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gbritnell
11-04-2013, 08:19 AM
Gentlemen,
It's been awhile since I posted anything so I'll update you on my current project. I won't post the whole build as it's on another forum but I will give you the highlights of the build so far.
For this winter's project I wanted to build another engine but this time in a configuration (cylinder count) that I don't have. I decided on an inline six based somewhat on my 4 cylinder engine. While drawing up the plans for it I decided to detail it more so than the 4 cylinder engine. This brought me to the venerable Ford 300 I six.
Working from just pictures I started creating the drawings. The engine will have a .750 bore and an .875 stroke. It will be water cooled, this time through the block and head. It will have a splash oil system as it has proven itself with the 4 cylinder engine.
Before cutting any metal I had to see if I could make the required helical gears to drive the distributor from the camshaft. Trying to make this engine more prototypical I would need the distributor mid block. A fellow on one of the other forums came up with a fixture and method to cut these gears. His name is Chuck Fellows. Along with Chuck another gentleman, produced a spread sheet to spit out the required numbers for P.D., tooth counts, etc.
gbritnell
http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/HELICAL%20GEAR%20CUTTING/HELIXF_zps061b8dc1.jpg.html
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/HELICAL%20GEAR%20CUTTING/HELIXH_zps30d0d7a9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/HELICAL%20GEAR%20CUTTING/HELIXH_zps30d0d7a9.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/HELICAL%20GEAR%20CUTTING/HELIXH_zps30d0d7a9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/HELICAL%20GEAR%20CUTTING/HELIXH_zps30d0d7a9.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/HELICAL%20GEAR%20CUTTING/HELIXA_zpsd3307b01.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/HELICAL%20GEAR%20CUTTING/HELIXA_zpsd3307b01.jpg.html)

duckman
11-04-2013, 08:29 AM
What is the other site I'd like to look at what you've done.

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 08:32 AM
Here's the link.
gbritnell
http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,2295.0.html

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 08:36 AM
Here's a video link to cutting the helical gears.
gbritnell
http://youtu.be/blaZ5tz0_6E

plastikosmd
11-04-2013, 09:10 AM
I demand proof that this is a metal shop and not some artistic rendition of one(not a chip seen!)
Great work, I thought I was just a wood butcher, add metal to that now

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 11:23 AM
ok, so here's the start of the engine machining. First up is the block. It's made from 6061 aluminum. It will have pressed in iron sleeves which will form the water jackets. It started from a block and was whittled away using angle plates and rotary table on the mill. For this engine I have come up with a much easier way to mount the crank. Rather than line boring, which is a royal pain in these smaller sizes, I have machined the bearing areas rectangular and will make the bronze inserts to fit. Naturally the center ones will be split to mount on the crank but the end bearings will be one piece, the rear also being cut for an -O- ring seal. The cam hole was put through when the block was solid thus providing support for the long tools. I have an Autocad drawing program that I use for my drawings and for making step-off charts for a lot of the radiused shapes and features.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9902_zps19f3a5d9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9902_zps19f3a5d9.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9901_zpsffabe6e3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9901_zpsffabe6e3.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9900_zps8229a6d3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9900_zps8229a6d3.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9896_zps93d08719.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_9896_zps93d08719.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 11:38 AM
The distributor side of the block took the most time. It has all the bosses for the oil filter, fuel pump, motor mounts, dipstick etc. With careful layout and machining all of the shapes were developed and finished. The distributor boss was left for last as it would take a special setup to put the hole in at the proper position and angle for the gears to mesh properly.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0121_zpsa0d1afe7.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0121_zpsa0d1afe7.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0130_zps34c83f44.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0130_zps34c83f44.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0136_zps11511432.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0136_zps11511432.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0127_zps5fd27bf3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0127_zps5fd27bf3.jpg.html)

Tilaran
11-04-2013, 12:03 PM
2.391 cu.in. ___if my 35 year old formulas in my hard head aren't corrupted.
.7854 x B x B x S x # of cylinders.
If your good it'll dyno 3 HP.:D

All these years I only THOUGHT I was an engine builder.

CarlByrns
11-04-2013, 12:06 PM
Looks nice- I had a 1996 F-150 with the 300 and a stick. Great engine.

A question: the prototype has a nearly square (slightly oversquare) 4.00 to 3.980 bore/stroke ratio. Why are you going for an undersquare .750 bore and .875 stroke?

mattthemuppet
11-04-2013, 04:19 PM
that is simply beautiful, what an amazing job! Can't wait to see it finished.

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 04:56 PM
The cylinder head is next. It's made from ductile iron or in this case Durabar. It's a very fine grained iron that cuts nice and leaves sharp edges. To try and emulate the full sized engine as much as possible the pushrods and spark plugs have to be on the same side of the head. The intake and exhaust are on the other. I did as much moving of ports and pushrod holes to fit the spark plugs in and ended up with 8-36 threads for the plugs. I have made plugs this small before so there shouldn't be a problem with them working.
Much similar to the block machining the majority of the work was done with an angle plate and rotary table. The combustion chambers were stepped out with a ball mill and then hand finished with mounted stones and riffler files.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/headg_zps5f5d24fd.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/headg_zps5f5d24fd.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/headf_zpsb41058b9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/headf_zpsb41058b9.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/headc_zpsba37b40b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/headc_zpsba37b40b.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/heada_zps9fd172e6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/heada_zps9fd172e6.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 05:09 PM
The crankshaft is made from 1144 stressproof steel. As the name implies this steel doesn't warp or warps minutely when cut so it makes a good material for crank machining. Here again following the full sized crankshaft I mimicked the counterweight shapes. I have no idea what the balance will be when finished but I can always machine them away later. Better to have them than to add them later. The journals, mains and rods are .312 diameter. The mains were rough turned on the lathe leaving about .007 to clean up after the throws were turned. After that the rod journals were milled to a square shape leaving about .03 for turning. A fixture had to be made to offset mount the crank in the lathe for turning. By milling most of the stock off it takes less time to turn, and it is also easier on the nerves.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/CRANKFIN3_zpsd7289d3c.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/CRANKFIN3_zpsd7289d3c.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/CRANKFIN1_zpsa4bb5bb6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/CRANKFIN1_zpsa4bb5bb6.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/CRANKFIN4_zps428cc591.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/CRANKFIN4_zps428cc591.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 05:15 PM
The oil pan and lower front cover flange are all machined as one. This part is also made from 6061 aluminum. The outside shape has draft on it so I started from the inside and roughed out the cavity. Once this was done I I made a fixture to locate the pan so the angular surfaces could be cut on the outside.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0337_zpsff2326c7.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0337_zpsff2326c7.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0334_zps0b010637.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0334_zps0b010637.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0331_zpsf44c67dc.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0331_zpsf44c67dc.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0319_zps13d8c51d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0319_zps13d8c51d.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 05:18 PM
Here's several pictures of the 3 major parts assembled.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0346_zps273bba36.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0346_zps273bba36.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0352_zps21bb6303.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0352_zps21bb6303.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0355_zps3ad0ae66.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0355_zps3ad0ae66.jpg.html)

vpt
11-04-2013, 05:30 PM
I always liked the 300I6. Thanks for sharing the build! I will quite enjoy this!

