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KiddZimaHater
10-11-2013, 08:48 PM
Can you guys recommend an easy-to-use, basic 2D CAD software that's got a pretty easy learning curve?
I just want to take my ugly hand drawn prints, and make them look (somewhat) professional.
I've tried Sketchup, but I didn't like it so I uninstalled it.
What's good, easy, and simple enough to just make prints.

lakeside53
10-11-2013, 10:29 PM
Windows Visio 2010 or 2013. Amazing program... I use it for everything from "tiny" to importing and rework of gigantic Autocad files.

If you want a steeper learning curve - Draftsight is free and a great alternative to AutoCAD.

SGW
10-11-2013, 10:59 PM
Another free 2D AutoCAD look-alike is ProgeCAD 2009 Smart!. It's got a learning curve, but I didn't find it too onerous. I bought an AutoCAD LT "how to use" book, started at the beginning, did the exercises and examples, and after about 3 chapters suddenly "got" the AutoCAD way of viewing the world. With that fundamental understanding, it suddenly became a lot easier. There is a considerable amount of stuff I don't know about the program, but I know enough to get by and do what I want to do.

Evan
10-11-2013, 10:59 PM
Go to this link and you can try out a bunch, all free.

http://sourceforge.net/directory/os:windows/?q=2d%20cad

Jaakko Fagerlund
10-12-2013, 02:18 AM
LibreCAD has been working for me at home.

Firecracker
10-12-2013, 03:59 AM
+1 for draftsight.

Owain

ptjw7uk
10-12-2013, 04:08 AM
+2 for draftsight.
Peter

brian Rupnow
10-12-2013, 07:38 AM
#3 for Draftsight. An excellent free 2D cad program that will do pretty well anything AutoCAD 14 will.---Brian

Evan
10-12-2013, 11:11 AM
I do not recommend anything that works like AutoCAD. AutoCAD is the "standard" but it has a nasty learning curve.

Spookydad
10-12-2013, 11:40 AM
Another free 2D AutoCAD look-alike is ProgeCAD 2009 Smart!. It's got a learning curve, but I didn't find it too onerous. I bought an AutoCAD LT "how to use" book, started at the beginning, did the exercises and examples, and after about 3 chapters suddenly "got" the AutoCAD way of viewing the world. With that fundamental understanding, it suddenly became a lot easier. There is a considerable amount of stuff I don't know about the program, but I know enough to get by and do what I want to do.

I have been using this program for many years and I find that I keep coming back to it, even after trying newer, more powerful packages. It runs exactly like old school AutoCAD and has all the keyboard shortcuts that I know. I can draw faster with the keyboard shortcuts that the fancy mouse based tools. Mind you, the first CAD package that I used was AutoCAD 1.4 (not 14!)

Dr Stan
10-12-2013, 01:44 PM
+4 for Draftsight

Its compatibility with AutoCAD makes it particularly a good choice.

lazlo
10-12-2013, 02:01 PM
I do not recommend anything that works like AutoCAD. AutoCAD is the "standard" but it has a nasty learning curve.

Likewise. Draftsight is almost an exact AutoCAD copy. If you're not comfortable with a thin vector graphics veneer over a CP/M program, Draftsight/Autocad will be very painful to learn. :)

Mike Amick
10-12-2013, 02:38 PM
I notice that most guys that use AutoCad type programs were taught in a classroom
environment. There are exceptions that bulldog'd through the learning curve on their own, but
I honestly think they are the exception. And my hat is off to them.

I am not at the stage where I need these programs, but I do play with Sketchup. Its the
closest thing to wow I have found and this forum has its own Sketchup guru (Evan). So
when I am ready I will be picking his brain.

Tom Curlee
10-12-2013, 03:23 PM
You might try Siemens Sold Edge 2D. Their 3D CAD package is around $8K, but they give away their 2D package for free. I've been using it for the last few weeks for simple 2D mechanical design that I export via dxf to CamBam. Seems to work OK, but I'm not sure on the learning curve. I have some AutoCAD background, so that helps. It seems to do everything I need so far, just somewhat different than AutoCAD. I see that there are a number of tutorials for Solid Edge 2D on line, so that will help. Give it a try.

Tom


Can you guys recommend an easy-to-use, basic 2D CAD software that's got a pretty easy learning curve?
I just want to take my ugly hand drawn prints, and make them look (somewhat) professional.
I've tried Sketchup, but I didn't like it so I uninstalled it.
What's good, easy, and simple enough to just make prints.

