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View Full Version : Cruel cruel joke...



A.K. Boomer
11-29-2013, 11:33 PM
The dilemma;

you show up at your favorite auto parts store with this in hand;

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC03276_zps9b2a93c6.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/AK_Boomer/media/DSC03276_zps9b2a93c6.jpg.html)


you seek out your favorite parts buddy who has been with you through thick and thin for decades, you look distraught - troubled but have a hint of that thing called hope in which a small part of you is banking on him that he can help you, You make sure that its slow and there are no other customers that will need help for quite sometime,,,

You show him what's in your hand and quickly explain that it's the sealing gasket on the scavenging side of the dry sump on a Lamborghini Countach 5000 QV,

you tell him that it's been sucking air and is responsible for #11 cooking it's connecting rod bearing...

you also tell him that Italy is three months out and you need to try and find one by at least next week, you then curse the Italians,,,

Then you state that it's 47 bucks and there's plenty of room in it for some profit if he can deliver the goods...

then throw in some mumbling about the crazy arss machining on the dry sump fitting and how you cannot believe they "do what they do"
and for a more convincing view you hold it up to him like this;
http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC03278_zps9570fb3c.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/AK_Boomer/media/DSC03278_zps9570fb3c.jpg.html)

He get's very excited because it's what he lives for ---- starts sorting through catalogs saying things like maybe if he can find a gasket set it would at least be a good start...
Then he glances back at the "sealing device" and says he can't believe it either,,, asks to see it and you hand it to him - he starts looking at it - prodding it - and then the inevitable happens ---------- BOING!!!

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC03286_zps0714c139.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/AK_Boomer/media/DSC03286_zps0714c139.jpg.html)

Right about when you hear the "HEY WTF" is when you make a dash for the door, ignition key already in hand for a quick getaway...

true story and a good one, just hold one end while twisting the other 180 degree's between your fingers...

Willy
11-30-2013, 12:38 AM
You're a cruel SOB!:)
As soon as I first saw the first pic I thought to myself..he should at least unroll it to give buddy a better idea of the size.

You know of course that your walking around with a bullseye on your back. Maybe not next week, maybe not even 6 months from now, but one of these days when buddy senses a disperate look in your eyes as you bend over the counter with a sob story at 5 PM on a Saturday....BANG!
You just know he'll pull the trigger when you aren't ready.

boslab
11-30-2013, 01:07 AM
If i tried it in my local parts shop id get a p off we dont do busted condoms, try boots the chemists or try a larger size next time, whens the baby due, lol
Twisted "O" ring sounds like a band to me.
A cruel but worthwhile jest, like when you start work and they send you to the stores for a glass hammer, box of left handed holes, skirting board ladder and a long weight.
Amusing
Regards
Mark
(And yes i was the young victim, regularly, their most cruel was the switchboard girl, they kept asking her to put a call out on the tannoy for mike hunt to go to the drawing office, or mike hunt ring the die shop, that went on for over 2 weeks, how everyone kept a straight face when she moaned over the tea trolly in the morning, "I'm bloody fed up with calling mike hunt"
Its a good job someone knew the heimlech or the die shop foreman would have choked to death on his kit kat, personally i thought that might be a good thing as he used to torture me)

Deus Machina
11-30-2013, 05:11 AM
Yup, first thing I thought was 'twisted O-ring.'
Then again, that sounds like something the Italians would actually do. Then charge $87 +S&H for an O-ring molded in a pre-twisted form.
That's maybe because I've actually worked or owned some Italian hardware (mostly not vehicles, thankfully) and every. Single. Thing. they make is designed in two ways.
Engineers A, B, or C got their job because Italy apparently gives tax breaks in direct proportion to how close a particular mentally handicapped individual is to making the blueprints with a crayon shoved up their nose.
Engineers D, E, F, G, and 7 are actual good engineers who are having a giggle.
And Italian engineers are the only ones I've found that can out-master the usual German pastime of designing otherwise good parts in the most backwards, irritating way.