PStechPaul
11-04-2013, 05:43 PM
Very nice work! But I was surprised at the way the counterweights are sized and positioned. The original crankshaft looks a bit different:

http://images.craigslist.org/00Z0Z_2VC52KF76Ae_600x450.jpg

Here is an interesting article on the history of the Ford 6 cylinder engine:
http://www.classicinlines.com/history.asp

My first car was a 1960 Ford Falcon with a 144 cu engine and 2 speed automatic. In 1972 I bought a 1960 Econoline for $40 and it had a Fairlane 200 cu six, which ran very well after I did a little work on it. Around 1976 I bought a 1966 Econoline and after a few weeks the engine somehow went bad after a trip to a cabin on the Appalachian Trail, so I towed it back and replaced it with the engine from my older truck (which was badly rusted). The twice transplanted engine served me very well and was still running strong (and getting about 24 MPG) when I junked the newer truck around 1986.

gbritnell
11-04-2013, 06:23 PM
I'm sure over the years there were many changes made to the different components of the engine. Not having an actual engine to work from I had to go digging around on the net to find information. Here's a picture of what I found and am working from.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/ford3003_zpsdceaefdf.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/ford3003_zpsdceaefdf.jpg.html)

Guido
11-04-2013, 06:46 PM
PStechPaul----Happy you've posted the classicinlines.com page. They've explained simply why an inline engine will develop torque, when a V configuration utilizing the same displacement will develop quite a different torque vs rpm curve. 'Longer time for piston to push' scenario.

For same reason, the cranks in typical F-1 engines (V8), have 'flat cranks', or '90 degree' cranks'. ie, all the throws are in one plane; like having twin four cylinder motors turning the same crank. Big torque, big HP, and a unique/crazy exhaust sound to boot.

--G

farrviewsouth
11-04-2013, 06:50 PM
Absolutely impressive , thanks for posting!

boslab
11-04-2013, 08:01 PM
My ol man aka dad used to say, "you dont know enough to know how little you do know", probably not original but i think i just found out!
Amazing work, ive been to the model engineer exhibition in London many times, this should definately be there. I think i need to improve my gearcutting a bit!
The oil pan was beautiful.
Great work
Mark

sasquatch
11-04-2013, 09:10 PM
Great workmanship as usual Geo, These postings are very much appreciated.

PStechPaul
11-04-2013, 11:45 PM
It will be exciting to see it running. I found some videos of other small model engines:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyhQvbd60rE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0HJjvyLj9E

And also some interesting electric solenoid piston engines:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhYEdD94vH0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddG_TAXgjXs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29KAiUYL3DY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwgVFMYbF70

And there are some fascinating live steam engines:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RfTDW1m4Gw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEdaOSVq3D4

http://www.greensteamengine.com/ (a rather unique design)

Also the Stirling engine is fascinating:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVq8JC_PIAA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKLH3lPn1q8

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:02 AM
I started out by showing the making of the cam gears. The cam would have to be made in 2 pieces to insert the gear in the middle. The shafts are made from W-1 drill rod and left unhardened. The lifters will be hardened and polished. I've had good results with this combination over the years. At the end of both pieces I milled a flat so that they would be keyed to each other in the proper angular orientation. I draw up the profile and lobe spacing that I want then make a step-off chart so that the cam can be milled using a H/V rotary table with a tailstock for support on the outboard end. The process is to start at zero both radially and in Z and cut the lobe shape in small facets. Once the first lobe is finished the RT is turned to the center line of the second lobe (95 degrees) and the process is started again. This is done for each subsequent lobe at it's related angle to the number 1 lobe.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0797_zps3352aa57.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0797_zps3352aa57.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0799_zps968d1c14.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0799_zps968d1c14.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:05 AM
Here's a several pictures showing the flats and how they locate the gear.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0810_zps105ccccc.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0810_zps105ccccc.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0823_zps44746d96.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0823_zps44746d96.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0813_zpsc8f23409.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0813_zpsc8f23409.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:18 AM
With both pieces finish machined the flats were lightly filed until they were a nice snug fit inside the gear. Everything was cleaned up and then Loctited in place. Before the Loctite set up I mounted the cam in a fixture to hold it true. The lobes were then filed with a small fine pillar file and then polished with various grades of emery and crocus paper.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0897_zps687534e3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0897_zps687534e3.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0900_zps824f7029.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0900_zps824f7029.jpg.html)

Doozer
11-05-2013, 08:23 AM
PStechPaul----Happy you've posted the classicinlines.com page. They've explained simply why an inline engine will develop torque, when a V configuration utilizing the same displacement will develop quite a different torque vs rpm curve. 'Longer time for piston to push' scenario.

For same reason, the cranks in typical F-1 engines (V8), have 'flat cranks', or '90 degree' cranks'. ie, all the throws are in one plane; like having twin four cylinder motors turning the same crank. Big torque, big HP, and a unique/crazy exhaust sound to boot.

--G


From the web site link...
"The inline six by design will produce more torque pound for pound than a V8. The reason is simple; a V8 spins the crankshaft 90 degrees for each stroke, while the inline six turns the crank 120 degrees between strokes. This means for every revolution, the inline design inherently has more time to deliver power to the crankshaft."

This is crap. Totally wrong.
--Doozer

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:35 AM
The bellhousing was next. This was also made from 6061 aluminum. A block was squared up and the mounting holes and inside were cut first. As with most parts it's always easier to cut the inside and then clamp or mount the piece to a fixture to cut the outside.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0743_zps0f66adef.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0743_zps0f66adef.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0740_zpsad760d38.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0740_zpsad760d38.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0746_zps40324d6d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0746_zps40324d6d.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:41 AM
This piece required quite a few different setups for milling. To rough down the stock I mounted the piece to my angle plate and clamped that into my mill vise at the proper angle.
One this was done a fixture plate was made up to do all the rotary table work. I started with a .25 ball mill to do all the roughing passes. I initially laid out the part so I would have a visual reference for the external shapes, ribs, bosses etc.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0752_zpsd284eb35.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0752_zpsd284eb35.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0755_zpsa86c5911.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0755_zpsa86c5911.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0757_zps5285da6f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0757_zps5285da6f.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:45 AM
After most of the roughing was done I went back in with the finish ball mill and started all the final passes. In the case of the 2 ribs on the top of the housing I had to just bump to a line because as the steps went down the rotational position of the ribs changed. I also had to watch all the tangent points so that I didn't overcut any of the features.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0766_zpscfc3df0c.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0766_zpscfc3df0c.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0769_zpsd0ec09e5.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0769_zpsd0ec09e5.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0773_zps8baea749.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0773_zps8baea749.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0777_zps3af89738.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0777_zps3af89738.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:51 AM
After the milling was complete I started in with miniature burrs, small mounted stones, files and emery paper. I ended up with one small overcut that I drilled and plugged to finish up the surface.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0781_zps19239bdd.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0781_zps19239bdd.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH1_zpsbea9bdfb.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH1_zpsbea9bdfb.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH2_zps47325d84.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH2_zps47325d84.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH3_zpseb7b45f8.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH3_zpseb7b45f8.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:52 AM
This picture will give you a size relationship. That is a quarter sitting in front of the bellhousing.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH4_zpsfd8c8184.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/BELLFINISH4_zpsfd8c8184.jpg.html)

George Seal
11-05-2013, 10:24 AM
Guys
If I am not mistaken, George does not have CNC equipment. This is all done on manual equipment


That much more impressive

JCHannum
11-05-2013, 11:04 AM
George's work is always awesome and this does not dissappoint. He is a true craftsman and artist.

