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radkins
10-16-2013, 03:09 PM
Need an apple expert's opinion!

I had really good luck with my apple trees this years and all have been harvested but a dwarf Granny Smith which has yet to rippen, sometime around the middle to the last on November here in zone 6 according to rippening charts. This is the first year I have had a real crop on this little tree and it is loaded with huge Green Granny Smiths but we have freezing weather coming in about a week (lows in the mid to low 20's possible) these apples are still at least 2 to 3 weeks away from even an early harvest, can they stand this freezing weather? If not I made a mistake planting this tree because it's rare to make it into the middle of November without several hard freezes even in this moderate zone.

dp
10-16-2013, 03:44 PM
Those apples should be off the tree by September. Are you located in a deep valley with low direct sun? If you can't get effective smudge pots out you're probably looking at a lot of apple sauce and cider. They won't survive the freeze.

Here's a link about frozen apples. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/facts/00-003.htm#frozen

There's good info too about pruning to hasten the ripening.

sasquatch
10-16-2013, 05:29 PM
Radkins, i think it would help IF you posted your'e location ?

duckman
10-16-2013, 06:52 PM
How big or tall are your trees , can you cover them so moisture stays off the fruit that usually keeps them from freezing, uncover during the day and cover them at night.

radkins
10-16-2013, 07:05 PM
Radkins, i think it would help IF you posted your'e location ?

I am East Tn but I thought I covered that when I mentioned we are in hardiness zone 6, but you're right I should have been a little more specific. After checking the link posted by DP my fears have been confirmed and I guess we will just harvest them and use for them cooking apples, they are definitely not ready to eat yet raw and it looks as they never will be.

dp
10-16-2013, 10:54 PM
Those are not the most enjoyable noshing apples at the best of times - they're mostly used for pies. Probably not a better apple out there for that purpose. They have a serious pucker factor.

J Tiers
10-17-2013, 08:55 AM
Yep, CLEARLY a pie apple, although I HAVE run into a very few people who hate sweeter apples, and prefer very acid types like the Granny Smith as eating apples.

dp
10-17-2013, 11:04 AM
Just did a bit of research on the Granny Smith apple. I've been driving past orchards of them for years near my second home in the Okanogan valley in north central Washington state without really thinking about where they originated from (people there talk about apples the way folks in Florida talk about stock car racing). Turns out they're an accidental cultivar from Oz, and that every tree is traceable back to a single tree outside Granny Smith's kitchen in NSW. It has become one of the most successful apples ever.

Euph0ny
10-17-2013, 11:36 AM
I really like Granny Smiths for eating, but I like the "tart" taste. Good for pie too.

For the future, maybe consider a medlar tree - a sort of half-cultivated relative of the apple. The fruit can only be eaten after a frost, because they don't sweeten up without one. The trees are very hardy.

michigan doug
10-17-2013, 01:10 PM
Most apples will continue to ripen after picking. This can be manipulated somewhat by how you store them, and at what temperature.

Ethylene gas will accelerate the ripening, so storing in a paper bag may help. Bananas also produce ethylene, so storing a banana in the bag may push things along a bit faster.

read all about it:

http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemistryexperiments/ss/ethyleneexp.htm\



Perhaps not as good as tree ripened, but perhaps better than not ripening them any more at all by processing now.

doug

adatesman
10-17-2013, 01:25 PM
Yep, CLEARLY a pie apple, although I HAVE run into a very few people who hate sweeter apples, and prefer very acid types like the Granny Smith as eating apples.

Blasphemy! Granny Smith's are the *ONLY* apple worth eating, IMO. All others pale in comparison the the sweet yet tart, firm crunchiness of a Granny.

Not a good cider apple though.

Tilaran
10-17-2013, 02:34 PM
I prefer the Hairy R. type.:cool:
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5526/10332503885_e9f840fffc_o.jpg

michigan doug
10-17-2013, 04:16 PM
For fresh eating, one cannot beat the honeycrisp, picked from ones own tree. The ones available in the stores have been ruined for the most part. It does not keep well.

I got a fair number of apples from my two enterprise apple trees for the first time this year.

Fresh eating, they are pretty tasty. Tart enough they remind of the Granny smith. They are a little hard, and a little starchy. They make lousy awful applesauce because of the high starch.

But they are reported to get considerably sweeter after 2-3 months of storage. We will see.

doug

lynnl
10-17-2013, 04:39 PM
My favorite, hands down, are Jonathans. Almost as tart as Granny Smiths, but still a nice sharp, crisp sweetness too.
Good for eating, or pies, baking, etc.
Golden Delicious is another good choice, though a red color is more visually appealing.

Toolguy
10-17-2013, 05:07 PM
I like Red Delicious for eating raw.

flylo
10-17-2013, 06:37 PM
My wife is from between Nashville & Knoxville. They have Granny Smiths & have had no problems. Here they dig ponds on the low spots of the property to draw the frost. I don't know how many trees you have but if you have a way to keep the air moving like the 3' barn fans you should be OK. They used to buzz the orchards with aircraft all night. Good time to learn to fly! Good luck!

BigMike782
10-17-2013, 07:19 PM
I used to work for guy whos shop was next to his house and he grew some fruit.I can remember walking through the snow to get a "Johnie" off the tree and they were goooood,maybe he planted frost resistant varietys?;)

He also grew the first Matsu I ever had and Red Cheifs,look like red delicious but the size of a large softball.

adatesman
10-17-2013, 08:49 PM
There's nothing delicious about any of the Delicious varieties. Just sweet and mealy with no real flavor or crispness. My uncle has a commercial orchard, so I'm always getting new varieties to try. Yet nothing comes close to the perfection embodied by a Granny.

