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Dr Stan
07-07-2013, 11:30 PM
Here is a link that in turn lists a number of organizations promoting American made goods along with links to a number of US manufacturing companies many of whom also use American materials/components.

Those who are running small shops and/or offer unique products may want to join one of the organizations for help promoting their products and services.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/13/living/made-in-america/index.html?hpt=hp_t5

Doozer
07-08-2013, 07:10 AM
They forgot Filson clothing.

http://www.filson.com/

--Doozer

PixMan
07-08-2013, 07:42 AM
They "forgot" literally hundreds if not thousands of other companies. I'll mention Hyde Tools and Russell Harrington Cutlery, both of Southbridge MA. RHC is mostly commercial cutlery, Hyde makes and sells several price point levels of hand tools related to painting, wallpapering and plaster work.

Of course they would think to mention Mahr-Federal, Starrett, Fisher Machine Products and a host of others who cater to us machinists.

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 08:17 AM
They "forgot" literally hundreds if not thousands of other companies. I'll mention Hyde Tools and Russell Harrington Cutlery, both of Southbridge MA. RHC is mostly commercial cutlery, Hyde makes and sells several price point levels of hand tools related to painting, wallpapering and plaster work.

Of course they would think to mention Mahr-Federal, Starrett, Fisher Machine Products and a host of others who cater to us machinists.

I did not expect them to have a comprehensive list. However, what if we put together our own list to use and/or submit to the organizations so they in turn could help promote other US companies?

Stan

1-800miner
07-08-2013, 09:07 AM
I like that idea.

Doozer
07-08-2013, 09:20 AM
Let us make our own list of USA companies and make it a sticky on top of HSM.

--Doozer

DR
07-08-2013, 09:23 AM
I did not expect them to have a comprehensive list. However, what if we put together our own list to use and/or submit to the organizations so they in turn could help promote other US companies?

Stan

Yeah, good idea........promoting buying only American made goods might put our host here out of business though.

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 09:27 AM
Yeah, good idea........promoting buying only American made goods might put our host here out of business though.

Not if VP was able to convince them to advertise here which in my mind would be a win win.

flylo
07-08-2013, 09:27 AM
I'd like to see the short list of companies making products in the US useing only US made parts or materials.
Looks like the Stormy Chromer cap is only sewn here?

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 09:34 AM
I'd like to see the short list of companies making products in the US useing only US made parts or materials.
Looks like the Stormy Chromer cap is only sewn here?

Some of them do use US materials/components such as the jeans company. However, many like the cap company offshore at least some of the product.

toyjeep73
07-08-2013, 09:40 AM
Garage Journal has a whole list of USA made products.

Made In the U.S.A. (http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=32)

I forgot it was there, thanks for the reminder.

Gator
07-08-2013, 09:50 AM
Garage Journal Website must be down. Can't get it to load.
Sounds like a website I would be interested in also.

Larry M.

flylo
07-08-2013, 09:55 AM
We could call it the "ALL AMERICAN LIST"

Rustybolt
07-08-2013, 10:54 AM
The best slitting saws I ever bought were made in Poland. The worst ones were a well known American brand.

I think a better idea would be to offer up a list of the best companies offering the beat product at reasonable prices.

It is, after all, a global economy.

Has been for a few hundred years.

JRouche
07-08-2013, 12:02 PM
Im all for the Made in America list. Thanks for the resources guys. JR

H380
07-08-2013, 01:21 PM
http://www.weinbrennerusa.com/

Just bought a pair of steel toe boots for work. Made in Wisconsin and cheaper than Redwings.

dp
07-08-2013, 01:37 PM
There is a website called MadeInTheUSA.com that promotes American made products. Don't expect much:

http://madeintheusa.com/search.php?category=Tools&search=metal+lathe

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 01:45 PM
There is a website called MadeInTheUSA.com that promotes American made products. Don't expect much:

http://madeintheusa.com/search.php?category=Tools&search=metal+lathe

A Grizzly "made in America"? :rolleyes: Let's see I think I still have that water front property in NW Nebraska available. Lots of beach sand available as the area is called the Sandhills.

dp
07-08-2013, 02:11 PM
A Grizzly "made in America"? :rolleyes: Let's see I think I still have that water front property in NW Nebraska available. Lots of beach sand available as the area is called the Sandhills.