Those interested in his shop will find this video interesting. He does not use CNC, all tools are manual and include the dreaded import round column mill-drill and a 6" Atlas Craftsman lathe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7_O2jPpmEg

For your further enjoyment, here are George's videos including among other things, the Ford 302 V-8 that is in a previous post as well as the T-5 transmisssion and 9" differential and rear end that accompany it.

http://www.youtube.com/user/gbritnell/videos

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 12:21 PM
Thank you George, JC and all others for the gracious comments. I enjoy sharing my work with like minded people.
JC, actually I moved up from the old round column Enco mill about 1-1/2 years ago. I had done enough work to pay for a knee mill finally although after using the old round column for so long I didn't even think about it's shortcomings. For the money I paid for this one I probably could have found a decent BP or BP clone but the one requirement was that it had to go in the basement shop so after a great deal of searching I settled on this Grizzly. Quite a nice machine actually.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/GRIZZLY%20MILL/2f1c2df7-9fb1-49fa-80d8-0c9bb8c7494f_zps540043e8.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/GRIZZLY%20MILL/2f1c2df7-9fb1-49fa-80d8-0c9bb8c7494f_zps540043e8.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/GRIZZLY%20MILL/2834d17a-692f-473f-b185-0fa2987fc498_zpsf3ddd938.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/GRIZZLY%20MILL/2834d17a-692f-473f-b185-0fa2987fc498_zpsf3ddd938.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/GRIZZLY%20MILL/IMG_3963.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/GRIZZLY%20MILL/IMG_3963.jpg.html)

Doozer
11-05-2013, 01:20 PM
http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i169/kooldoozer/Machines%20and%20Stuff/IMG_0110.jpg (http://s72.photobucket.com/user/kooldoozer/media/Machines%20and%20Stuff/IMG_0110.jpg.html)

I have seen that mill for sale at Grizzly.
I always thought they coppied the Clausing 8520 with the Bridgeport head.
(a Clausingport if you will)
See the similarity?

--Doozer

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 07:52 PM
The exhaust manifold presented a number of problems. I could have simplified it or made it from tubing but here again I wanted it to represent the full sized version. To accomplish this I would have to do some fabricating and silver soldering. I decided to make it from 1144 steel knowing that 1018 would probably warp terribly when silver soldered.
The main runner was machined with the porting drilled from the head face first. The part was then turned with the bottom up and the matching ports were drilled to intersect the ones coming in from the head face. I then took a ball mill and cut a channel in the bottom of the runner from end port to end port. I then made a patch piece to go into the slot. It was cut with the same ball mill leaving a radius at the ends so when the outside shape was finished it wouldn't break through.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0616_zps0b9c0d79.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0616_zps0b9c0d79.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0619_zpsefd7005f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0619_zpsefd7005f.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0624_zps06341c63.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0624_zps06341c63.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0625_zps3fb9a876.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0625_zps3fb9a876.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 07:55 PM
After cutting the channel in the patch piece I flipped it over in the vise and thinned it down to fit in the slot, -.004 for the silver solder to run into. I also left small tabs along the edge to keep it as true as possible when soldering.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0628_zps83bf1941.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0628_zps83bf1941.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0631_zps0b86b295.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0631_zps0b86b295.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0634_zps881ef54b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0634_zps881ef54b.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0637_zps43565763.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0637_zps43565763.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 07:58 PM
The collector box and outlet flange would have to be made in 2 pieces and soldered together before soldering to the main runner. I used 45% silver solder on them and 54% when assembling the whole thing.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0642_zpsd9aa7e0b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0642_zpsd9aa7e0b.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0646_zpsa09201c4.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0646_zpsa09201c4.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0651_zps1d2f3673.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0651_zps1d2f3673.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:01 PM
A few more shot of the collector box in place prior to soldering.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0652_zps93a37de1.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0652_zps93a37de1.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0655_zps7aa7719c.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0655_zps7aa7719c.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0658_zps0d5382f6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0658_zps0d5382f6.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:05 PM
This early manifold also had the heat riser boss for the carb choke. This will machined and fit to the space left between the ribs on the face of the runner.
Everything was meticulously cleaned, fluxed and then the soldering (brazing for those who don't like to call it soldering) began.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0663_zps3c5f6860.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0663_zps3c5f6860.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0666_zps52a36347.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0666_zps52a36347.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0667_zps9be5712f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0667_zps9be5712f.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0670_zpsf5985eed.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0670_zpsf5985eed.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:08 PM
I let everything cool on it's own so as to not induce any warping to it. Once cooled I gave it a quick boiling to remove the flux and then cleaned it up in the sand blaster.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0679_zps620f2a9e.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0679_zps620f2a9e.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0682_zps83b3b3e9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0682_zps83b3b3e9.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0685_zps43a0fbdb.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0685_zps43a0fbdb.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0690_zps73136a95.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0690_zps73136a95.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:22 PM
After many hours of burring, stoning, filing and polishing I finally got the manifold finished.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0721_zps49a0f237.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0721_zps49a0f237.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0716_zps1bb17909.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0716_zps1bb17909.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0714_zpse45ff07b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0714_zpse45ff07b.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0724_zpsb69dda7e.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0724_zpsb69dda7e.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:23 PM
Here's a shot to show the comparative size to a quarter.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0736_zpsbe629cb9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0736_zpsbe629cb9.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-05-2013, 08:28 PM
Today's final posting is some shots of all the major external components bolted together. Later in the week I'll be starting on the rods, pistons and other internal parts.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0873_zps4c4bd001.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0873_zps4c4bd001.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0879_zps5f770198.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0879_zps5f770198.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0885_zps351c07ed.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0885_zps351c07ed.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0888_zps2fbb4a98.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0888_zps2fbb4a98.jpg.html)

darryl
11-05-2013, 08:46 PM
George, that is some amazing and outstanding craftsmanship! I am humbled every time I see one of your creations. Thanks for posting.

sasquatch
11-05-2013, 08:49 PM
Agreed, and beautiful brazing!!

gbritnell
11-09-2013, 11:13 AM
The next part of the project is the connecting rods. Everyone has their favorite material and way of making rods, here's mine and the reasoning behind it. I guess when I first started building hit an miss engines from castings they came with cast bronze rods so when I started building some of my multi-cylinder engines I just followed suit. The one main difference being that my rods are made from a hard bearing bronze rather than the softer composition of the cast rods. I so dislike making spit bearings, especially in very small sizes so by making the rods from bronze I eliminate that part of the build. I also have to note that I have had very good performance with these rods both in my splash oil engines and pressure fed. Don't forget were talking model engines here, not something that has to be driven cross country. My small 4 cylinder engine spins quite fast and over it's lifetime I have only had to refit the rods a couple of time. This just involves removing the caps and taking usually no more than .002 from the rods and putting it back together. I know what you're saying, "the rest of the bore is egg shaped." Well not really! I have found that most of the wear is in the thrust direction, up and down, so although there is wear left and right I have found it to be minimal.
I start with a piece of stock cut to the overall dimensions of the rod. I drill and tap from the bottom end for the required screw and then cut the cap off with a slitting saw. Prior to cutting I put a small dimple on the matching side so that the cap can be reinstalled in the correct orientation. The rod blanks being rectangular make it easy for all the preliminary machining steps. I then set up a stop in the vise for repetitive parts and drill, ream and bore the rods. Once this is done I make up a fixture plate with the necessary bushing to locate the rods and then cut the ribs and profiles.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0909_zps7c035a89.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0909_zps7c035a89.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0910_zps451ed82d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0910_zps451ed82d.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0904_zpsf1871db5.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0904_zpsf1871db5.jpg.html)

sasquatch
11-09-2013, 05:11 PM
Very nice, those are STRONG looking rods! (Reminds me of race engine connecting rods.)

flutedchamber
11-09-2013, 08:26 PM
Nothing short of just amazing. I am in awe at what you have accomplished.

