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View Full Version : Drill chuck mounting question & Loctite 609 retaining compound.



Shade
07-22-2013, 02:02 PM
Recently I had need to remove a Jacobs 18N clone from the Morse taper arbor it was on;
the chuck had spun on the 4JT taper leaving some light galling on the arbor and inside
the chuck. That got me thinking, and that can be a scary proposition at times.

My thought and question is, why don't (or can't or shouldn't) use some Loctite 609
retaining compound on the 4JT to chuck mount to aid in not spinning it in the future?

vincemulhollon
07-22-2013, 02:20 PM
Murphys law being that once a chuck is permanently mounted never to be removable, that guarantees it'll get bent / full of grit / jammed or whatever like 5 minutes later.

If it absolutely positively won't hold when normally installed, try the old "chuck in the freezer" trick to shrink the taper and then pound it in. This has the possibility of being as permanent, if not more, than the loctite idea so its more of a second to last resort. Loctite being the last resort.

Another hilarious laugh is pounding too hard during installation, bending it, and now not being able to remove it. Not that I'm admitting having done anything.

Shade
07-22-2013, 02:36 PM
I have a 5Hp engine lathe with a 3MT tail stock; I have been
amazed on 2 occasions what that combination can break.

"Not that I'm admitting having done anything."

I am a former US Navy Snipe (engineer) If it can be broken
I can do it. We used to say nothing is Sailor-proof, we were
not always talking about machinery... :D

Shade
07-22-2013, 02:39 PM
I have a good buddy in Waukesha. I spent a lot of time around Edgerton growing up.

Jaakko Fagerlund
07-22-2013, 03:57 PM
I have a 5Hp engine lathe with a 3MT tail stock; I have been
amazed on 2 occasions what that combination can break.
And I can say that 8 kW lathe and Morse taper 5 tail stock also gives interesting..um.."work results". Not that I'm admitting having done anything.

As for the topic, I would not glue it, as it isn't supposed to be glued in the first place. There has to be something wrong with either of the taper parts or the installation procedure. Did you remember to clean the tapers with isopropanol or similar solvent to remove any grease like fingerprints?

Shade
07-22-2013, 05:02 PM
As for the topic, I would not glue it, as it isn't supposed to be glued in the first place. There has to be something wrong with either of the taper parts or the installation procedure. Did you remember to clean the tapers with isopropanol or similar solvent to remove any grease like fingerprints?
I dunno, I got the chuck and arbor with the lathe; both are Chinese import tools.
I also have a real Jacobs chuck on a real Jacobs arbor. Those were mated properly.

macona
07-22-2013, 05:40 PM
try the old "chuck in the freezer" trick to shrink the taper and then pound it in. This has the possibility of being as permanent, if not more, than the loctite idea so its more of a second to last resort. Loctite being the last resort.


Chuck in the OVEN, not freezer. You could put the arbor in the freezer but it is frowned on because moisture can condense on the taper when putting it in causing it to rust later.

Heat the chuck in the oven to about 300. Drop it on the arbor and let it cool. It will not come off.

Ironwoodsmith
07-22-2013, 06:02 PM
Heat the chuck in the oven to about 300. Drop it on the arbor and let it cool. It will not come off.

Does that mean that you can't get it off if you want to without damaging it? Joe

snipe
07-22-2013, 06:43 PM
Try lapping the taper to the chuck, That should give a good mating surface.

vpt
07-22-2013, 07:22 PM
Could always tack weld it to the arbor. :D

Shade
07-22-2013, 07:29 PM
Could always tack weld it to the arbor. :D

Trust me I was eyeing up the Tig welder....

Black_Moons
07-22-2013, 08:17 PM
Chuck in the OVEN, not freezer. You could put the arbor in the freezer but it is frowned on because moisture can condense on the taper when putting it in causing it to rust later.

Heat the chuck in the oven to about 300. Drop it on the arbor and let it cool. It will not come off.

Once some rust forms, tapers lock REAL hard :)

Why bother with glue when a drop of water will work just as well.

sasquatch
07-22-2013, 08:30 PM
I have an old (40's) Canadian blower and forge 15 inch drill press i restored.
The taper on the drill was screwed, marked up badly. First i touched it up lightly with a fine flat file . I bought a new Rohm chuck, but it just wouldn't stay on, so yes i lock tighted it on, been on there two years now, and still on after some tough drilling.

J Tiers
07-22-2013, 09:55 PM
I happily loctited the 2MT socket of the cheezy ancient taiwanese Buffalo Brand/Western Auto/whatever drill press I used to use. It's still out in the shed and gets used sometimes. Can be removed... the spindle MT socket is not so hot, it must have never gotten finish ground after it was rough turned.

Any other option for the chuck Jacobs taper will be harder to remove than loctite.

But jacobs arbors aren't that expensive, you can replace them, you know.

Rich Carlstedt
07-22-2013, 09:55 PM
In the old days, They drilled through the chuck body and chamfered the hole, then drilled and tapped the arbor/spindle with a left hand thread.
Then a LH flat head screw would keep it form dropping off.
Some hand drills ( Milwaukee ?) are/were made this way.
Rich