Ya - it was an instant disappointment, but I suspected as much when I saw the search results come from Amazon.

If y'all are going to build a list I'd start with some HSM magazine adverts because they have two pluses on their side - home grown and already on the team. Those are the people who make this BBS possible.

lazlo
07-08-2013, 02:44 PM
I'd like to see the short list of companies making products in the US useing only US made parts or materials.
Looks like the Stormy Chromer cap is only sewn here?

...and what do you do with companies like Starrett with an ever increasing portion of their product line-up made in China?

"Garage Journal has a whole list of USA made products."

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=137241

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 04:15 PM
...and what do you do with companies like Starrett with an ever increasing portion of their product line-up made in China?

Milwaukee is pulling the same crap. Just have to do ones due diligence.

elf
07-08-2013, 05:29 PM
How about renaming this to the Hypocrisy thread?

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 08:43 PM
How about renaming this to the Hypocrisy thread?

We're not the ones being hypocrites, that title belongs to the bean counters running American big business.

In contrast I want to try to support those who manufacture in the US. They are out there, it just takes some effort to find them. If each of us can find and share info on say 2 or 3 manufacturing firms in the US by the simple power of our numbers we can do much more than any one of us alone. IMHO this is real patriotism, in contrast to acting like some knuckle dragger grunting some ignorant cheer.

sasquatch
07-08-2013, 08:51 PM
Just my opinion on this, but i think this is a great idea, and come to think of it, wonder why it hasn't been compiled before this.
Each catalog one asks for should have a little box with country of origin posted above each item, so purchasers know what they are buying.
("Lee Valley" tools does this with a lot of their tools.)

Rustybolt
07-08-2013, 08:59 PM
Originally Posted by lazlo
...and what do you do with companies like Starrett with an ever increasing portion of their product line-up made in China?


Buy Mitutoyo

elf
07-08-2013, 09:08 PM
We're not the ones being hypocrites, that title belongs to the bean counters running American big business.

In contrast I want to try to support those who manufacture in the US. They are out there, it just takes some effort to find them. If each of us can find and share info on say 2 or 3 manufacturing firms in the US by the simple power of our numbers we can do much more than any one of us alone. IMHO this is real patriotism, in contrast to acting like some knuckle dragger grunting some ignorant cheer.

Well, you are posting on a forum based in England with members from all over the world and it's more than likely that 80% of all the material goods you use on a daily basis were manufactured in some other country. The 'Buy American' slogan has been around for at least 50 years and I would have to say it hasn't worked out well.

If you truly want to change the current status, you need to need figure out how the US government can make it profitable for US businesses to manufacture in the US and to compete in the world market.

sasquatch
07-08-2013, 09:13 PM
Good point Elf.

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 09:23 PM
If you truly want to change the current status, you need to need figure out how the US government can make it profitable for US businesses to manufacture in the US and to compete in the world market.

Its not the US government that is creating the problems. Read this: http://www.salon.com/2013/07/08/how_%E2%80%9Cecon_101%E2%80%9D_is_killing_america/

Dr Stan
07-08-2013, 09:25 PM
Originally Posted by lazlo
...and what do you do with companies like Starrett with an ever increasing portion of their product line-up made in China?


Buy Mitutoyo


Better yet Scherr-Tumico http://www.stindustries.com/

ulav8r
07-08-2013, 10:06 PM
The Home Shop Machinist
P.O. Box 629
Traverse City, MI 49685



Well, you are posting on a forum based in England with members from all over the world and it's more than likely that 80% of all the material goods you use on a daily basis were manufactured in some other country. The 'Buy American' slogan has been around for at least 50 years and I would have to say it hasn't worked out well.