Paul Alciatore
11-10-2013, 01:33 AM
That is fan-tas-tic work. Absolutely beautiful!

Paul Alciatore
11-10-2013, 01:43 AM
Not meaning to hijack the thread, but I can see why that argument is no good. I mean, a given cylinder will continue to add torque to the crankshaft until something stops that process. The absolute limit would be when it reaches dead center bottom. But at some point before that the exhaust valve may start to open. Or the hot gases may be fully expanded. Or whatever.

So, does an inline six produce more torque than a V8, pound for pound? And why? Does it just use less metal for a given displacement?




From the web site link...
"The inline six by design will produce more torque pound for pound than a V8. The reason is simple; a V8 spins the crankshaft 90 degrees for each stroke, while the inline six turns the crank 120 degrees between strokes. This means for every revolution, the inline design inherently has more time to deliver power to the crankshaft."

This is crap. Totally wrong.
--Doozer

Mtw fdu
11-10-2013, 01:44 AM
Where can you get measurements of the block at a scale 1:1. Then to make a smaller one from those?

Mtw fdu.

EddyCurr
11-10-2013, 08:33 AM
In his other projects (a differential, a T-5 transmission and the 302 V-8),
Mr Britnell wrote about creating dimensional drawings in AutoCad based
on physical measurements he made of components from actual diff,
transmission and engine assemblies.

Pretty comprehensive threads describing the builds for those projects can
be located on this forum.

Edit: I see Mr Britnell writes at the beginning of this thread that he began
making drawings based just on pictures. A little ways into the thread he
posts an 'exploded' illustration of major components (post #17.)

CarlByrns
11-10-2013, 08:56 AM
So, does an inline six produce more torque than a V8, pound for pound? And why? Does it just use less metal for a given displacement?

In general, inline sixes produce pretty much the same amount of torque per cubic inch than a V8 of similar displacement. Depending on who you believe, my 1996 F-150's 300 (4.9 liter) six made 292 lb-ft of torque , while the optional 302 (5.0) V8 made 270 lb-ft. The difference is the torque curve- the six's torque comes on much earlier, so in driving it feels more powerful. Americans talk horsepower, but we drive torque.

Inline engines are heavy- the Ford 300 weighed more than the 302 or 351 by around 50 pounds.

The Ford 300 is a very durable engine- it was used as OEM power on all sorts of turf and ag equipment, including tub grinders, gensets, and tractors where it was expected to run at full output for hours at a time.

The 300 went out of production because it was heavy and it couldn't meet emissions or fuel economy standards.

CarlByrns
11-10-2013, 09:01 AM
I see Mr Britnell writes at the beginning of this thread that he began
making drawings based just on pictures. A little ways into the thread he
posts an 'exploded' illustration of major components (post #17.)

I wish Mr. Britnell would answer my question: the prototype has a nearly square (slightly oversquare) 4.00 to 3.980 bore/stroke ratio. Why change to an undersquare .750 bore and .875 stroke?

gbritnell
11-10-2013, 10:08 AM
Hi Mr. Byrns,
I wasn't trying to avoid answering your question. When I started on this project I used the basic dimensions from an inline 4 cylinder engine that I had built, that way most of the internal components would be the same. Scaling down the actual bore and stroke wasn't a priority or necessity as I was working from line drawings to build the engine anyway. My goal is to build a running and reasonable copy of a 300 six. Other liberties have to be taken when building miniatures just to make them run so hopefully when it's finished it will run good and look something like the full sized engine.
gbritnell
P.S. Here's a link to the 4 cylinder engine running.
http://youtu.be/lfTGrYdp_BI

vincemulhollon
11-10-2013, 10:19 AM
For this winter's project ...

How do you make stuff so fast? Yes very nice work, basically perfect or at least close enough not to matter, and theres my question, I bet I could make something look as nice as your projects, but it would take me an entire lifetime (or more) at the same quality level. For example I think I could make an exhaust manifold that looks just as good as yours, its just you apparently did it in a couple days, whereas I'd estimate it would take me several weeks but less than a season.

So I'm guessing:

1) Amazing blueprints?

2) Is your shop organization technique amazing like you organize an assembly line to make con rods on an assembly line not onesie twosie? That would help, I suppose. Or is it shop organization like you're optimized the location of machines, raw materials, tools, and parts such that everythings in reach and nothings in the way?

3) Immense material / tool stockpile so you never have to order anything and wait a couple days (I personally always seem to be unable to accomplish anything without ordering one more part or one more tool or I can't believe I ran out of inserts last time and didn't order more...)

4) Energy drinks / insomnia / working so fast its aerobic exercise?

5) If you're trolling us and spent the entire decade of the 1990s building this thing but are releasing the pics all at once now, I'd LOL.

6) There are more hours in the day in Ohio?

7) Perhaps you've got some interesting jigs and fixtures and setup tools that are not getting into the pictures? Like you've got some magic gadget to tram mills in 5 seconds better than I can do in 5 minutes, times a hundred other gadgets, and it all adds up?

8) (Edited to add option 8 is probably its something I haven't thought of?)

There's gotta be some "trick" to home shop productivity, says the guy who somehow managed to burn an entire day making and installing four very custom shaped brass brackets for a simple carpentry box project. I believe I spent a day making those brackets around the same day you somehow built an entire engine block that would take me about a month?

How to make a professional shop produce quickly is pretty well trodden ground, lots to read. But there's probably a magazine article for someone to explain how to make a home shop produce quickly. I enjoy wasting time and find it highly relaxing and perhaps the most fun I have all week (well, depends on the week, and how well things go in the shop...), but if I needed to be in a hurry to fix something, maybe for the innards of my car, it would be interesting to know how to do it quick.

CarlByrns
11-10-2013, 11:54 AM
When I started on this project I used the basic dimensions from an inline 4 cylinder engine that I had built, that way most of the internal components would be the same.
gbritnell
P.S. Here's a link to the 4 cylinder engine running.
http://youtu.be/lfTGrYdp_BI

Well, that makes sense. Love the video.

J Tiers
11-10-2013, 12:58 PM
Do threads like this one make any of the rest of you think about taking up a different hobby? They sure do me..... I just am amazed.

Somewhere in all that I would suppose I'd likely turn a crank the wrong way, and mess up some part that I had 40 hours in.... I believe that would annoy me a tad..............

And that's assuming I got that far to begin with, which by itself is pretty doubtful.

EddyCurr
11-10-2013, 01:44 PM
I doubt that someone attains the level Mr Britnell, Mr Rupnow, Mr Wilson,
Mr Williams, jhe.1973, yourself and others on this board have achieved
without turning the handle wrong once or more times.

It is what we do afterwards that defines us.

Always in the back of my mind as I watch these and other projects unfold.

On with the build !

.