Highpower
11-30-2013, 08:26 AM
Back in the day I worked in a dealership (not VW) that had a real intelligent donkey working in the parts department. One afternoon I went to him and told him the owner of the dealership wanted me to replace the water pump on his son's 1967 Volkswagen Beetle ASAP!!!!

He immediately jumped on the phone and started dialing one of the local aftermarket parts houses to obtain the part. Several of the other techs in the shop lined up along the parts counter to listen in. "Uh-huh.... uh-huh...." Dead silence....

"So, in other words..... these guys are ******* with me?????"

Here's your sign.....

vpt
11-30-2013, 09:12 AM
HAHA, good one!

This is one reason I would like to work at a parts counter, just for the humor. Do you have a 710 cap?

A.K. Boomer
11-30-2013, 09:39 AM
Andy the blonde 710 cap is one of my most favorite "clean" jokes...

Willy I actually didn't make a dash for it - he gave me one of those "why you SOAB" but said it with humor, I knew I was ok when he asked how to "re-load" it so he could walk on over to one of the junior parts guys and pull the stunt on him...

And I agree that while to some the twist is obvious there were factors that led up to this flying over his head in the first place, his biggest downfall was his trust in me and not to second guess :p
he also knows I get the occasional exotic and or weird vehicle in once in a blue moon,
and I also put on a good act and hit him with information overload in the process - he's actually a brilliant parts guy but it's a small town and they don't see to much out of the norm so that's why I came up with something crazy that still made a little sense... I believe he tried the computer first but then switched to the books - I think it took up about 5 minutes of his time. was a couple years back...

WhatTheFlux!
11-30-2013, 09:54 AM
These kinds of jokes are ok in small doses, but when they utterly crush and humiliate someone, or paint them as a non-functional moron it's gone too far.

I've seen senior workers set up new folks in such a way that it destroys any chance of establishing credibility or fitting in with the company, then the senior workers are all "hey hey it was just a joke we can't help if ____ doesn't understand (something obscure)."

It's not a case of "lighten up and stop coddling" it's more of a case of don't showcase your asshole-ing skills at full-power with the intent of ruining someone just because you get you jollies out of watching people suffer. Frankly I don't tolerate initiation-type pranks or ass-trolling here because I've watched it destroy team-building and severely damage new hires.

A.K. Boomer
11-30-2013, 10:10 AM
Just for the record - this guy was by far not a "new hire" and like I said iv dealt with him for decades but it does not stop there,
knew him a good decade before that and we partied together many of times as we were both hell-raisers and skirt chasers in the same small towns...

as far as having a zero policy against any kind of pranks it's just my two cents but that would be one dismal existence in my rule book - I welcome them and even get a good chuckle when they head in my direction, makes me feel like someone actually took the time to care, lol

Im sure that's how my ole bud felt, kinda special that I picked him...:)

WhatTheFlux!
11-30-2013, 10:30 AM
Just for the record - this guy was by far not a "new hire" and like I said iv dealt with him for decades but it does not stop there,
knew him a good decade before that and we partied together many of times as we were both hell-raisers and skirt chasers in the same small towns...

as far as having a zero policy against any kind of pranks it's just my two cents but that would be one dismal existence in my rule book - I welcome them and even get a good chuckle when they head in my direction, makes me feel like someone actually took the time to care, lol

Im sure that's how my ole bud felt, kinda special that I picked him...:)

I have no problem with pranking between established members of a team! Been on both sides of it myself. I have two rules: No messing with tools/equipment and nothing that affects the output of product (quality).

It's the mean-spirited pranks pulled on new hires (especially folks out of school lacking experience) that I don't tolerate. It's hard enough getting people who want to participate in manufacturing who have basic math and reading skills. I'll be goddamned if I'm going to let some old-timer pull some kind of humiliating jack-assery on new recruits after going through it myself.

vpt
11-30-2013, 10:36 AM
Working on your own it gets a bit boring and lonely at times. There are times I wish I had someone around to play a prank on now and then.