If you truly want to change the current status, you need to need figure out how the US government can make it profitable for US businesses to manufacture in the US and to compete in the world market.

flylo
07-08-2013, 10:55 PM
It's even based in the Best state in the USA. You can't beat that!:rolleyes:

JRouche
07-08-2013, 11:08 PM
The Home Shop Machinist
P.O. Box 629
Traverse City, MI 49685

Right? I saw what Elf posted and thought I had missed something over the years. JR

john hobdeclipe
07-08-2013, 11:16 PM
My cynical and skeptical little self sits here wondering how much $$$ that tiny handful of companies paid to CNN to be included in the "News" article.

Juergenwt
07-09-2013, 12:30 AM
Made on Sewing Machine made in the US????? Look behind the curtain.

sawlog
07-09-2013, 04:41 AM
Some one metioned comapanies using outsoursed products in thier product line. Heck there is offshore parts in a lot of made in the USA products. My day job is at Eaton who has the lions share of the heavy duty (Class 8) truck transmisson market in the US. A lot of the gears and shafts are made in China, all of the shifting yokes are made in Korea. Then we have a assembly plant in Mexixco.

Several years ago I ran into some Freighliner folks talking about a trucking company ordering new trucks who spec. that the transmissions were to be made in one of the US plants. I told them that did a lot of good when you still had offshore parts in the transmission no matter wher it was made in the US or Mexico.

The motto of the story it is hard to buy a product that is 100% USA made.

vincemulhollon
07-09-2013, 11:35 AM
Milwaukee is pulling the same crap. Just have to do ones due diligence.

Different situation. Milwaukee (originally 20 miles east of me) is now merely a brand name used by a Hong Kong company, TTI. There is no "milwaukee company" anymore, it has nothing to do with milwaukee the city, all Chinese stuff with a name on it that they can't even read. Better off just buying the walmart special, right off the same assembly line and cheaper.

Starrett is an entirely different situation, they're a real company selling under their own name, however some of the stuff they sell under their name is just rebadged Chinese stuff.

You can find out all kinds of stuff on wikipedia.

gcude
07-09-2013, 12:21 PM
You can find out all kinds of stuff on wikipedia.

Yes, but without OldTiffie around, we have to do all the searching ourselves. :rolleyes:

dian
07-09-2013, 12:31 PM
do you guys realise, that protectionism is bad? bad for everybody. get a book on economics or google (i guess). it is unbelievable but true: nobody ever lears from history.

Evan
07-09-2013, 12:36 PM
Everything my wife sells is made in North America. All the grinding wheels except the CBN and Diamond wheels are made in the US. The factory is just across the line in Washington State. The CBN and Diamond are made in BC, Canada. She does not sell Chinese products, period. That includes all the other items, not just the wheels.

Dr Stan
07-09-2013, 01:04 PM
Everything my wife sells is made in North America. All the grinding wheels except the CBN and Diamond wheels are made in the US. The factory is just across the line in Washington State. The CBN and Diamond are made in BC, Canada. She does not sell Chinese products, period. That includes all the other items, not just the wheels.

Good for her. This is exactly the type of business we need to promote and support with our purchases.

Evan
07-09-2013, 01:49 PM
I doubt that many people, especially in the US are aware that Canada is by far the largest trade partner of the US, not China. Not even close. Percent of all trade both directions with Canada is 16.8% of total US trade this year so far. China-US is 13.6% and 3/4 of that is import from China. With Canada the trade is close to balanced which is good for both sides. It has always been that way in the past too.

lazlo
07-09-2013, 01:58 PM
Good for her. This is exactly the type of business we need to promote and support with our purchases.

Likewise! Quite frankly, I'm just as happy buying Canadian, or German, Swiss or Japanese gear. I just hate to see quality tools get outsourced into oblivion like Nicholson, Milwaukee, Jacobs, ...


do you guys realise, that protectionism is bad? bad for everybody. get a book on economics or google (i guess). it is unbelievable but true: nobody ever lears from history.