The Artful Bodger
11-10-2013, 02:14 PM
I still drive a 1999 Australian Ford with their development of the I-6, I love the smooth idle and power when I ask for it. They still make the engine up to 360HP, 390ft/lb right out of the showroom.

gbritnell
11-10-2013, 05:01 PM
Hi Vince,
To answer a few of your questions.
1. At one time I built engines, steam and gas from someone else's drawings and castings, now I design my own engines and make my own drawings in Autocad. This in itself takes many, many hours.
2. I'm 68 years old and have been machining since my early 20's. I worked for the Ford Motor Co. as a metal patternmaker, pattern designer and for the last 9 years at Ford did CAD modeling and cutterpathing for the CNC machines. When you do something for this long you learn to 'think ahead' so I don't spend a lot of time figuring out how to do something.
I was taught my trade by what I consider the last of the great metal craftsmen in a manufacturing environment. For this I am truly grateful.
3. As far as allocated time, I am now retired and spend as much time as I can with my machines. I don't golf, bowl or watch a great deal of TV, I machine things, this is what I enjoy.
4. I don't have a large stockpile of material. Usually when I start a project I figure what material I will need and order it ahead of time. Like I said the designing take enough time for the material to arrive.
5. Jigs and fixtures. Almost every complex job I do requires the aforementioned tooling. It's just part of machining. To date I have a box about 18 x 16 x 12 inches full of aluminum plates with a myriad of holes drilled, bored and tapped for holding parts to be machined. Usually I can recycle these fixture plates for more than one job and sometimes more.
6. And finally it's not important to produce parts quickly. I don't do this for a living any longer. I learned a long time ago not to put a deadline on making something, it takes the enjoyment out of it. Do the best you can and it will get done when it gets done.
Please don't take any of my answers as anything more than that. I only meant to answer some of what you asked.
gbritnell

5.

PStechPaul
11-10-2013, 05:56 PM
Awesome and impressive work!

I was wondering if you only keep and run these engines as stand-alone models, or have you ever connected them to a drive train and perhaps a small vehicle or even a power tool such as a chainsaw or mower? It might also be an interesting challenge to make a small generator. Thanks for sharing your skill and knowledge.

darryl
11-10-2013, 06:26 PM
It's been a while since I've thought this way, but there was a time when I thought it would be cool to build a scaled down engine to use in a scaled down vehicle of sorts. Possibly a bicycle with a V-8 on it- I've seen that on a motorcycle, but in full size. I don't know how that guy ever kept the thing upright-

As far as weight and power goes, at half size you'd be into 1/8 the weight, which puts it somewhat into a zone of reality. I don't know if power scales roughly like that as well, but it seems reasonable.

I do also think that it would be tough to build something in fractional scale for a real use in something, and have it come within a reasonable, or comparable cost. As George has said, and others would concur, it's fun to just be doing it- never mind the time involved.

Maybe we could brainstorm a little on what some reasonable or practical uses there might be for some of these little engines. That could give somebody enough insight to spur them into building one of their own.

gbritnell
11-10-2013, 06:46 PM
Darryl,
My intent with my 302, T-5 transmission and 9" Ford differential is to build a chassis with steering, suspension etc. I have a frame drawn for a '32' Ford hot rod but haven't quite figured out how to fabricate it yet. I'll keep you informed.
gbritnell

darryl
11-10-2013, 08:27 PM
George, I'm sure that will be as interesting as the rest of the stuff you've come up with.

Willy
11-10-2013, 11:23 PM
First of all George, thank you once again for taking the time to document and describe yet an other incredible project. Just when I think you've out done yourself on the last project you surprise us with an even more stunning example of your skill.

I remember a while back when you stated that you had acquired a new mill, looks like you haven't let any dust settle on it yet.LOL
I'm sure the new mill has made some of you work a little easier, although you did do some very nice work with your old mill/drill!



Not meaning to hijack the thread, but I can see why that argument is no good. I mean, a given cylinder will continue to add torque to the crankshaft until something stops that process. The absolute limit would be when it reaches dead center bottom. But at some point before that the exhaust valve may start to open. Or the hot gases may be fully expanded. Or whatever.

So, does an inline six produce more torque than a V8, pound for pound?

Paul, Doozer is spot on in his remark about that website's analogy of why a 6 cyl. engine produces more torque. I can only use the terms total BS and fantasy to describe what that article states.


From the web site link...
"The inline six by design will produce more torque pound for pound than a V8. The reason is simple; a V8 spins the crankshaft 90 degrees for each stroke, while the inline six turns the crank 120 degrees between strokes. This means for every revolution, the inline design inherently has more time to deliver power to the crankshaft."


The frequency of power impulses has absolutely no bearing on the production of torque.
All things being equal, for a given displacement a six cylinder engine will have bigger pistons and a longer stroke than an 8 cyl. engine. Torque is a product of force applied to a lever arm. The longer the lever arm, the greater the amount of torque produced for a give amount force applied.
There are of course a multitude of other factors that also have a bearing on certain engine designs and the type of power characteristics that will be produced. Consider this is a very basic description.

gbritnell
11-19-2013, 06:57 PM
I've made some good progress on the engine. I made and fitted all the main bearings. They did require a little massaging to get the crank spinning nice and smoothly but when you're working with such small dimensions over the length of this block something as small as .001 from journal to journal will snug things up quite a bit.
Next up were the timing gears. These are 48 D.P. and were cut with one of my home-made hobs. I had made fly cutting bits in the past but this required a separate tool for different diameters where with the hob it will generate somewhat of an involute curve in the larger tooth counts.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0931_zps5eb50d28.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0931_zps5eb50d28.jpg.html)

gbritnell
11-19-2013, 07:00 PM
The last part of this update is the rocker arms. Boy for something so small I sure have a lot of time wrapped up in them. I'm guessing about 16 hours. At first I was going to use round stock and drill and ream the .187 hole then the slugs could be mounted in my dividing head for all the other cuts but after some contemplation it would have been very wasteful to do it that way so I stared with rectangular stock. I cleaned up the stock leaving .02 per side then chucked them in my 4 jaw on the lathe to put the .187 dia. pivot hole in. I made 4 blanks so that I could get 3 rockers per blank. That way they wouldn't stick out of the dividing head too far.
In the dividing head I cut all the outside profiles and then removed them and sawed them from the chucking lug with a slitting saw. This way I wouldn't have to try and hold the small pieces to cut them to width.
The next operations were putting the center slots and roller slots in. For this I made pockets in an aluminum fixture plate to hold them.
The final operations were radiusing the noses and bottoms then polishing.
I think this is the most tedious work when making multi-cylinder engines.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0919_zpsfbd4186a.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0919_zpsfbd4186a.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0920_zps693f33bd.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0920_zps693f33bd.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0923_zpsed58a855.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0923_zpsed58a855.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0928_zps50daaae0.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0928_zps50daaae0.jpg.html)

toolznthings
11-19-2013, 08:58 PM
Fantastic craftsmanship !! I wish you were my neighbor !!:)

gbritnell
12-01-2013, 12:28 PM
Here's the latest update on the engine. I have finished the top end, head valves, rocker arms etc. In the past I have used different methods for retaining the valve springs and caps to the valve stems. With very small stems I have threaded the top of the stem and then screwed the cap down until it bound up and locked itself. I did this with my 4 cylinder OHV engine and have never had any problems. Another way was to cross drill the stem and use a keeper pin set into a recess in the cap. This is good for larger valve stems, say .093 and larger. On my radial I made wire rings that were locked in place by a taper cut into the cap. For this engine I took a page from Steve Huck's build and used tiny E clips. My valve stems are .078 diameter and I was able to get metric sized clips that seem to work well. Time will tell.
When I mounted all the rocker arms to the pedestals I realized that some of them were very close to the bosses on the inside of the rocker cover so to remedy the situation I used one of the fixtures I had made when I first machined the rocker arms and cut a taper on the pushrod side of the rockers. Actually I like the looks better with the taper.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0946_zpsf4354b4c.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0946_zpsf4354b4c.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0949_zps304263d9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0949_zps304263d9.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0952_zpsd9bb0981.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0952_zpsd9bb0981.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0958_zps44f32fd4.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_0958_zps44f32fd4.jpg.html)

sasquatch
12-01-2013, 05:14 PM
Love it Geo, just awesome, thanks for the most interesting update on this build.