A.K. Boomer
11-30-2013, 10:46 AM
I have no problem with pranking between established members of a team! Been on both sides of it myself. I have two rules: No messing with tools/equipment and nothing that affects the output of product (quality).

It's the mean-spirited pranks pulled on new hires (especially folks out of school lacking experience) that I don't tolerate. It's hard enough getting people who want to participate in manufacturing who have basic math and reading skills.

I hear you - it's why I stated in my OP to make sure it's slow and there's no waiting customers -
I also totally draw the line at safety,,, there are some real stooges out there that don't even consider it...

and mean and truly cruel spirited is just that, it's of course wrong,

as far as output of product im all for a little break once in awhile so people don't feel like drones - I believe it actually increases productivity if workers have a smile on their face for half the day...

The initiation thing is just fine as long as it's done to make the guy actually feel welcomed, it can go one of two ways depending on the motive and reactions afterwards (like a smile and a good pat on the back), but believe me it can be a very positive thing into NOT making the "new kid" feeling alienated...
the water pump on the 67 beetle example is a good one... and will also help the "kid" stay on his toes...



I'll be goddamned if I'm going to let some old-timer pull some kind of humiliating jack-assery on new recruits after going through it myself.

yeah but lookie how you turned out :p

saltmine
11-30-2013, 10:53 AM
I seem to recall something that later proved no to be a joke, while working at the first Datsun / American Motors dealer in town. I was just a dumb kid, and an apprentice to boot. I was given a little Datsun "Fair Lady" sports car with an oil leak. My mentor told me to pull the engine. Puzzled, I did what I was told. Once we had the engine out, and upside down on the stand, I pulled the pan and marveled at what I saw. There, nestled peacefully inside the Japanese copy of a Morris Garage B engine block was a reasonable copy of the crankshaft, faithfully machined...as per the blueprint. With the rear main bearing cap off, the oil leak was obvious. Typical of most European engine designs, at the time, there was no seal at the rear of the crankshaft. Just a close fitting cavity and a machined screw thread on the crankshaft, apparently to push the oil back into the crankcase, while it was running. (just like a VW). My mentor pointed out that someone who lives across the ocean had inadvertently flipped the production drawing over, or the blueprint had been reversed when it was printed. The screw thread on the crankshaft was backward! Any oil foolish enough to venture close to the thread while it ran was unceremoniously tossed out, oiling the clutch as it left. The Datsun people were aware of the problem, and there was no diagnosis time to bother with. Just replace the crankshaft....And so it went, that spring, summer and fall. Your's truly, a young, smart-ass, apprentice mechanic changed crankshaft after crankshaft.....I should have run when I had the chance...

WhatTheFlux!
11-30-2013, 10:58 AM
yeah but lookie how you turned out :p

Humorless late-30ish geezer who sucks all the fun out of the room? OH THE HUMANITY. :D

vpt
11-30-2013, 11:12 AM
I seem to recall something that later proved no to be a joke, while working at the first Datsun / American Motors dealer in town. I was just a dumb kid, and an apprentice to boot. I was given a little Datsun "Fair Lady" sports car with an oil leak. My mentor told me to pull the engine. Puzzled, I did what I was told. Once we had the engine out, and upside down on the stand, I pulled the pan and marveled at what I saw. There, nestled peacefully inside the Japanese copy of a Morris Garage B engine block was a reasonable copy of the crankshaft, faithfully machined...as per the blueprint. With the rear main bearing cap off, the oil leak was obvious. Typical of most European engine designs, at the time, there was no seal at the rear of the crankshaft. Just a close fitting cavity and a machined screw thread on the crankshaft, apparently to push the oil back into the crankcase, while it was running. (just like a VW). My mentor pointed out that someone who lives across the ocean had inadvertently flipped the production drawing over, or the blueprint had been reversed when it was printed. The screw thread on the crankshaft was backward! Any oil foolish enough to venture close to the thread while it ran was unceremoniously tossed out, oiling the clutch as it left. The Datsun people were aware of the problem, and there was no diagnosis time to bother with. Just replace the crankshaft....And so it went, that spring, summer and fall. Your's truly, a young, smart-ass, apprentice mechanic changed crankshaft after crankshaft.....I should have run when I had the chance...



