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View Full Version : 12 awg 6/c soow power cord - what do you guys use?



lost_cause
10-29-2013, 06:05 PM
i'm looking for a piece of 12 awg 6/c cord to wire between a motor and drum switch, and my local electrical supply house doesn't have any cord with more than 4 conductors.

what do you guys use when you need something like this, and where do you get it? am i looking in the wrong place? there's one electric motor shop near me that i'm going to call tomorrow, but other than that, i can't think of where to look. my lathe looks like it just might be a piece of vinyl hose with several loose strands of wire run through, but i was hoping for something a little more elegant. i can buy a chunk of it on ebay, but i was hoping to just pick up a piece on my way home some night this week. any ideas?

MrSleepy
10-29-2013, 06:27 PM
On my equipment I use corrugated flexible conduit between motors and control boxes

ie.. http://www.screwfix.com/p/tower-corrugated-conduit-black-20mm-x-10m/50443

on paid jobs I use armoured flexible conduit...very similar but metallic.

then use single cables.

Rob

Stern
10-29-2013, 06:33 PM
Thats what I would do, get individual rires and some armourd sheath (BX) to push it all through. I only use metalic as I see no point in ever using plastic for power wiring. Also, pull an extra wire (green) for a ground, do NOT use the sheath as the ground as its not good enough (and violates codes in almost every country). I would use 5/8" or 3/4" sheath, as you wont have to fight like a madman to get all the wires through. If you want it to be really pretty, for a few extra bucks you can get liquid tight (same stuff with a plastic/rubber coating) and liquid tight connectors for the end (easier to install than BX ones, look better and add the feature of water proof to the connection).

Boucher
10-29-2013, 07:05 PM
Try an Auto-parts store. The truck trailer wire may be available in #12

atomarc
10-29-2013, 07:20 PM
I have seen two 12/3 SJO run side by side to mimick a 6 wire cord...doesn't look too funky if they're zip tied together.

Stuart

MaxHeadRoom
10-29-2013, 07:23 PM
Same as above, liquid seal flexible conduit, comes metalic or non-metalic, wired with TEW/MTW single conductor stranded.
Max.

Bob Fisher
10-29-2013, 07:49 PM
Like others said, use flexible conduit, or sealtite if you use a lot of coolant.much neater and Bette protected. Bob.

lakeside53
10-29-2013, 08:36 PM
I have a bunch of 7 conductor 12 and 10 awg SO cord. Very useful and you can buy it new. I use 1/2 and 3/4 inch Liquid-tight flexible conduit and THHN wire for most motor/machine uses.

alanganes
10-29-2013, 09:06 PM
McMaster-Carr lists 12/6 SOOW cord, p/n 7081K69 in lengths of 10, 25, 50, 100 and 250 feet. At $5.65/foot, it's not the cheap way out, however. I have bought this on a few occasions when it was the right thing for the job and mostly when someone else was paying the bill. For my own stuff, I do what some of the pother have mentioned above and do individual conductors in a length of liquid-tight or whatever.

darryl
10-29-2013, 10:35 PM
I have been known to use heavy duty extension cord for the wiring- strip the jacket to access the conductors. I once made a 6 conductor cord by laying the extra 3 conductors around the existing wrap. Doesn't look bad, and considering that it's over 1/2 inch in diameter like that, without the covering, it's still reasonably flexible. I would be highly tempted to wrap the bundle with that sticky cloth tape before putting it in the metal sheath, just to protect the rather soft feeling insulation on the individual wires.

lakeside53
10-29-2013, 11:30 PM
That breaks code in so many ways... Far easier (and safer) to just do it right.

Paul Alciatore
10-30-2013, 04:52 AM
Belden lists a number of 4 pair, #12 cables.

https://edeskv2.belden.com/Products/#s=soow%2012%20AWG&r=0

I suspect that Alpha Wire would have similar products.

If they are not in stock, any electronic supplier should be able to get them for you. Or even any decent electrician. Trouble is you may have to buy 20 to 100 feet.

But I would be tempted to use two three conductor cables and just twist them together. Or use conduit as suggested above.

vincemulhollon
10-30-2013, 10:17 AM
add the feature of water proof to the connection

Chip proof, and you're probably going to have to chip proof it somehow anyway, and inspectors can whine if you use silicone caulk to seal it, but they can't complain about legit COTS liquid tight parts.

vincemulhollon
10-30-2013, 10:33 AM
I once made a 6 conductor cord by laying the extra 3 conductors around the existing wrap

Google for a table titled something like single insulated conductor in air and compare to a table of three (or 3) conductors in a cable raceway conduit some phrases like that.

A single bare piece of 12 gauge THHN hanging out in the air can handle at least 40 amps without overheating but three of those in a conduit all generating heat and touching each other mushed together and you're limited to 30 amps (doesn't NEC say you're only permitted a 20 amp breaker on 12 gauge anyway?) Now wrap six of them all together like that and it's not simple linear but I'd wonder about it. You're probably not drawing current 24x7, probably cooler than 30C ambient, probably some cooling breezes, definitely NEC is always a bit conservative... On the other hand cheap extension cable is not high-temp rated THHN, and stranded isn't rated as high as solid, and wrapping it with tape (aka kindling) and maybe your max ambient is over 30C and there are correction factors for that...

Stern
10-30-2013, 11:03 AM
Thats the reason that 12 AWG is limited to 20 AMPs. One thing I dont mess with is power cabling safety, and when I run a 220V line for my 50 Ton press I will use over sized wiring (3HP motor listed at 18 AMP, so I will not use anything smaller than 10AWG). When you compare pricing on wire between gauges, the amount doesn't fly up that much.

bborr01
10-30-2013, 10:28 PM
What do you use 6 conductor wire for? All of my 3 phase machines use 4 conductor wire. Am I missing something?

Brian

lakeside53
10-30-2013, 10:49 PM
Some 2 speed motors.

MrSleepy
10-31-2013, 06:07 AM
What do you use 6 conductor wire for? All of my 3 phase machines use 4 conductor wire. Am I missing something?

Brian

WYE / Delta switching starting schemes...

Rob

MrSleepy
10-31-2013, 06:14 AM
Try an Auto-parts store. The truck trailer wire may be available in #12

Trailer cable (BS7655) in the UK is usually rated below 100vDC.

Not sure about in the US....So its best to check the exact specs before using it on other applications.

Rob

Rosco-P
10-31-2013, 11:56 AM
Does it have to be "rubber cord", so, sow, seow, etc.? Seems that Greenfield or liquidtite flex conduit and THHN conductors would be ideal for the application.

dian
10-31-2013, 01:07 PM
Some 2 speed motors.

why does mine need seven? dont you ground the case?

MaxHeadRoom
10-31-2013, 01:25 PM
and THHN conductors would be ideal for the application.


I find THHN a bit on the stiff side, especially when used in a flex conduit situation., I prefer TEW/MTW (Machine Tool Wire).
(THHN - General Building Wire).
Max.

lakeside53
10-31-2013, 04:23 PM
why does mine need seven? dont you ground the case?

There are many way to accomplish grounding depending on your local electrical codes. You can include the ground to the motor as you suggest, use the conduit as the ground, or the machine frame.

MaxHeadRoom
10-31-2013, 05:25 PM
I much prefer running a separate ground conductor rather than rely on conduit conections etc.
Max.

Rosco-P
10-31-2013, 08:36 PM
I find THHN a bit on the stiff side, especially when used in a flex conduit situation., I prefer TEW/MTW (Machine Tool Wire).
(THHN - General Building Wire).
Max.

MTW would be better, but THHN can bought at any big box store by the foot. Not so for MTW.