gbritnell
12-09-2013, 07:57 PM
I have just completed the distributor. It has a Hall transistor triggered by a timing disc with one magnet inside. The cap and rotor are made from Delrin with brass contacts. The outside diameter of the cap and distributor body is 1.05 inches. The helical gear is one of the gears I cut in another thread.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1024_zps77fb5e23.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1024_zps77fb5e23.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1030_zpsf9604c36.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1030_zpsf9604c36.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1042_zpsa00cd3e3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1042_zpsa00cd3e3.jpg.html)http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1072_zpsd2fcc84f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1072_zpsd2fcc84f.jpg.html)

gbritnell
12-09-2013, 08:00 PM
Here are a couple of video links, one to the distributor firing a plug and the other showing the engine components on the workbench.
gbritnell
http://youtu.be/v3HNroyfWWM
http://youtu.be/0AaXhMzmCQk

sasquatch
12-09-2013, 08:38 PM
Great videos Geo., thanks for the very enjoyable posting.

PStechPaul
12-09-2013, 08:43 PM
Very nice! Did you also make the spark plugs? Seeing that engine come to life brings back memories of my Ford 200 cu engines. They had mechanical breakers in the distributor but I had a retrofit transistorized ignition that reduced wear on the points. I don't know if electronic ignition was available - maybe sometime after 1966 which was my latest model. That basic engine had a long history. I liked it.

Willy
12-09-2013, 10:39 PM
Once again George thank you for keeping us updated on this project. You know it is sometimes hard for me to stay focused on the fact that this is a scale engine.
The details you have included almost leads one away from the fact that this is indeed a miniature 300 cu.in. Ford.
Having owned one of these in a 1970 Ford 3/4 ton for many years I am quite familiar with the engine and did not truly appreciate the size of your project until the sense of scale was driven home by having watched the two videos that you included.
The inclusion of your hand in the videos really put this point into perspective!

Mtw fdu
12-10-2013, 04:56 AM
Wow, wow, and more wow!!!

Mtw fdu.

gbritnell
12-14-2013, 12:08 PM
Gentlmen,
Here's the latest update on the engine build. This installment is the water pump. The body is made from 6061 aluminum. The shaft is 303 stainless and the impeller is bronze. I machined the pump body to accept small ball bearings if the bronze plain bearing doesn't hold up. Below the bearing is a cavity for a small 'O' ring (.125 x .250) With such tiny parts it's hard to take pictures while it's being machined.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1148_zpscae9e2c1.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1148_zpscae9e2c1.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1151_zps1823d7da.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1151_zps1823d7da.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1154_zpsa4ca9922.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1154_zpsa4ca9922.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1155_zpsac92ad1d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1155_zpsac92ad1d.jpg.html)

gbritnell
12-14-2013, 12:12 PM
Here's a few more pictures of the pump with a penny for comparison.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1158_zpsb6bbb5d9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1158_zpsb6bbb5d9.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1169_zpsfdc763a2.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1169_zpsfdc763a2.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1175_zpseae61e46.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1175_zpseae61e46.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1176_zps094214ac.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1176_zps094214ac.jpg.html)

sasquatch
12-14-2013, 05:36 PM
Thanks much for the great update again Geo, impressive stuff, can't wait to see a video of it running.

isaaccarlson
12-15-2013, 12:54 AM
I am eager to hear it.

Peter.
12-15-2013, 04:44 AM
Always a humbling experience watching your projects unfold George. Thanks for updating the build.

vpt
12-15-2013, 08:43 AM
Awesome! An amazing amount of small work into these small motors!

Black Forest
12-15-2013, 10:30 AM
Gbritnell you seem to be getting the hang of this machining thing. Keep at it and someday you will be good at it!;)

Awesome work and a real inspiration to see your work.

gbritnell
12-15-2013, 10:54 AM
Gentlemen,
Thank you all for the very nice responses. Black Forest, I keep trying!!! LOL
gbritnell

PStechPaul
12-15-2013, 06:30 PM
I am curious if these engines sound anything like their big brothers, or do they have a higher pitched sound? I don't recall if any of your YouTube videos have sound. I'll have to check them. Awesome work!

gbritnell
12-15-2013, 11:10 PM
Hi Paul,
Here's a link to a video of my V-8. Although it doesn't sound like a full sized engine it still isn't high pitched.
gbritnell
http://youtu.be/fRVYYtdhG_8

Doozer
12-15-2013, 11:16 PM
Dude, you do nice work.
But for all your effort, you could
build an engine half scale.
Then you could put it on a motorcycle
or something. Then you could actually
drive it round. Just thinking maximum
fun for the buck, so to speak.
Looks good though.
Next how about a 5.9 Cummins?
Can EDM make injectors that small???

--Doozer

gbritnell
12-18-2013, 07:57 AM
Gentlemen,
Here's the latest update to the engine build. I have finished a lot of the small bolt on pieces, water outlet, oil filter, fuel pump and breather cap. The flywheel was also completed. Although the fuel pump and oil filter are non-functional they are there for the overall look of the engine.
First pictures are of the breather cap and water outlet.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1197_zpsf2d831e8.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1197_zpsf2d831e8.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1185_zps2784c185.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1185_zps2784c185.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1182_zpsfac8d728.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1182_zpsfac8d728.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1206_zps35a39fd3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1206_zps35a39fd3.jpg.html)

gbritnell
12-18-2013, 07:59 AM
Well it looks like Photbucket isn't cooperating. The pictures are in my library but the links aren't opening so I'll have to sort it out before I post any more information.
gbritnell

gbritnell
12-18-2013, 05:03 PM
Ok, it looks like things have straightened out at Photobucket so here's the update.
The first two parts are the breather cap and the water outlet. Both are made from 6061 aluminum. The breather has a 1/4-32 stainless bushing threaded into the cap which then screws into the rocker cover.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1197_zpsf2d831e8.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1197_zpsf2d831e8.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1185_zps2784c185.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1185_zps2784c185.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1182_zpsfac8d728.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1182_zpsfac8d728.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1206_zps35a39fd3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1206_zps35a39fd3.jpg.html)

gbritnell
12-18-2013, 05:06 PM
The next part is the flywheel. This is made from 12L14 mild steel. The flywheel will be keyed (.062) and set screwed to the crankshaft. I cut the teeth around the perimeter of the flywheel somewhat to replicate the full sized flywheel and who knows in the future it could be geared to something. The D.P. is 32 and the tooth count is 88. The enlarged area is for a one-way bearing clutch.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1204_zps06202d1d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1204_zps06202d1d.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1194_zpsbf199281.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1194_zpsbf199281.jpg.html)

gbritnell
12-18-2013, 05:11 PM
The last 2 parts are the fuel pump and oil filter canister. These are non-functional but are there to add to the overall look of the actual engine.
gbritnell

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1191_zps4a552532.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1191_zps4a552532.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1188_zps10fad56a.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1188_zps10fad56a.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1200_zps5ea3ab6a.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1200_zps5ea3ab6a.jpg.html)

The last picture is just an overall shot with all the bits mounted to the engine.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1179_zps14f1b018.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1179_zps14f1b018.jpg.html)

Dragons_fire
12-18-2013, 05:59 PM
Great engine. You make me jealous, I wish i had those skills!