I remember you telling this story one other time I think here. Sounds like a great time! Also sounds like an opportunity of making a jig and a patch with a sleeve and seal to fix the problem.

CarlByrns
11-30-2013, 11:27 AM
With the rear main bearing cap off, the oil leak was obvious. Typical of most European engine designs, at the time, there was no seal at the rear of the crankshaft. Just a close fitting cavity and a machined screw thread on the crankshaft, apparently to push the oil back into the crankcase, while it was running. (just like a VW). My mentor pointed out that someone who lives across the ocean had inadvertently flipped the production drawing over, or the blueprint had been reversed when it was printed..

Oldsmobile had a similar factory goof with the 455. The crank had a knurled band (like this: \\\\\\\) at the rear main bearing as a primitive oil pump/slinger. It should have been like this: ///////.

A.K. Boomer
11-30-2013, 11:33 AM
Gawd how can you screw that one up, just crazy...

epanzella
11-30-2013, 11:36 AM
The laff may be on you when you go back to this guy for 350 chevy rings and he says "never heard of 'em".

Guido
11-30-2013, 11:44 AM
Can well remember the '58 Oldsmobile with the air bag/ride suspensions. So many would fail that GM furnished a stubby piece of wood 2 x 4, nicely painted black, along with the usual jack and lugnut tool in the car's trunk.

Instructions were included on using the 2 x 4 block as a wedge in the suspension so's to be able to get the car back to a dealer for air bag repairs.

saltmine
11-30-2013, 05:14 PM
And all of these years I thought that block of wood was kind of a wheel chock when you changed a tire. Another one that bit a buddy of mine real good was the fact that some 348 Chevy V-8 engines were not bored for a pilot bushing in the center of the crank. Apparently, somebody at GM decided they would save a few cents by eliminating that particular machining operation...Fortunately, it was only on the 348 and only automatic transmission cars. My buddy decided to replace his Turboglide transmission in his '58 Chevy Bel Aire rag-top after a vigorous Saturday night on Van Nuys Blvd...(he blew the snot out of his turboglide). He was planning to install a four-speed Muncie manual transmission. Things went well, at first. The shelled transmission was removed, and the manual transmission flywheel was bolted on. A new clutch & throw-out bearing, then the bellhousing and last, but not least, the transmission was lifted into place. Unfortunately, the transmission stopped short (about 1") and nothing he could do would move it the rest of the way. He called me, and after looking at it for a few, we pulled the trans and everything out, to look at the flywheel & the back of the crank. The hole where the pilot bearing was supposed to reside was not there. The relief in the crank was just enough to provide a center for the flywheel to engage. We sat there under the car for a few minutes, looking for all the world like a couple of monkeys who had encountered something neither of them had ever seen. I could see no other way, the engine had to come out, and the crank had to be replaced....or bored to fit a pilot bearing. My friend wasn't convinced, and the next day, armed with a big 'ol clumsy 1/2" Delta "shovel handle" drill and a brand new 1" drill bit, proceeded to drill out the rear of the crankshaft....or should I say attempted to. I'm not sure of what grade of steel they made the crank out of, or what his method was, but a cursing, sweaty hour later, he'd only managed to polish the center of the crank. I discovered later that in his frustration, he had chopped off the pilot shaft with an oxy-acetylene torch and ground the end flat with an angle grinder. I guess it did the job...but for some strange reason, he could never keep a clutch in it.

darryl
11-30-2013, 06:01 PM
Not long after I started my first real job in the electronics field, I was sent to another shop down the street for a bag of electrons. I wasn't falling for it, but all straight-faced I left our shop to visit the other. Once I got there, it became obvious that they had been tipped off that I was on my way. I had a good chuckle with them about it all, and then got the paper bag blown up and tightly sealed to bring back. Had a good laugh about that. In the years since, I sent many a new person to the other shop for the same thing- most actually fell for it.