It's a lot more complicated than that Dian. China has killed a good portion of heavy industry in the world, not just the US. Heck, even Bosch is outsourcing some of their tools to China now. How can you compete with nearly free labor and government subsidized materials and utilities, and manipulated currency?

Case in point: when the state of California solicited a bid to replace a large segment of the Oakland Bay Bridge, all the usual national and multinational construction companies bid. But an obscure Chinese government-owned construction company, with literally no background or experience in bridge construction, under-bid everyone else by half a billion dollars.

There was a creepy Businessweek interview with the Chinese official responsible for the bid, and when they asked how they could make a profit with such a low bid, his answer was: "Profit was not a factor in our bid."

In other words, they're bidding to put all the large project construction companies out of business.

If you read some of the articles about the bridge's construction, the welders are paid $9/day for 12 hour shifts. I don't know about you, but I'd be more than a little worried driving across a bridge welded by guys being paid $1/hour :o

Bridge Comes to San Francisco With a Made-in-China Label
(http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/26/business/global/26bridge.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0)

Guido
07-09-2013, 02:04 PM
You can see the bottom of CNN's short bucket if they list only those US manufacturers who are not burning the 7 million bbls/day of petroleum imported from Mexico, Canada, Russia, Venezuela, Saudi Arabia--------

Arthur.Marks
07-09-2013, 02:32 PM
I was heavily involved with fine art in my "former" life. Every type of human occupation has an inborne, ironic self-hatred, I've come to realize. Usually it doesn't take long to notice the parroting refrain. With fine art, I found it to be a derision of "hipsters." The definition was always a moving target with one constant: you were not one of them. Some noble aspect of yourself raised you apart. "They're so superficial!"

With manufacturing, at least in the US, it is this "patriotic" disdain for all things manufactured elsewhere. "Oh, wait," I hear. "I didn't mean Europe or Japan or Australia or Korea or...!" Didn't you? Isn't such personal sentiment -- and mass rallying cry -- based at least a little bit on an emotion of superiority or obstinate rebuttal? Is it truly formed wholeheartedly on a respect of a job well done or a product well made? The constant, inescapable human refrain of "us" versus "them" is really disheartening to me -- especially in the context of a message forum with significant contributions from international members. There must be a John Lennon song that can be appropriately inserted here. :(

dp
07-09-2013, 02:51 PM
There was a creepy Businessweek interview with the Chinese official responsible for the bid, and when they asked how they could make a profit with such a low bid, his answer was: "Profit was not a factor in our bid."

In other words, they're bidding to put all the large project construction companies out of business.


You have to admit - that is cheaper than strategic bombing. They've learned the easiest way to destroy the US is to buy it or drive it out of business. Feel like frog in the slow-heating pot, yet?

Regarding the larger issue of the US-centric criticisms, I've taken the more reasonable position that Dr. Stan is suggesting we buy locally. All of us. I think Dr. Stan, being a reasonable chap that he is, would agree. That means the members from the UK can presume he means they should buy from UK vendors, same with all nationalities and their vendors. By taking that reasonable view of his suggestions it is possible to have this conversation without nationalistic distractions. To that end I'd welcome any lists of local vendors from the various interested non-US participants. Where do residents of Tristan da Cunha buy TIG filler rod? I can't even find it in Seattle.

Rustybolt
07-09-2013, 03:22 PM
lazlo
I'd be very surprised if the state gave them the job.

lazlo
07-09-2013, 03:54 PM
I'd be very surprised if the state gave them the job.

The Govenator himself flew to China to proudly proclaim all the money California saved by having the Chinese build the Bay bridge for them!

http://images.politico.com/global//blogs/Arnold_Bridge.jpg

lazlo
07-09-2013, 04:01 PM
Isn't such personal sentiment -- and mass rallying cry -- based at least a little bit on an emotion of superiority or obstinate rebuttal? Is it truly formed wholeheartedly on a respect of a job well done or a product well made? The constant, inescapable human refrain of "us" versus "them" is really disheartening to me -- especially in the context of a message forum with significant contributions from international members.