LKeithR
10-12-2013, 11:03 PM
I do not recommend anything that works like AutoCAD. AutoCAD is the "standard" but it has a nasty learning curve.

Boy, I'm with Evan on this one. Anything that walks, talks and acts like AutoCAD is a b*tch to learn! I've tried several different programs over the years and gave up on all of them. AutoCAD is an immensely powerful program but it's also cumbersome and complicated. Anyone I know who uses it successfully has either used it for many years and stepped up through the many upgrades or has spent 6 months to a year in a classroom learning how to use it. Any of the clones I've seen are just as difficult to learn.

For years now I've used a little program called DeltaCad. It's not free but at 40 bucks US I think it's well worth the money. It does take a bit of time to learn to use it effectively but compared to AutoCAD it's still a breeze. Highly recommended...

http://www.deltacad.com

lakeside53
10-13-2013, 12:43 AM
That why I suggested Visio... and I use Draftsight (when I have to..).

Spookydad
10-13-2013, 01:13 AM
I notice that most guys that use AutoCad type programs were taught in a classroom
environment. There are exceptions that bulldog'd through the learning curve on their own, but
I honestly think they are the exception. And my hat is off to them.

I am not at the stage where I need these programs, but I do play with Sketchup. Its the
closest thing to wow I have found and this forum has its own Sketchup guru (Evan). So
when I am ready I will be picking his brain.

I have found that having been taught the AutoCAD way of seeing the world, learning programs like Sketchup have been very difficult for me. It wasn't until I stopped trying to make Sketchup behave like AutoCAD that I started getting anywhere. It is truly 2 completely different ways of thinking. To be honest, I still don't quite trust Sketchup to be accurate when it comes to dimensions. Sloppy drawing techniques can lead to snaps that look right but aren't quite in the same place. Later boolean operations can have wild results when encountering these glitches. These can take a long time to track down. At least with AutoCAD, a snap is a snap!

Evan
10-13-2013, 03:51 PM
SketchUp is capable of doing very accurate dimensions. The secret is simple. Always enter the dimensions of anything you draw using the keyboard to put the value in the dimension window. This is the same as any cad program so once you figure that out the rest is easy. The value window is very handy as you can use any measuring system you wish by simply following the dimension with a key letter. Other special tricks are also available, all in the same window, such as producing arrays, both linear and angular.

In SketchUp a snap is a snap too. But, you must pay attention to the tiny round coloured circle at the tip of the mouse pointer. That tells you what it is snapping to.

Also, once you have produced a shape without accurate dimension you can simply use the entity box to enter the precise value such as the diameter of a circle. One of the important tricks in SketchUp is to make everything into a group, even if it is only a single shape. That prevents anything else from changing anything. You can still snap to it.

peter76
10-13-2013, 05:23 PM
I use Qcad, www.qcad.org , most of the time; very basic and very simple, but it does the job very well.
The basic program is free, open source, but if you want some more functionality ( among other dwg support ), you can buy a cheap plugin.
Also it runs on Windows, Mac and Linux.

Regards, Peter

bobm4360
10-13-2013, 07:15 PM
I use Deltacad as well. No school needed, imports dxf & dwg also, Cheep!

Regards,
Bob

Dr Stan
10-13-2013, 08:29 PM
Well maybe l'm an exception, but I've had a total of 2 days of AutoCAD training. Before that I was a board draftsman. There are lots of tutorials and lots of books available to help learn AutoCAD. IMHO it's better to learn the industry standard from the get go rather than spending time on something that is not as powerful.

EVguru
10-14-2013, 05:33 AM
The electronic component dsitributor RS (formerly RS Components, formerly Radio Spares if you're old enough!) is giving away free unlimited versions of a PCB design package (which we're now using at work) and recently a CAD package.

I've not actually tried it yet.