We had a parts girl once who I asked to order me a polarotor motor- she just looked at me and said 'I ain't ordering that'. :)

saltmine
11-30-2013, 06:41 PM
While working at the dealer, we had 55 gallon barrels to use as trash containers. A lot lizard with some time on his hands painted them up and we used to throw our scrap and trash in them and when they got full, one of the lot lizards would come around with the old shop truck, load them up, and dump them into the shop's dumpster. We had one kid who prided himself in his muscle building prowess, and used every chance he got to show off....So, we decided to have a little "fun" with him. On his normal day to empty my trash, we filled my barrel with old newspapers, paper towels and anything else we could find that would fill the barrel, yet be light enough for me to pick up with one hand. unbeknownst to our resident "Charles Atlas" we were also filling an identical barrel with old cylinder heads, manifolds and engine blocks. Then, when he came by, to pick up the barrel, he discovered that even with all of his muscle, he couldn't budge it. He went to get one of the other lot lizards to help him pick it up. While he was gone, we removed the barrel with the forklift, and replaced it with the feather-light one. As he rounded the corner, with the other kid in tow, I asked him ,"Where did you go?" He said he went to get help so he could pick up my trash barrel and put it in the truck...I grabbed the barrel, with one hand, and tossed it into the back of the truck. (his eyes were as big as pie-plates) So, he tells the kid he didn't need his help. As they walked away, one of the guys snatched the light barrel out of the truck, and I set the heavy barrel in, with the forklift. And we watched as he finished loading up the rest of the barrels. Once he gets to the dumpster, he realizes the barrel has gained weight, again, and called the shop foreman, for help. The foreman was in on the gag, so he told the kid to go upstairs and get the trash cans out of the locker room, and he'd be right there....I replaced the heavy barrel with the light one, and when the kid came out of the locker room, the foreman easily lifted the light barrel out of the back of the truck.. His showing off declined quite a bit, after that.

WhatTheFlux!
11-30-2013, 07:26 PM
I did pull a joke once during my all-too-brief career working in sheetmetal. And this has nothing to do with my "brief" career -- I just decided to go back to plastic.

At that point I was a fairly clumsy welder... still am. My talent/skill was press-brake work. I got on the bad-side of the old-gas-bag in the corner because "damn kids" aren't supposed to be able to calculate bend allowance and actually bend things the RIGHT way, while he still took at least a dozen blanks to set up a 90 degree bend. Well this was NOT going to stand so he decided to throw a screaming fit and "warn" me to mind my place in the press-room lest he decide to take this up with "the authorities." He was an old union-man, the shop had a union years ago but was union free while I was there. All bluster and noise from a blowhard with an over-inflated sense of worth.

Now I wasn't about to take that kind of abject bull**** from anyone, especially the threat... so I waited for him to go to lunch. I put down my task... got some steel out of the scrap bins... the portable MIG and the proper safety gear... and Blowhard's toolbox.

Now the entire shop was quiet, as everyone was trying NOT to watch the damn-new-guy do SOMETHING... I rolled his box over to the steel I-post that held up the roof. Turned his box around just so, and ground the paint off the sides and the post. I then proceeded to weld three steel straps to his box, and the post.... ironically these anger-revenge fueled welds to this day remain the BEST welds I have EVER laid down. It's as if my own fury had taken form as the arc... but that's just silly. :D

I rolled the welder back down to the weld-shop, clocked out for lunch. When I came back the owner was standing there with Blowhard and the welding foreman. Blowhard is turning all kinds of apocalyptic colors and snorting in fury... the owner looks right at me and goes "did you do this?"

I said "Yes."

Owner turns to the welding foreman, welding foreman says plainly "Best welding job I've seen in awhile. Mind lending a hand in my department when things get slow?"

