also. Maybe start another topic about that problem?

BillH
04-05-2004, 06:27 PM
The cross feed nut on my 9C is not stock, it is a zero backlash nut, which was a pleasant surprise when I got it home and looked at it. I was wondering why the cross feed had no or very little backlash while looking at it.
The compound on the other hand... The screw is warn out on it, or perhaps the nut. It moves less than indicated on collar in middle of the screw.
Here is a link that some one else posted either here or on another forum, I may take them up on their compound screw.
http://www.millermachineandfabrication.com/products.htm#southbend