Welcome to DesignSpark Mechanical the home of FREE professional 3D design software
At DesignSpark we love helping engineers create world-changing products. It's why we've made our new 3D Design Tool available to all engineers and designers as a FREE download.
DesignSpark Mechanical is packed with time-saving features to help you design more easily, quickly and creatively than ever before.
■Produce highly detailed dimensioned worksheets
■Remove bottlenecks by making amendments and additions to your design in seconds, rather than waiting for the CAD department to rework in history-based CAD tools
■Combine your creation with off-the-shelf components from RS Components and the Allied Electronics 3D library
■Create geometry easily with powerful and intuitive gesture-based modelling, no need to be a CAD expert
■And best of all, it's completely free! This is not a cut down version of an expensive product or software with a time-limited license.

http://www.designspark.com/eng/page/mechanical

ironmonger
10-14-2013, 07:30 AM
I have found that having been taught the AutoCAD way of seeing the world, learning programs like Sketchup have been very difficult for me. It wasn't until I stopped trying to make Sketchup behave like AutoCAD that I started getting anywhere. It is truly 2 completely different ways of thinking. To be honest, I still don't quite trust Sketchup to be accurate when it comes to dimensions. Sloppy drawing techniques can lead to snaps that look right but aren't quite in the same place. Later boolean operations can have wild results when encountering these glitches. These can take a long time to track down. At least with AutoCAD, a snap is a snap!

+1 Spookydad

I learned Autocad on Version 10. Old fart... but I have similar reservations about Sketchup. I find the geometric handles in autocad and it's clones to be much easier to grasp. The learning curve with autocad is just that.

The last remaining hurdle to old-school autocad users was paper space/model space. When version 2000 was released I felt that they got that part right. Same for Progecad.

As the OP was refering to 2D programs, autocad or it's clones are the most comfortable for me. I use Progecad at home, which is based on the Intellicad engine. Almost as good as autocad but cheaper by leaps and bounds. I still draw some, and a licensed version was a necessity. Progecad was the choice because of it's handling of PDF drawing files.

If sketchup could only handle geometry as well as autocad, I would buy the pro version of that.... The money is still in the weasel sack as of now..

paul

jmarkwolf
10-14-2013, 08:04 AM
I've been using AutoCad since v2.6 (DOS version, 1987), and still use it (actually Autocad LT, but still very powerful) all the time at work and home.

I first starting using it design printed circuit boards, and now use it for everything from floor planning to mechanical parts. Most recently, I'm using it for the electrical layout of my new 28ft x 30ft 2-story garage.

I've tried migrating to other CAD packages (TurboCad most notably, available at Staples) when there is an AutoCad price increase, but always come back to Autocad. I'll usually spring for the cost of the latest version of Acad LT every half-dozen years or so.

While there are numerous ways to do things in AutoCad, I find that 99% of my drawings use only a dozen commands, the first 5 of which are dead simple:

1. Draw line
2. Draw circle
3. Draw rectangle
4. Draw text
5. Trim
6. Draw Arc (multiple variants, find one you like and stick with it)
7. Extend
8. Fillet
9. Offset
10. Place dimension
11. Place Leader
12. Draw line relative from current point at specified length and angle (keyboard command)

I also make heavy use of the snap features (snap to end-of-line, snap to mid-line, and snap to center, etc.).

Whichever CAD program you try to use, concentrate on these few commands. It will be a much shorter learning curve and they will probably serve for 99% of your drawing needs as well.

Dr Stan
10-14-2013, 08:30 AM
I've been using AutoCad since v2.6 (DOS version, 1987), and still use it (actually Autocad LT, but still very powerful) all the time at work and home.

V 2.0 for me. Guess that makes me a VERY old fart. :) My first attempt to learn AutoCAD was not fun as I did not even have a mouse. The computer was a then state of the art 8086 running DOS. One either used the cursor keys or the XY coordinates. I wanted to throw the computer out a 2nd story window.

Barrington
10-14-2013, 08:56 AM
The electronic component dsitributor RS (formerly RS Components, formerly Radio Spares if you're old enough!) is giving away free unlimited versions of a PCB design package (which we're now using at work) and recently a CAD package.

I've not actually tried it yet.

http://www.designspark.com/eng/page/mechanicalDesign Spark Mechanical is a free version of 'SpaceClaim' which looks to be pretty good. (It won't run without registering though.)

SpaceClaim: http://www.spaceclaim.com

System Requirements: http://www.spaceclaim.com/en/Support/SystemRequirements.aspx

It's seems a little fussy about video hardware - it doesn't like some older stuff. They provide a program to check if your system is up to it:-

http://files.spaceclaim.com/DxDiagTool.exe

Probably worth running this before wasting a 450MB download (half of which is DotNet libraries) and installing it.