Owner shrugs, walks back in his office followed by Blowhard screaming and making threats that would have carried weight in a union shop... but not here.

I stayed there another 18 months... during which time Blowhard said not a word to me, and the rest of the shop kind of gave me a wide berth.


Yeah I know that violates my "don't mess with someone's tools" comment... in fact I kind of adopted that stance AFTER this incident because I did a number on his perfectly good toolbox. Felt SLIGHTLY bad about that. ;)

Doozer
11-30-2013, 07:27 PM
Ask for '57 Mustang parts.

-D

mike4
11-30-2013, 08:53 PM
Had an apprentice at a shop that I worked at who always made a point of being the first out the door at finishing time , he would grab his backpack run to his dirt bike and roar off.
This was brought to a sudden halt by the shop foreman , the kids bag was loaded with 1" plate offcuts one afternoon .
We were all standing quietly in the shop seeming discussing a machine setup , when in rushed Billy grabbed the bag and promptly crashed to the floor , we all erupted in laughter as we calmly filed out to the car park .
He never did rush out again , and to the safety people he DID not get physically injured just his ego was bruised.
And I would do the same again if necessary , practical jokes in the workplace if carried out with some thought actually do help form long lasting friendships .
Michael

The Artful Bodger
11-30-2013, 08:54 PM
It was a very small airport but it did have a control tower. We had one bright as a button, newly graduated air traffic controller who knew the answers to everything job related or not, a real know it all.

One evening two of us turned on the radio in a down stairs office and called the tower pretending to be an arriving aircraft, of course the young fellow carried out his duties to the letter issuing the appropriate clearance etc. We called him again a few minutes later to advise we were on approach to land and we could hear him walking around upstairs obviously scanning the skies for our imaginary aircraft. We played the whole landing and getting a taxy clearance etc all right up until we asked "OK to park here?". The poor guy hesitated and said something like "I guess so". Then we went up to the tower and he was white as a sheet and shaking like a leaf. We never did tell him....

1-800miner
11-30-2013, 10:28 PM
I had to make a left turn off main street to pull into out auto parts store.Just before it,on the same side was the funeral home.
I sat with my turn signal on for half an hour waiting for the biggest funeral procession to pass in front of me.
Seems like the entire town turned out for whomever died.

After they passed I went into the auto store and asked who had died.
Dick looked at me with a straight face..."The guy in the front car"

Highpower
11-30-2013, 10:55 PM
I had a first day on the job "welcome" I'll never forget. I was young and a little wet behind the ears, but excited to be starting a new job in a shop that had some promise. Throughout the morning the shop foreman would stop me and tell me to take the shop towel out of my back pocket. He said he had a rule in "his" shop that no one was allowed to be seen with the offending red colored cloths hanging out in the open. :confused:

Being the new guy I complied of course, but it wasn't long before the habit unconsciously kicked in again. "HEY! I told you not to have any shop towels hanging out of your pockets!!!" Yeah, I know -- sorry.....

Time went on and right before noon he came over to me and said the company buys all new employees lunch on their first day. So we went over to the cafeteria that was across the street. Three or four of us were all standing in line with our food trays making our way over to the cashier. Suddenly I hear several people sitting out at the tables making gasping noises and I think I heard a OMG! Then I smelled something odd and turned to see my new co-workers giggling.

Yep. He had reached behind me with his cigarette lighter and set the shop towel on fire......
"Told you not to leave those things in your pocket."

Turns out he was THE shop prankster, and there was no such shop rule.
He DID buy my lunch though... HAHA.

saltmine
11-30-2013, 11:05 PM
That airport story reminds me of one told me by a Marine helicopter pilot training at Miramar Naval Air Station. He and his instructor were the last ones to land one evening, and due to an errant gust of wind managed to bounce the UH-1 he was flying pretty hard. Some of the shaft supports had torn loose in the tail, and it started to vibrate real bad. He called the tower, and requested a go around and a clear runway. Upon touchdown the tail boom fractured and he had a blade strike. With pieces flying off in every direction, him and his instructor careened down the runway, throwing speaks everywhere. The tower called, "Do you wish to declare an emergency?" To which he replied, "Uh, not yet. We're not through crashing yet."

aboard_epsilon
12-01-2013, 08:23 AM
Looks like they have a habit of doing that

here's one 7 years ago when I rebuilt my rover, I was wondering what was going on with it then. also where the oil pick up pipe attaches .