One question, is the breather cap really 1/14-32? or is that a typo and should be 1/4-32?

gbritnell
12-18-2013, 09:39 PM
Sorry, typo.
gbritnell

gbritnell
12-29-2013, 02:56 PM
Here's the latest on the engine. I'm down to making small parts and finishing up the intake manifold (plugging and contouring) and plugging the water passage holes in the head. To keep with the overall look of the engine I made a starter and alternator. Although they are both non-functional the alternator will provide for tensioning the fan belt. In my original designing I didn't take into account of how the starter would bolt up and clear the flywheel flange on the block so a spacer had to be made to get the starter in approximately the right position. For the alternator mounting I had to set the head up and drill and tap a hole for the bracket. The mounting hole for the lower bracket will need to be added to the block prior to final fitting and assembly.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1209_zps5138589b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1209_zps5138589b.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1212_zpsbc58fb09.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1212_zpsbc58fb09.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1215_zps3cf598aa.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1215_zps3cf598aa.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1218_zps27983884.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1218_zps27983884.jpg.html)

gbritnell
12-29-2013, 03:00 PM
Here's a few more pictures of the starter and alternator.
gbritnell

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1221_zps94f0212b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1221_zps94f0212b.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1224_zpse778dd62.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1224_zpse778dd62.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1227_zps0a55eb85.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1227_zps0a55eb85.jpg.html)

PStechPaul
12-29-2013, 04:02 PM
Beautiful work.

Just wondering, how do you start the engine without the electric starter motor? And have you (or others) made working starters or alternators? I'm not sure if such electrical components scale down very well. I have thought about making working models of circuit breaker test sets like I have designed, but I have not really looked into the details. Perhaps I may try to make a small transformer and see how it works.

It might be more interesting and useful to make a small motor, especially something like a three phase induction motor rather than a brushed DC motor which are already made in tiny sizes for model trains and cars. I find it exciting to design and build something that has never been done before, even if it is not really practical. And that is probably the primary allure of model-building. :)

sasquatch
12-29-2013, 04:09 PM
Thanks for the nice updates again Geo.

gbritnell
12-30-2013, 12:56 AM
Hi Paul,
In the picture of the flywheel you will see a cylindrical boss on the outboard side. This is for a one way bearing. I use a drill motor with a hardened dowel inserted into the one way bushing to start the engine. The largest engine I have is still too small to make a scale starter for. A friend has a V-8 engine that has a starter on it. He used an RC car motor and geared it way down. It's starts the engine fine but is just out of scale. As far as alternators or generators go you could bury a small electric motor inside the housing to produce a DC voltage but here again to stay within size parameters you wouldn't get enough voltage to even run the ignition system.
gbritnell
http://youtu.be/fRVYYtdhG_8
http://youtu.be/FTtyO_voUU0

gbritnell
01-04-2014, 08:37 AM
Gentlemen,
This will be a final update for awhile as I have a portrait to do for a cousin's wife as a surprise.
All of the major operating components have been made. All that's left is the bolt on pieces of which the fan is one of them.
To replicate the full sized fan I needed to make a stiffening rib down the length of the blades at the centerline. If I were to do this on both the front and rear blades with the same die then the front blade wouldn't fit over the rear. If I made the front bead larger so then would fit together then the 2 blades would look irregular. To solve this I would make the front blade with the cross beading and then make the rear beading stop at the edge of the front blade.
To accomplish this I made up a die set from some old aluminum fixture plates. I cut the cavity to hold the blades tightly and milled the half round with a .062 ball mill to accept pieces of drill rod.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1248_zps58768a1b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1248_zps58768a1b.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1244_zpsf104ed89.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1244_zpsf104ed89.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1264_zps1a6961ba.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1264_zps1a6961ba.jpg.html)

sasquatch
01-04-2014, 08:49 AM
Thanks for the pics Geo, would appreciate seeing the finished portrait when you have it finished, your'e art work is outstanding.

gbritnell
01-04-2014, 08:49 AM
I cut 2 pieces of .032 aluminum sheet for the blades and tried out the die. It worked fine so the next step would be to put the twist on the blades. For this I made another set of tools, one a clamping block with a groove cut through the middle of it to clear the pressed rib and the other with a shallow slot to allow it to sit squarely against the blade.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1270_zps30eb2dc0.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1270_zps30eb2dc0.jpg.html)
I then needed another clamping tool that would allow me to twist the blades. I made this from a piece of scrap stock. It had a clearance groove one one side and was held together with 2 8-32 screws.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1273_zpsde585d37.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1273_zpsde585d37.jpg.html)
gbritnell

gbritnell
01-04-2014, 08:52 AM
Here's several pictures of the blades after being formed in the die.
gbritnell

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1251_zpsa4918212.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1251_zpsa4918212.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1255_zps29efe6a3.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1255_zps29efe6a3.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1246_zps9481a113.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1246_zps9481a113.jpg.html)

gbritnell
01-04-2014, 09:03 AM
Here's the setup for twisting the blades. I had done some experimentation prior to bending the finished blades and found that I needed to radius the edges of the clamping fixtures because the aluminum would tear at the edge when twisted. I also tried out different thickness spacers to allow room for the twist.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1277_zps53224532.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1277_zps53224532.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1279_zps59e634fa.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1279_zps59e634fa.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1282_zps8e9744ee.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1282_zps8e9744ee.jpg.html)
Now came the snag or should I say a couple of snags. The first one was that the clamping blocks were made the same width of the blades which at first would have seemed appropriate but with the radius on the edges allowed the blade to twist within the .600 width. What this did was to not allow the blades to sit flat against one another. The second problem was now how am I going to lay out the holes and drill them for the mounting bolts?
While making up new clamping blocks and figuring a different plan of attack I at least was able to hold the first set of blades against the engine and found that they looked a little too small so prior to making the second set I also modified the beading fixture to hold longer stock, (.150 longer).

gbritnell
01-04-2014, 09:10 AM
With all the new clamping pieces made and the fixture enlarged I cut 2 new blanks. This time I used the beading fixture to hold the blanks for drilling before doing any of the other operations.
with the drilling finished I then went through the same steps as before, beading and twisting.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1288_zps8caafe3f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1288_zps8caafe3f.jpg.html)
This set came out just like I wanted and the length looked much better.
To finish the blades off I needed to put the proper radii on the ends of the blades and then bend the tips slightly. I'm not sure why the tips are bent, it must have something to do with aerodynamics.
Here is a picture of the finished fan mounted on the water pump pulley.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1295_zps452e286f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1295_zps452e286f.jpg.html)

flutedchamber
01-04-2014, 10:47 AM
I write this with my mouth agape. Go take a well deserved rest. Amazing, just amazing. I give it a 94 out of 10 rating.

EddyCurr
01-04-2014, 08:08 PM
Proportions of the fan look just right. Well done.

The images and text are very helpful for understanding how
the results were achieved.