Cheers

.

ironmonger
10-14-2013, 09:59 AM
<<snip>>
While there are numerous ways to do things in AutoCad, I find that 99% of my drawings use only a dozen commands, the first 5 of which are dead simple:

1. Draw line
2. Draw circle
3. Draw rectangle
4. Draw text
5. Trim
6. Draw Arc (multiple variants, find one you like and stick with it)
7. Extend
8. Fillet
9. Offset
10. Place dimension
11. Place Leader
12. Draw line relative from current point at specified length and angle (keyboard command)

I also make heavy use of the snap features (snap to end-of-line, snap to mid-line, and snap to center, etc.).

Whichever CAD program you try to use, concentrate on these few commands. It will be a much shorter learning curve and they will probably serve for 99% of your drawing needs as well.

I agree totally.
I taught beginning Autocad from release 10 on through ver 2009... and one pertinent fact regarding the computerized drawing process remains and I explained it to my students when they entered the class.

"If you can't draw when you get get here you will leave not being able to draw, but you will do it very accurately" :<)

crawl walk run


paul

lazlo
10-14-2013, 11:38 AM
"If you can't draw when you get get here you will leave not being able to draw, but you will do it very accurately" :<)l

It's an interface thing, not whether you can draft :)

Most of the AutoCAD wizards I know use shell commands a lot. It's a primitive (DOS era) menu system -- the menus are hot keys for shell commands.

Solidworks, by contrast, has a beautiful, modern interface. Menu hierarchies where appropriate, very efficient use of the mouse keys. Combine that with parametric 3D modelling (versus Old School 2D drafting, a la AutoCAD), and you have something pretty great.

DeltaCAD looks pretty nice, by the way! Simple, but modern interface. Pure 2D drafting (which some folks prefer)...

ironmonger
10-14-2013, 06:41 PM
Like so many things, tis not where you are but how you got there.

For whatever reason, Autocad is the defacto standard drafting program in the architectural world, and although I have been retired for five years now, I suspect it still is.

As nice as Solidworks may be, it was never inexpensive, and for a person to purchase it for personal use would be a little excessive. At the stage of life I'm at, I personally don't need another interface to learn.

I suppose that is why Sketchup is so troubling to me. Evan states you need only enter the exact dimension... which to me anyway, implies that you know what that dimension is. With the programs I use, one can select a piece of geometry or a location and begin a line or enter a geometric object at keyboard entered distance or angle from that point. Any cad program that doesn't work relatively or make it easy to find that function if it has it, is too foreign to me to bother with.

If you make a mathematically correct sketch on paper an use sketchup to render it, all well and good. I find the process of creating a drawing in autocad to be intuitive for me at this point. I could not find the geometric tools to work that way in sketchup that I have in autocad and it's clones.

And I still maintain that if you can't draw, ie a sketch with dimensions and geometry, Autocad or any cad program won't help you a bit. I had students that could not draft manually, and they expected that cad would do that for them... I can't imaging that happening... and it did not.

The large investment of time required to become a competent cad operator dictates using one system or at least a similar systems to become proficient on. Which is why the OP came here in the first place. Before purchasing a Cad program, if you are really interested in Cad, please sign up at your local technical school for a few classes before you commit to learning an entire system. If you have no prior experience, the training will be invaluable.

paul

Mike Amick
10-14-2013, 09:29 PM
Signing up for a couple of classes would be GREAT ! .. I live in San Diego and have many
local colleges and I have looked for Machining and Cad classes .. and " a couple of classes "
is not available. They are multi year full blown degree's. I would love to take a few week
or even a few months class.

LKeithR
10-14-2013, 09:37 PM
...IMHO it's better to learn the industry standard from the get go rather than spending time on something that is not as powerful.

That's all well and good if you're planning a career path that involves designing and engineering, etc. If you're starting late or just want to be a casual user I can't imagine why you'd want to spend the money or waste a lot of time learning AutoCAD. I don't disagree that it's the industry standard but not all of us want to go that far with our drafting. In the end, though, it's an individual choice. If you can learn AutoCad more power to you, and, no offense Doc, but I do find it hard to believe that anybody could be proficient in AutoCAD with only a couple days of training--for sure most people aren't going to pick it up that quick...

Evan
10-15-2013, 01:00 AM
I have tried at least a dozen CAD programs, 2D and 3D. I don't much like any of them although I do know how to use them all. SketchUp is the first one I have found that I really like. As far as "hot keys", SketchUp has a large number of them. The real CAD functions are all there but they are somewhat hidden. It's certainly better than AutoCad but you still need to pay attention to the user manual and some tutorials. Both are readily available online.

