PDA

View Full Version : Never Wet



randyjaco
11-13-2013, 10:15 AM
This is an interesting video. I wonder what else it can be used on and how long the coating lasts?

http://laughingsquid.com/rust-oleum-neverwet-superhydrophobic-coating-that-makes-everyday-materials-repel-liquid/

Randy

A.K. Boomer
11-13-2013, 11:07 AM
The surface tension repelling capabilities in that one example of the flat glass was amazing, would like to have it on the windshield of my car as soon as I find out the CEO does not die of cancer in 10 years...

macona
11-13-2013, 11:11 AM
This is an interesting video. I wonder what else it can be used on and how long the coating lasts?

http://laughingsquid.com/rust-oleum-neverwet-superhydrophobic-coating-that-makes-everyday-materials-repel-liquid/



Randy

A friend picked up a can. Says it is not very useful. Coating is fragile and does not last long. And it makes everything white from the powder.

HAP
11-13-2013, 12:10 PM
Got tired of hard water deposits on my shop drinking fountain. I bought some to try on it. I can tell you there will never be one drop of standing water in the basin now! That stuff is pertty cool. It does change the appearence and texture form smooth satin SS to a gritty frosted bluish tint. But it really does work. As long as you do not have to touch it or expose it to UV, it should last a while.

R,
HAP

jackary
11-13-2013, 12:18 PM
I think it was first discovered by capturing the air zone around politicians but needs careful further processing

A.K. Boomer
11-13-2013, 12:42 PM
I think it was first discovered by capturing the air zone around politicians but needs careful further processing

I was thinking they borrowed the name from one of my X GF's...

Weekend_Scientist
11-13-2013, 12:50 PM
That's pretty fun stuff!

The reason the coating looks frosty is that it is extremely rough at a scale of tens of nanometers to a few microns. The way you make a superhydrophobic coating is by taking a normally hydrophobic material like wax or some types of plastics and then making the surface extremely rough. What this does is it causes aqueous liquids to be repelled so they bead up and slide off.

For anyone wishing to play the home edition of superhydrophobic coatings, you can do the same thing with soot. Take a propane torch and cover the air inlets so that it burns with a sooty yellow flame. Then use it to coat a surface with soot (obviously this only works with materials that can take the heat). You end up with a coating that is extremely rough on the nano-scale made up of a substance that is already hydrophobic. Put the two together and you end up with your own homemade superhydrophobic coating.

KJ1I
11-13-2013, 01:18 PM
Somewhat OT, but did anyone else see the episode of Myth Busters where they tested spray-on bed liner? Myth was: it is explosion proof. Myth was confirmed. They put 2 pounds of C4 5 feet from a concrete block wall - Boom - wall gets blown through trashing the test dummy. They coat the wall with bed liner, boom, and there are no cracks in the outer wall and no damage to the inside.