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Thomas Staubo
11-03-2013, 01:09 PM
New York, here I come! ;)

I'm travelling to New York city for almost two weeks in the period of late November - early December.
Do you guys have some tips on what to see or do?
Are there any museums, sights or fairs that's steam or machine related?


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EddyCurr
11-03-2013, 02:48 PM
Here are some suggestions LHC received back in September


Any places of interest related to machining/woodworking in New York City ? (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/60769-Any-places-of-interest-related-to-machining-woodworking-in-New-York-City?highlight=york+museums) (2013.09.21)

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Thomas Staubo
11-04-2013, 03:53 PM
Thanks! I guess I could have searched the forum first, but somehow didn't think of that. :)

I don't know if there's many New Yorkers here, but I was wondering about accommodation (haven't booked yet).
Any tips on where to stay that's fairly central in NYC but not too expensive?

It don't have to be a many-starred hotel, but I would prefer not to stay in a dump either.
What about "bed and breakfast"? Is that common over there?

EDIT: Found a B&B search site, but I'm not sure which areas are good to stay in. I'll search some more...



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Doozer
11-04-2013, 04:43 PM
Canal Street.
Where the machines used to come from.

-Doozer

Thomas Staubo
11-04-2013, 05:24 PM
I'm sorry, I didn't get that :confused:

Doozer
11-04-2013, 07:11 PM
I have read some Joe Michael's posts on PM when he grew up in NYC that all the machinery dealers
resided on Canal St. He told of it being a very bustling place, with all the machine moving going on
and machines out on the sidewallk. Garvin milling machines resided on canal street, as well as
Sid Jacobs, who started Manhattan Supply (MSC today). There might be some bits of history still
there to be seen.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/machine-dealers-store-front-photos-166893/

Cut and paste above, scroll down to Joe's post.

--Doozer

aostling
11-04-2013, 07:13 PM
Any tips on where to stay that's fairly central in NYC but not too expensive?


Thomas,

En route to Norway in August 2012 I stayed here, at 110 Avenue C in the East Village: http://www.bedandcoffee.com/ It is a seven block walk from the nearest subway station, and only cost me $125/night. It had all I need, including kitchen and wi-fi. The place is quiet, with its few rooms built inside a former brick bakery.

From there you can easily walk to Katz's Deli and see where Meg Ryan did that famous scene with Billy Crystal in When Harry Met Sally.

Be sure to walk the High Line http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Line_%28New_York_City%29, and get the world's best pizza (thin crust) sold by the slice.

EddyCurr
11-05-2013, 11:23 AM
I guess I could have searched the forum first No worries.

It is a coincidence that someone recently asked about sights in NYC.
The responses were fresh, comprehensive and in one place. Posting
the link was intended as a 'here ya go !' kind of reply, not the other
kind.

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gellfex
11-05-2013, 02:18 PM
I have read some Joe Michael's posts on PM when he grew up in NYC that all the machinery dealers
resided on Canal St. He told of it being a very bustling place, with all the machine moving going on
and machines out on the sidewallk. Garvin milling machines resided on canal street, as well as
Sid Jacobs, who started Manhattan Supply (MSC today). There might be some bits of history still
there to be seen.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/machine-dealers-store-front-photos-166893/

Cut and paste above, scroll down to Joe's post.

--Doozer

It's all gone. Back when I started my special effects career in the early 80's you could walk down Canal and pick up not just tools but surplus dc gearmotors, microswitches, relays, solenoids, random or custom cut metals and plastics, you name it. There were stores named "Industrial Plastics", "Canal Rubber" or "Canal Electric Motors". One time I needed a DPDT pushbutton momentary contact toggle switch, and found one for less than a buck in a heap of switches at Ramco Electronics, where I also bought my first PC, a "custom built" 286 with the add-on math co-processor. When I had my shop in TriBeCa I could walk to several tooling stores and several power transmission and bearing distributors. When I bought my 1st drill press at Rudolph Bass Tools, I wheeled it back to the shop on a hand truck.

Now there's a literally a Hilton on Canal Street. My grandfather the chandelier maker who first brought me to Canal as a teen is probably rolling in his grave.

My favorite story didn't take place on Canal, but nearby on Reade Street. Walking by I saw machine tools on the sidewalk, and asked the guy what was up, were they for sale? He said no, he was just moving his shop. "What do you make?" I asked. "Juggling equipment". He made custom stuff for jugglers and shipped it around the world. I walked away with a smile, happy that perhaps there will always be a place for those of us who actually make things.

Thomas Staubo
11-05-2013, 03:10 PM
Thanks everybody for the tips, and some interesting stories :).