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bruto
11-02-2013, 10:42 PM
Just a little visual commentary. Nothing really to say, but thought someone might find it amusing. The other day I went to the dump (transfer station really) and on the top of the metal dumpster was the object pictured. Alas, the missing piece was gone - if it was there when thrown, it probably fell too deep to see. I should mention that the rust shown is from my leaving it in the truck when it rained. As found, it was pristine, and looks as if it might have broken on the first use. I grabbed it anyway, because it has a pipe jaw on one side, and what looks as if it might hold a round object like a wrench socket, if it doesn't break first. Price was right.

Can't say I'm greatly impressed with the quality here. http://img577.imageshack.us/img577/929/hlux.jpg

winchman
11-03-2013, 05:06 AM
It's got that swivel and several other useful parts. I would have picked it up, too.

What kind of truck is that? I don't recognize the lettering.

Tilaran
11-03-2013, 07:20 AM
The guy probably put something in it and tried to tighten it :confused:. Tools today aren't meant to be used.I see they made it a nice blue. It'll be gorgeous sitting on a bench beside the Miller inverter with the fried card. More junk.

Doozer
11-03-2013, 09:25 AM
Who is Irwin Schmirwin?

-D

bruto
11-03-2013, 10:16 AM
It's got that swivel and several other useful parts. I would have picked it up, too.

What kind of truck is that? I don't recognize the lettering.It's an 02 Chevy Silverado, nice and basic with plenty of rust. I'm still trying to figure out if there's any kind of special clamp I can make if I saw the broken portion and its mating part off flat. I could drill it for pins and make a bicycle freewheel vise, but I already drilled an old drill press vise for that, and haven't needed a freewheel vise for some years anyway. There must be something.

Mike Nash
11-03-2013, 11:06 AM
Can't you just find a big chunk of steel and mill, drill, grind, saw, file, chisel away everything that's not a vise jaw? :D

Bob Fisher
11-03-2013, 11:16 AM
We have one of those where I work part time, and I must admit it has stood up to many assaults that are above and beyond the call of duty for a vise. The quality varies widely in Chinese stuff, but that's been kicked around enough here. Bob.

JoeLee
11-03-2013, 11:31 AM
Those vises were a cheap import they all cracked at the jaw line or slightly below. Years ago my uncle had an elcheapo tool store which sold mostly Buffalo brand tools, with me so far????? bench grinders that burn out as soon as you turn them on etc. etc. I remember seeing two pallets on the loading dock with heaps of those exact same vises piled up 3' high, they were all customer returns and probably destined for the scrap yard.
I thought it was a pretty cool idea to have a vise where the head swivels and thought it would be a great thing to have on the welding bench for positioning. I can't ever remember seeing an American made one like that!! I rummaged through the piles and found one that was only slightly cracked at the throat so I grabbed it. I pulled it back in place with a big clamp and welded it up. It's still working today but I'm always real careful about how much force I use when cranking on it.

JL..................

EddyCurr
11-03-2013, 01:37 PM
Might not hurt to inquire about P & A of replacement parts
for that vise?

I bought a large Gray Tools Mechanics Vise at auction cheap
because the action appeared to be broken. Aside from this,
a crooked handle and some weld splatter, the tool looked new.

A new Retaining Pin for the Nut and the action was functional
again.

But more pertinent to the post, Gray continues to offer a full line
of replacement parts for their vises at prices that make repair
worth considering.

.

kendall
11-03-2013, 05:00 PM
Get some heavy steel and weld up a replacement for the broken jaw?

bruto
11-03-2013, 06:38 PM
While I am sure it's possible to fix that Irwin, I have in my shop an enormous 6 inch Reed vise on a stand made of heavy pipe and the stump jumper from a huge bush hog, and also a Cole vise on a bench, both of which have worked well for decades, and on the wall of my barn I have a big old pipe vise set so I can put almost anything in and operate within the doorway. And of course a few smaller vises here and there, so anything the Irwin gets to do will require some imagination.

J Tiers
11-03-2013, 07:50 PM
I thought it was a pretty cool idea to have a vise where the head swivels and thought it would be a great thing to have on the welding bench for positioning. I can't ever remember seeing an American made one like that!!

They exist. Many of the utility trucks around here have a big one on the back step, and its US made, I forget what brand, I'll look next time I'm walking past one.

Almost all the chinese stuff of that type is a copy of some US or other device.

Dr Stan
11-03-2013, 08:08 PM
I have a similar one given to me 15-20 years ago by the owner of a welding shop. That one had broken where the round section joined the floating/moveable jaw. He was a very good welder, but even he couldn't weld it due to all the inclusions in the casting. I replaced the round part with some hot rolled of unknown variety and pinned it together. Put it on my welding bench as welding vises tend to be abused, at least by me. Didn't get the jaws as well aligned as I'd like, but at least I can beat on it and hold hot work without worrying about messing up my good US made $1000 vise.

As an aside I have an original "Parrot vice" made in Elyria, OH (I think, at least somewhere in OH) that my Mom bought my Dad for Christmas in the 1940's. She saw it advertised in the back of a men's magazine (no not that kind) and walked to downtown Elyria and bought this one and carried it back home. A walk of very many blocks without the benefit of a wheeled shopping basket. She eventually gave it to me several years after Dad died as she knew I wanted it. Its an interesting and very useful vise and I have yet to see another one in anyone's shop. I have seen copies for sale at Griz.