WhatTheFlux!
10-17-2013, 09:56 PM
Empires, or go home. ;)

Black Forest
10-18-2013, 11:05 AM
Today our local volunteer fire department came and picked all our apples. We let them have the apples to raise money. They get about three tons of apples from our orchid that bring a good price. They make apple juice from the apples. We actually buy back some of the apple juice made from our apples. It is put in 5 liter boxes and keeps for a long time. We have one tree that is famous in our area for the best tasting apples in our area. Lots of people come and ask if they can pick a few. I don't have a clue what kind of apples they are but they taste really good.

ulav8r
10-18-2013, 07:06 PM
A few years ago the wife put some Granny Smiths in the extra fridge in early November. They were stilla little on the green side. Three months later they were very good eaten raw or in pies.

radkins
10-18-2013, 09:50 PM
My wife is from between Nashville & Knoxville. They have Granny Smiths & have had no problems. Here they dig ponds on the low spots of the property to draw the frost. I don't know how many trees you have but if you have a way to keep the air moving like the 3' barn fans you should be OK. They used to buzz the orchards with aircraft all night. Good time to learn to fly! Good luck!


That's very interesting since I am about 35 miles north of Knoxville, I only have the one Granny Smith but it was loaded this year. I had to spray HEAVILY to combat Bitter Rot of which the Granny Smiths are highly susceptible to, with the disease problems and the really late ripening times I'm glad I only planted one of that variety. I have two Pristine that get ripe in early July then the Enterprise and Blushing Golden in September, I also have four Stark red Delicious that do really well but the apples are absolutely tasteless -I mean they really bland with hardly have any flavor at all.

BTW, I've been flying since '76.

Tor
10-19-2013, 05:53 AM
Tilaren, I know that tree, and if you submitted the fruit to any apple show I were judging you wouldn't get much of a rating. I'll take a longon over the rambutan, though, and a lychee as a second choice. Don't care for the seed husk in the rambutan, though all three have tasty flesh.

Haven't been in the northeast I come from once upon a time to be much of an apple expert, though when I was last back that way northern spy was a rather nice one.

lynnl
10-19-2013, 12:55 PM
Need an apple expert's opinion!

but we have freezing weather coming in about a week (lows in the mid to low 20's possible)

I didn't give that statement much thought when I first saw it, but that looks like an extremely pessimistic forecast for this early in the fall.
Perhaps you're down in a valley, subject to intense drainage cooling, but otherwise low to mid twenties would be very unusual, ie. near record setting for the Knoxville area this early.

Certainly a light frost possibly, but a hard freeze? ... that would be rare.

dp
10-19-2013, 03:54 PM
It is definitely a deep freeze coming in, and nearly nation-wide. http://www.climatedepot.com/2013/10/17/the-polar-express-is-leaving-the-station-major-cold-air-outbreak-for-most-of-the-u-s-late-next-week/

lynnl
10-19-2013, 04:26 PM
It is definitely a deep freeze coming in, and nearly nation-wide. http://www.climatedepot.com/2013/10/17/the-polar-express-is-leaving-the-station-major-cold-air-outbreak-for-most-of-the-u-s-late-next-week/

Well, we'll see. That Dr Roy Spencer is here in Huntsville, at U of Ala Hsvl. From some of the past reports in the local news emanating from there I've detected a political tinge. ...which of course does not bear on the immediate issue of an impending cold snap.

Undoubtedly colder air is on the way to the mid west and eastern US, but dipping this far south this early remains to be seen.

radkins
10-19-2013, 04:58 PM
I didn't give that statement much thought when I first saw it, but that looks like an extremely pessimistic forecast for this early in the fall.
Perhaps you're down in a valley, subject to intense drainage cooling, but otherwise low to mid twenties would be very unusual, ie. near record setting for the Knoxville area this early.

Certainly a light frost possibly, but a hard freeze? ... that would be rare.


Odd? You bet it is but on MSN weather they were calling for a low of 26 Deg here at the end of the 10 day forecast, that was a few days ago so I just checked again and now they are calling for 35 Deg so it looks like I may have a few more days yet.

dp
10-19-2013, 05:04 PM
Well, we'll see. That Dr Roy Spencer is here in Huntsville, at U of Ala Hsvl. From some of the past reports in the local news emanating from there I've detected a political tinge. ...which of course does not bear on the immediate issue of an impending cold snap.

Undoubtedly colder air is on the way to the mid west and eastern US, but dipping this far south this early remains to be seen.

I don't think the weather cares much about who is reporting it :). That is a fairly typical prognosis of what is coming up, though. Spencer is a climatologist who also happens to be a Christian (which is used against him) and also thinks (and I agree :) ) that the climate alarmism is over blown and unsupported by the science. That automatically makes it political. None of that affects weather.

lynnl
10-20-2013, 08:36 AM
I don't think the weather cares much about who is reporting it :). That is a fairly typical prognosis of what is coming up, though. Spencer is a climatologist who also happens to be a Christian (which is used against him) and also thinks (and I agree :) ) that the climate alarmism is over blown and unsupported by the science. That automatically makes it political. None of that affects weather.

No. not the weather, but the objectivity of the forecast (and his papers) is another matter.