Here are the keyboard commands:

SketchUp Keyboard Shortcuts
Common Rules:

Ctrl+ Windows Command
Letter The commands which are very often used
Alt+ The commands which are often used
Shift+ 1."anti" commands;2.The commands which have dialog window
F2-F8 Different view

Edit -> Clear Selection Ctrl+T
Edit -> Copy Ctrl+C
Edit -> Cut Ctrl+X
Edit -> Erase Delete
Edit -> Erase Construction Geometry Alt+E
Edit -> Group G
Edit -> UnGroup Shift+G
Edit -> Hide H
Edit -> UnHide Shift+H
Edit -> UnHide All Shift+A
Edit -> Hide Construction Geometry Q
Edit -> UnHide Construction Geometry Shift+Q
Edit -> UnHide Last Shift+L
Edit -> Make Component Now not listed in keyboard command

Page -> Add Alt+A
Page -> Delete Alt+D
Page -> List Alt+L
Page -> Next Page PageDown
Page -> Previous Page PageUp
Page -> Update Alt+U

Rendering/Wireframe Alt+1
Rendering/Hidden line Alt+2
Rendering/Shaded Alt+3
Rendering/Shaded with patterns Alt+4
Rendering/Transparency T

SketchUp/Context Help Alt+F1

Tools -> Arc A
Tools -> Axes Y
Tools -> Circle C
Tools -> Customize -> Keyboard Shift+K
Tools -> Erase E
Tools -> Freehand F
Tools -> Line L
Tools -> Measure Alt+M
Tools -> Move M
Tools -> Offset O
Tools -> Paint X
Tools -> Polygon P
Tools -> Protractor Alt+P
Tools -> Push/Pull U
Tools -> Rectangle R
Tools -> Rotate Alt+R
Tools -> Scale S
Tools -> Select Space

View -> Components Shift+O
View -> Layers Shift+E
View -> Material Browser Shift+M
View -> Perspective V
View -> Position Camera Alt+C
View -> Preferences Shift+P
View -> Toggle Shadows Alt+S
View -> Shadows Shift+S
View -> Show Hidden Geometry Alt+H
View -> Standard Views -> Top F2
View -> Standard Views -> Front F3
View -> Standard Views -> Left F4
View -> Standard Views -> Right F5
View -> Standard Views -> Back F6
View -> Standard Views -> Bottom F7
View -> Standard Views -> Iso F8
View -> Tools -> Orbit Middle Botton
View -> Tools -> Orbit Alt+O
View -> Tools -> Pan Shift+Middle Botton Shift+Middle Botton
View -> Tools -> Walk W
View -> Undo View Change Tab
View -> Zoom -> Zoom Alt+Z
View -> Zoom -> Zoom Middle Botton
View -> Zoom -> Window Z
View -> Zoom -> Extents Shift+Z

masimec
10-15-2013, 01:03 AM
I used AutoSketch, it was really easy!

batt-man
10-15-2013, 03:36 AM
Another good autocad clone is www.nanocad.com

It does require registration to get a license key but they do not sell your email address on or hassle you all the time to buy something. Only time i've received email from them is when there's a new version available.

I just like it because i was a long-time autocad user and although it's not my day job i find this very easy to use with a lot of functionality

Usual disclaimer : no affiliation with the nanocad company, just a happy customer....

Cheers
Batt.

John Stevenson
10-15-2013, 04:30 AM
CAD is like religion, in fact it is a religion to some.
There is no one program suits all - period - because everyone is different.

If you took 10 users on this forum, trained then in whateverCAD and then showed them ow to customise the layout which most can be enabled, then you would get 10 different users all thinking their layout was best.

And it would be for them.

Keith makes a very valid point above where he says why use the industry standard program when you are only part time. Very valid if you use it that infrequent that you have to relearn even the basics every time you use it.

CAD doesn't make you a better designer, you still need the ideas and overall view in your mind before you put either pen to paper or mouse to the wheel. It does help in speed and repetitious moves.

There are also two basic ways to draw and these are mainly based on age and experience of the drafter.