When you run across a job well done or a product well-made from China, let us know. ;)
Personally, I haven't run across a single product that was outsourced: Nicholson, Jacobs, Milwaukee, Starrett, Bosch... being great examples, where the quality didn't radically decrease.

I was dismayed when I purchased a Milwaukee Portaband the year that they were outsourced (2008, IIRC), and my welding instructor and I compared the 2008 Made in USA model he had. The difference was shocking, as noted by the flood of negative reviews on Amazon et al.

Dr Stan
07-09-2013, 04:18 PM
You have to admit - that is cheaper than strategic bombing. They've learned the easiest way to destroy the US is to buy it or drive it out of business. Feel like frog in the slow-heating pot, yet?

Regarding the larger issue of the US-centric criticisms, I've taken the more reasonable position that Dr. Stan is suggesting we buy locally. All of us. I think Dr. Stan, being a reasonable chap that he is, would agree. That means the members from the UK can presume he means they should buy from UK vendors, same with all nationalities and their vendors.

That's exactly where I'm coming from. I have bought, and will in all certainty do so in the future, quality goods again from other countries. A good example are my made in Switzerland Bosch drill drivers. However, when I purchase a name brand product expecting a high level of quality & performance and I'm presented with a piece of crap with only the name remaining I'm pissed.

For example if I purchased Waterford china or crystal only to discover it was made in China or some such instead of Ireland you'd hear an explosion around the world.

dp
07-09-2013, 04:33 PM
When you run across a job well done or a product well-made from China, let us know. ;)


I think you can probably find something well made here: http://www.made-in-china.com/. I don't accept that everything made in China is crap - but a lot of crap is made there. It's made in the US too, of course. I'm quite happy with the Chinese-made TIG/Stick/MIG welder I bought. It works exactly to spec. I won't be too happy if the magic smoke comes out of it, but I have a Lincoln MIG welder I feel the same way about.

Rustybolt
07-09-2013, 05:37 PM
The Govenator himself flew to China to proudly proclaim all the money California saved by having the Chinese build the Bay bridge for them!

http://images.politico.com/global//blogs/Arnold_Bridge.jpg

Ah. I see. The sections were prebuilt in China and then the bridge was assembled by American labor in San Francisco. You didn't make that clear.

If this was Chicago I'd wonder which Alderman owned the bulk of the stock of the Chinese steel company. Since it's California ....................

lazlo
07-09-2013, 05:44 PM
I don't accept that everything made in China is crap - but a lot of crap is made there.

Agreed. My point is that I've never seen a product from any country that was outsourced to China where quality didn't suffer greatly.


I'm quite happy with the Chinese-made TIG/Stick/MIG welder I bought. It works exactly to spec. I won't be too happy if the magic smoke comes out of it, but I have a Lincoln MIG welder I feel the same way about.

Oh boy! I've read a lot of bad stories about those Chinese combo units!

You realize all the consumer-grade Lincolns are made in China now, right? :) I'm sure Macona has a great deal to say about it ;)

spope14
07-09-2013, 09:55 PM
Been a while since I have been on this board, golfing, and working two jobs. One of my jobs is as a trainer with a manufacturing company that makes a product that is MANUFACTURED in the USA, not just made in the USA. This means than not 10% of the product is USA made, but 85% of the product is made in the USA. There is quite a difference. Proud of this company, you see their product in the air, and in emergencies. They also sponsor a racing series, airplane race teams, and a bobsled team.

www.whelen.com

Rustybolt
07-10-2013, 07:03 AM
Agreed. My point is that I've never seen a product from any country that was outsourced to China where quality didn't suffer greatly.



Oh boy! I've read a lot of bad stories about those Chinese combo units!

You realize all the consumer-grade Lincolns are made in China now, right? :) I'm sure Macona has a great deal to say about it ;)


So it's just China you object to?


spope

You'd be amazed at the stuff that is made overseas that is used to assemble all those Made In America Products. You'd also be amazed at all the stuff made in America that are used in foreign products.