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/rover%20420/oilpickup.jpg

all the best.markj

sasquatch
12-01-2013, 09:19 AM
One of the best that i saw when i worked in a GM dealership:
They had a young guy there as a "Gopher", not overly bright, and he never shut up. Always yakking away to everyone while sweeping or emptieing garbage etc.
One day he was a real PITA , to get rid of him for awhile the parts super called him over and sent him down to the jobbers to pick up a gallon of "Checkerboard" paint, due to they decided to paint the rear bumper on the tow truck.
Away the kid goes, (he had to walk as he had no license,) they call the jobber, he fills an empty new gallon can with water, and marks it Checkerboard paint----DO NOT SHAKE!!
Kid arrives picks up the gallon with the jobber telling him NOT TO SHAKE IT, KEEP IT STILL and upright, so the black and white doesn't get mixed up!!!
So we watch, and here comes the kid walking carefully, keeping the can still, and brings it in and very carefully sets it on the parts counter.
We had a great laugh over that for years.

1-800miner
12-05-2013, 09:42 PM
My neighbor kids showed up with some blasting caps the found at an abandoned site.
I had them show me the place and found a few more.

I stored them out back for a while then called the local sheriff to send a deputy out to get them.
They didn't tell the kid what he was coming after.

When he showed up I had the caps in a well cushioned box,all ready to go.
I handed them to him,he asked what was in the box and I told him.

He turned white and shoved the box back to me. He said he could call the bomb squad in.
I says "Son, you are the bomb squad,they sent you".

A dozen times he asked if it was stable.

I had him open his trunk and wrapped the box in his first aid blanket.closed the trunk and assured him that he was fine.

As he pulled out the drive I yelled at him "WAIT.....GO REAL SLOW"
Called the sheriff office later that day....It took the kit two hours to drive the twenty five miles.

sasquatch
12-06-2013, 08:26 AM
Back many years ago i worked in a plant building sawmills chippers etc.
There was a crazy young guy there a welder who was always terribly hyper. Never stopped.
He'd run jump on the forklift, soon as it started the engine was wide open spinning across the concrete floor.
One day i firgured he,d be getting the forklift in a half a minute, so sneaked over and chained it to a real grouchy guys welding table.
Guy jumps on the forklift , takes off then a hell of a racket, as he is towing the grouchy guys table away!!
He stops, wondering what the hell happened, and the grouchy guy is really hollering at him for taking off with his table.
He unhooked, pushed grouchy's table back ,still getting hell from grouchy, and we all went back to work.

saltmine
12-06-2013, 12:36 PM
When I was attending high school, we had a shop teacher that must have believed that you learn more from taking tests than real world experience. He carefully divided classroom time so that nobody in the class spent more than 15 minutes actually making something or working in the shop, the remainder of the time was spent looking at his poorly welded samples and textbooks. He had no idea how advanced some of the guys in the class were. One of the guys, my buddy, actually worked in a machine shop during the summer, and was a certified welder. This "Romper Room" treatment didn't wear too well with him, so he decided to set up a little "prank". There was one welding table in the corner of the shop, with brand new fire brick in it, that the teacher used to manufacture his "welding samples" on, so, one afternoon, just before class, my buddy filled the spaces between the fire bricks with oxygen and acetylene. With no holes in the bottom of the table, the gas mixture stayed right there. That is, until our intrepid instructor strolled over to the table with his carefully cut pieces of 1/8" steel to make more "welding samples". Yes, he blew himself up. Fortunately, nobody got hurt, but we were forbidden to use shop tools until somebody came forward and admitted the atrocity.....nobody ever did.