Usual modern way to teach and draw is called Absolute where a given point is 0,0 often the bottom left corner so all moves are plus moves.
Everything is taken from this point. So if you have a square of 8" and on the right hand side there is a hole 1/2" in from the side you will draw this line 7 1/2" from 0,0

The other way is called Relative where every entity is draw relative to another. Without realising it, that is the way you draw on a drawing board with construction lines and its far easier for old farts who were board trained to pick up.

Long short is you need to do a bit of homework as to whats out there as regards features, ease of learning, cost etc.
Download the demo and spend at least 3 nights doing the tutorials. Do not flit from one to the other. I know it takes time but it will be well rewarded in the long run.

Circlip
10-15-2013, 05:40 AM
No matter which one you go for, unless you keep using it regularly you'll be going through the learning curve regularly.

Regards Ian.

LKeithR
10-15-2013, 02:15 PM
...There are also two basic ways to draw and these are mainly based on age and experience of the drafter.

Usual modern way to teach and draw is called Absolute where a given point is 0,0 often the bottom left corner so all moves are plus moves.
Everything is taken from this point. So if you have a square of 8" and on the right hand side there is a hole 1/2" in from the side you will draw this line 7 1/2" from 0,0

The other way is called Relative where every entity is draw relative to another. Without realising it, that is the way you draw on a drawing board with construction lines and its far easier for old farts who were board trained to pick up.

I've never had any luck entering coordinates when using my CAD program. I find the easiest way to do things is to use parallel lines. Draw a vertical and horizontal base line and start setting off other features with parallel lines. Use trims and splits to break it down to the various components you need. Doesn't take very long at all to rough in a bunch of objects. I guess this would fit the definition of "relative".

One trick I learned is to use lots of layers and colours to differentiate parts of a drawing--makes it easy to separate items for later editing.

I've had no formal training--except a little bit in school back in the early 60s--but I've spent many hours doing "board" drawings. The first time I sat down at a computer and used a CAD program was a revelation for me--I did a lot of "design on the fly" work and changing paper drawings was a major headache. CAD made things so much easier...

Dr Stan
10-15-2013, 02:27 PM
If you can learn AutoCad more power to you, and, no offense Doc, but I do find it hard to believe that anybody could be proficient in AutoCAD with only a couple days of training--for sure most people aren't going to pick it up that quick...

That's 2 days of training and lots of time teaching myself on the computer.

Dr Stan
10-15-2013, 02:27 PM
did a lot of "design on the fly" work and changing paper drawings was a major headache. CAD made things so much easier...

Amen says the choir

CCWKen
10-15-2013, 03:02 PM
I'm too old to learn a new language or vocabulary for CAD just to make a drawing of something I may make once so my project folders are still full of napkins, inkjet paper or pages copied out of a book. If I can't do it with Windows Paint then it will take too long to draw and I go back to pencil and paper. :)

WilliamG
10-17-2013, 09:40 PM
Unsure what I am doing wrong but I can't seem to download DraftSight into my system. Using XP Pro downloading Windows 32 bit file to C:\Program Files\DraftSight32.exe (123mb prog). For what ever reason the program hangs up on completion at the 1 second time left and never finishes...!!

So whats going on with that?

Welcome your suggestions!

Bill

lakeside53
10-17-2013, 09:58 PM
Try turning off your firewall for the download, or the firewall at your router. The DS downloader may be expecting a response on some blocked port number.

LKeithR
10-17-2013, 11:28 PM
That's 2 days of training and lots of time teaching myself on the computer.

Oh thank God you posted this---for a while there I thought you were superhuman...:D:D

WilliamG
10-18-2013, 07:39 AM
Try turning off your firewall for the download, or the firewall at your router. The DS downloader may be expecting a response on some blocked port number.

Ok so I turned off my firewall and antivirus and tried to download "DraftSight" again still no joy! So I switched to another program I use and tried to upgrade same thing the download hangs up right at the end. Oh poop I hate silly computer glitches!

Bill

Evan
10-18-2013, 02:45 PM
Use a downloader program. The one I use is Free Download Manager. I has all sorts of cool downloading feature, even the ability to change download speed. That is known as "traffic shaping" and allows you to download something in the background without tying up your system.

http://www.freedownloadmanager.org/download.htm

lazlo
10-18-2013, 07:12 PM
Ok so I turned off my firewall and antivirus and tried to download "DraftSight" again still no joy!

Do you have Javascript turned off?

Here's the direct download page:

http://www.3ds.com/products-services/draftsight/download-draftsight/