Dr Stan
07-10-2013, 08:42 AM
You'd also be amazed at all the stuff made in America that are used in foreign products.

Do you have any documented examples?

Rustybolt
07-10-2013, 12:34 PM
Do you have any documented examples?


I can't document it , but I used to get parts ground at a company that ground all the spindles for Mazak and Okuma. All the centerless grinding for Honda motorcycles was done by a company in Addison Illinois.

The company I work for puts threadlocker on all kinds of fasteners from China. All over the world actually.

Willy
07-10-2013, 01:11 PM
Do you have any documented examples?

Don't sound so surprised.
Despite all of the dome and gloom of outsourcing to other countries manufacturing in North America is alive and well, and getting a stronger foothold abroad.:)

I subscribe to a large number of various trade publications catering to a diverse number of industries and lately I too have noticed that the general consensus among all is that the tide is turning for quality North American produced products being shipped offshore.

Just do a quick search of US made goods or components shipped abroad and I'm sure you'll find documentation.

Alistair Hosie
07-10-2013, 01:51 PM
MY old pal Fred just bought a makita sliding table saw (an expensive item)with wheeled trolley stamped made in japan their is a 2mm or more difference between the slot in the saw for the miter gauge which comes with the saw and the slot min the saw sliding table table itself one fits and one does not what the heck is happening.I would also strongly advise watching what you buy.Myself I am a strong beleiver in buying older used machinery and have better deals this way all round. Alistair buy Ameri8can if it's all perfect that is or at least you can complain on the telephone to some english speaking person LOL Alistair

Dr Stan
07-10-2013, 02:20 PM
Don't sound so surprised.

Just do a quick search of US made goods or components shipped abroad and I'm sure you'll find documentation.

Not surprised, skeptical.

BTW, since you made the claim it is up to you to provide documentation, not the other way around.

Willy
07-10-2013, 02:29 PM
Look it up...I'm not the one that is skeptical.

Guido
07-10-2013, 02:46 PM
Haas has a pretty good website: Manufactured 100%, Oxnard, USA. Largest US machine manufacturer, supplying American iron to China, it's largest export customer. No documentation necessary.

Dr Stan
07-10-2013, 04:27 PM
Look it up...I'm not the one that is skeptical.

no you're just being lazy. You made the statement now back it up.

Billy Hill
09-04-2013, 09:32 AM
Don't sound so surprised.
Despite all of the dome and gloom of outsourcing to other countries manufacturing in North America is alive and well, and getting a stronger foothold abroad.:)

I subscribe to a large number of various trade publications catering to a diverse number of industries and lately I too have noticed that the general consensus among all is that the tide is turning for quality North American produced products being shipped offshore.

Just do a quick search of US made goods or components shipped abroad and I'm sure you'll find documentation.

Nothing personal Willy, but that's a load of crap. Period.

The fact that the US is getting a "stronger foothold in China" is a result of outsourcing, it's not the intention. And it's completely temporary. When the Chinese firms (i.e. the .gov) figures out how to copy your **** they WILL and then you'll be out of the market because you cant compete.

I work in supply chain for a multi million dollar international OEM. I am a Purchasing Supervisor/Sourcing Specialist in charge of machined and sheet metal procurement. To give you an example, our machines have 8,000 to 13,000 different components, a third are build to print. I worked at 2 or 3 different shops in my career that made parts for this company that I'm now procuring parts for.

Our company has taken > 75% of our work off-shore in the last 5 years. We've laid off hundreds of people locally and at least 2 shops closed directly because of this and 90% of our other shops have lost > 75% of the work we used to give them.

Do you honestly think for one second that this is a good thing for Americans? Do you REALLY think it's creating a foothold for US manufacturers in China that will create jobs for Americans? Methinks you need to get a better view of what's going on cuz you can't seem to see **** from where you are now.

George Bulliss
09-04-2013, 09:53 AM
Probably should have closed this one the first time around...