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EVguru
10-13-2013, 02:39 PM
Ages ago, I bought a video camera to shoot some informational footage. It didn't happen of course and the camera nearly turned into another of those never used gadgets.

However, I have started making some and even bought a second camera to avoid changing setups so often (and to go HD).

Some are pure Morini "How to" but often there is machining content.

Please take a look and give (constructive please!) criticism; http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

adnbr
10-13-2013, 03:11 PM
I just had a quick look at your "Making a clutch tool" video and it was good. The only comment from me would be to get closer in on some of the longer segments of milling away at the metal - let me see what's going on at the cutter, there's nothing else going on in the shot!

The 180 degree v-block trick was news to me, so I learned something!

Mike Amick
10-13-2013, 03:12 PM
I only watched the first one .. but .. I think you did fine.
You would be fine not changing anything .. but .. if you want some rough critique

Just a hair more light might have improved it. (maybe one of those reflector screens)
The pace was just a hair slow

I actually can't think of anything else .. really .. you did a nice job

I really liked your method of flipping the rod 180 .. I'll remember that.
and the finished product was beautiful

Mike

Mike279
10-13-2013, 03:54 PM
I like the video and since you are asking for us to be a critic lets see what we can find. I think you went too long on the machine set up. Most people will not have a machine like yours. Getting closer shots is key so we can see what you are doing. I like your tool but wonder if the handle is too long as that much torque probably won't be needed. And when I make up tools like that I like to put a sleeve over the working end, to hold the tool in place while turning it. I also liked the V block flip. Nice job. Mike

balor
10-13-2013, 05:17 PM
Picture quality is very good. Lighting is fine for me. Being critical...you did ask!... Not a lot wrong with your approach but I would say that there is too much happening off camera at times eg. in the measuring for the milling depth etc. A pre-prepared diagram to just show the calculations would have helped to both explain and fill the long pause when there was nothing much happening on the video. Maybe a little more planning to make sure the viewer is always engaged.

Well done though and great to see someone working on Morinis.

Baz
10-13-2013, 06:06 PM
Well done. You avoided the big No-No of the 5 minutes video of self droning on and on about trivia that has me wishing youtube had a better fast forward mechanism. At least you kept the camera on the machine. Have to admit I had to fast forward to see what the v-block trick was then a quick look at the end result and done. Machining is mostly a slow process and does not need to be shown in full when nothing unusual is happening.
I assume you use a BP but when people have less common equipment I do like a scan over the kit as it is often the only pictures available on the net.

wierdscience
10-13-2013, 08:23 PM
I think you did fine,keep them coming!

EVguru
10-14-2013, 05:00 AM
Many many thanks for the comments so far, just the sort of thing I was looking for. I'll try and take some of them on board.

Filming yourself is tricky. One problem is not being able to see what you're shooting and I can do something about that. I have a bunch of 15"LCD monitors that were being thrown out at work. They were used on a SCADA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCADA) system and don't have stands becuase I dismantled them to create wall mounts. I bought a cheap converter box that goes from composite or S-video to VGA and also snagged a tripod from a cheap laser level (we'd bought them to strip for the laser modules). I may even make a video of setting up the monitor and stand.

As for pace, I need a director and a script editor, or even a script! Filming the videos is making me think about the methods a bit more which is good and I sometimes do a dummy run, but I'm usually making it up as I go along.

EVguru
10-14-2013, 05:08 AM
I like your tool but wonder if the handle is too long as that much torque probably won't be needed. And when I make up tools like that I like to put a sleeve over the working end, to hold the tool in place while turning it.

The nuts can be tight enough that the studs sometimes break loose in the clutch hub, so the handle length was a deliberate choice (overtightening and rust are usually to blame). The tool wouldn't fit with a sleeve, as the nuts are flush with the pressure cover.

ptjw7uk
10-14-2013, 05:09 AM
Nice videos, very to the point.
On the clutch adjusting tool I have always felt they needed a shroud around the outside to get better alignment makes it easier until the stud shows through.

Just my 2c worth.

peter

MrSleepy
10-14-2013, 05:30 AM
Where are Robert and Lisa ?...

Rob

Mike279
10-14-2013, 08:12 AM
I see I missed the first video that explains why you have the design of the the longer handle and no sleeve. Looking at the machining video the clutch is already apart. I should have watched that one first. Mike

EVguru
10-14-2013, 09:02 AM
Where are Robert and Lisa ?...

Safely on disc and DVD.

For some reason Scrapheap Challenge Series 8 has disappeared online (other than bittorrents), although it's still being shown on More 4.

Tony
10-14-2013, 09:06 AM
I liked it. great quality / lighting. Vblock tip was great. Have never seen one of those quick lock collet chucks. in fact
its been a while since I've even seen endmills (or slot drills!) with threads. They tend to be more expensive? The fact
that they can't slip and won't lose Z depth is nice.

Boucher
10-14-2013, 10:10 AM
Paul, the video was very well done. It was almost like getting to visit someone elses shop. It is interesting to see where and how others locate their Vice. The threaded end mills are not for me but the tool is interesting to be acquainted with. Using the v-block to relocate the tool 180 was a new trick for me also. I have used the Square and Hex 5C collet blocks similarly. John Stevensons ER collet blocks work even better as the nut can function as the work stop when set against the vice.
Keep the Videos coming.

EVguru
10-14-2013, 10:37 AM
Have never seen one of those quick lock collet chucks. in fact
its been a while since I've even seen endmills (or slot drills!) with threads. They tend to be more expensive?

Loads around as surplus and NOS over here and they're available from the usual far eastern budget suppliers. I've not really compared prices, but I don't think they're much more expensive. Some people make up screwed shank holders for plain/FC3/Weldon shank cutters, centre/spotting drills, etc. and I recently saw a ready made ER collet chuck with screwed shank to fit an autolock.


It is interesting to see where and how others locate their Vice.

Quite a lot of the time I don't use a vice and just clamp direct to the table, or on parallels. If I want to mill the edge of a bit of plate, I'll often clamp it down to the table on top of a bit of cardboard (cereal packet), run the cutter just through the surface of the cardboard and mill away. It's easy to add and remove clamps as you go for clearance.

The vice is a Vertex K6 I got cheap from the clearance table at Chronos Tools (I can drop into their place on the way to work). It came with a swivel base that had two of the mounting ears broken off, which is why it was very cheap. There's not a lot of clearance for nuts, so I use the clamp set.