.

gbritnell
04-15-2014, 05:56 PM
I haven't kept up with posting the engine progress mainly because I have been away helping my bother-in-law finish up some hot rod Ford 8N tractors. The engine needed to be disassembled for some final machining operations, crankcase vents, drilled and tapped holes and mainly to move the dipstick boss. There was interference between the dipstick and one of the counterweights on the crank so the old boss had to be machined off, a patch made and fitted and the new boss machined. Everything went well so the engine was cleaned and reassembled. The spark plug wires were made and the timing was set for the initial start up, that's when the holdup occurred. For any of you living in the northern Ohio area we have yet again more snow and cold so the planned first fire-up will have to wait until later in the week.
For now here's some pictures of the finished engine. The plan is to have it up and running for the NAMES show at the end of the month.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1993_zps39cedb68.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1993_zps39cedb68.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1994_zps9c2af2de.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1994_zps9c2af2de.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1997_zps7c03487d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_1997_zps7c03487d.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2000_zps2ea2fed9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2000_zps2ea2fed9.jpg.html)

gbritnell
04-15-2014, 05:59 PM
I haven't kept up with posting the engine progress mainly because I have been away helping my bother-in-law finish up some hot rod Ford 8N tractors. The engine needed to be disassembled for some final machining operations, crankcase vents, drilled and tapped holes and mainly to move the dipstick boss. There was interference between the dipstick and one of the counterweights on the crank so the old boss had to be machined off, a patch made and fitted and the new boss machined. Everything went well so the engine was cleaned and reassembled. The spark plug wires were made and the timing was set for the initial start up, that's when the holdup occurred. For any of you living in the northern Ohio area we have yet again more snow and cold so the planned first fire-up will have to wait until later in the week.
For now here's some pictures of the finished engine. The plan is to have it up and running for the NAMES show at the end of the month.
gbritnell
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2024_zpsc48e109f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2024_zpsc48e109f.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2021_zpseb5e88dc.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2021_zpseb5e88dc.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2018_zpsfa77ad7f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2018_zpsfa77ad7f.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/gbritnell/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2015_zps1ba93075.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbritnell/media/FORD%20300%20SIX%20ENGINE/IMG_2015_zps1ba93075.jpg.html)

gbritnell
05-09-2014, 02:01 PM
Gentlemen,
The engine is running. Having been away for almost 5 weeks I was in a rush to get it running for the NAMES show but that didn't happen. My apologies to those fellows that came to the show to see it running. This is the second running. I fired it up earlier in the week but had a few adjustment and modifications to make.
It seems like the air bleed hole in the carb needs to be a little bigger because it takes too much adjustment on the main needle to go from idle to high speed.
So far everything seems to be working well. It looks like it will need a different seal in the timing cover because it leaks a little.
Here's the link to the Youtube video.
http://youtu.be/tdrEHY3uqqs
gbritnell

topct
05-09-2014, 02:43 PM
Well done.

To paint or not?

atomarc
05-09-2014, 03:05 PM
I think that engine is absolutely incredible..beautiful, accurate scale and all done without the aid of any CNC machining. What's the story on the beautiful scale radiator?

Stuart

Willy
05-09-2014, 03:13 PM
Very nice George, must have been a bit of a euphoric moment when it first breathed life on it's own.

I realize you are just in the preliminary stages of the tune and still dialing the engine in. I did notice that the #1 cylinder showed a lot of flash-over between plug boot and cylinder head. I'm sure your are very aware of this but wondered how it ran as nice as it did with one cylinder missing. Nice big spark from the ignition at any rate.
I can hardly wait to hear it after it's running to your satisfaction.

Beautiful project George, you have every right to be very proud of the tremendous time and talent that it took to complete.

gbritnell
05-09-2014, 04:54 PM
Hi Stuart,
Believe it or not I had seen a similar radiator on another fellow's engine. When questioning him about it he said it was for cooling electronic equipment and that they were available on Ebay. I did a search and sure enough there are a variety of sizes available and for quite reasonable prices. The deciding factor was if it looked good enough to fit the engine and the answer of course is yes. This particular rad had 2 outlets on the top so I filed one off and made a plug for it never giving much thought to the arrangement. While drilling the center hole for the fill neck I noticed a baffle inside, aha, the flow goes in one side and out the other. I reached inside with a small burr and removed most of the baffle then made another inlet on the bottom corner. Now it flows in the proper direction.
gbritnell

Mtw fdu
05-09-2014, 04:56 PM
It would be good if you can upload some drawings etc if you have them please. It would be good to build.

Mtw fdu.

sasquatch
05-09-2014, 05:02 PM
Thanks much George, your'e workmanship is a great inspiration, and the postings of it here are greatly appreciated.

John Stevenson
05-09-2014, 05:53 PM
Do threads like this one make any of the rest of you think about taking up a different hobby? They sure do me..... I just am amazed.

Somewhere in all that I would suppose I'd likely turn a crank the wrong way, and mess up some part that I had 40 hours in.... I believe that would annoy me a tad..............

And that's assuming I got that far to begin with, which by itself is pretty doubtful.

True story,
Back in about 2007 Model Engineer / Model Engineers Workshop organised a show at Ascot racecourse in the UK, this was the centenery of something or other. We were there running some CNC's as psrt of the past present and future part of the hobby.

Just where we were standing was an escalator that went up two floors to some hospitality suites and in one of these were the collected works of Cherry Hinds. Cherry Hinds is well worth a Google as being quite famous as one of the few female model engineers she is also very skilled. Possibly the most skilled of living members ? As I say do a google and make your own minds up.

It took me a while to twig on what was happening but a group of friends would take the escalator up talking and being quite animated, then about 1/2 to 3/4 hours later this same bunch would descend all quiet and pensive. I pointed this out to some people on the same stand as us and the reply was yes they had been up, seen the standard of the work and knew they would never, ever to be able to achieve this standard.

saltmine
05-09-2014, 06:12 PM
Great job George. BTW, I have an identical radiator on my computer. I notice the "flash-over" that Willy mentioned, too. But, I perceived it as the gasket on the plug leaking, like it might not be sealing properly or it's not tight. Who needs CNC?

One of Ford's better engines. I had a 240 in my '55 Ford sedan. Went out one morning to drive to work, fired up, and drove off. About a block down the street, #2 connecting rod came through the side of the block, knocking the generator off, into the radiator, punching a hole in it. Part of the rod continued onward, shattering the battery case, leaving me "dead in the water". I sold it to a scrap dealer. Amazingly, the old engine fired up and had enough power to drag itself up onto the scrapper's tow truck, for its last ride. (it had a LOT of miles on it)

gbritnell
05-09-2014, 09:29 PM
The flash-over that has been mentioned is actually a leak at the plug seal. I don't have any gaskets on the plugs but will make some small copper rings and anneal them so they're soft. With the plugs being so tiny (8-36 thread) I really didn't want to crank down on them. Whenever an engine gets finished (machined) there's always hours of tinkering and modifying to get things right.
Thanks for looking and commenting.
gbritnell

vpt
05-09-2014, 10:36 PM
Very nice job! Sure doesn't sound like the 300 in my 89 F250 though. :D

Thank you very much for sharing the entire build and video here! These are a personal favorite engine of mine and I loved every post you made of this thing!

Willy
05-10-2014, 02:38 AM
The flash-over that has been mentioned is actually a leak at the plug seal. I don't have any gaskets on the plugs but will make some small copper rings and anneal them so they're soft. With the plugs being so tiny (8-36 thread) I really didn't want to crank down on them. Whenever an engine gets finished (machined) there's always hours of tinkering and modifying to get things right.
Thanks for looking and commenting.
gbritnell

George,maybe it's,(electricity) one of those things you can't scale down??? Not to worry...it's beautiful!