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Fasttrack
11-30-2013, 09:03 PM
I'm trying to help out an extended family member who has an old Massey Ferguson 250 tractor. It's one of the later models so it uses the same power steering cylinders as the 253 model. The ball joint and pin are worn out and he can't run down the road with it because of the chatter in the front wheels.

A pair of replacement cylinders from the Massey Ferguson dealer is $600 and he's thinking about getting a new tractor soon so investing $600 in it is not ideal. I volunteered to replace the cylinders to save on labor but I got to wondering about just replacing the ball joint. I did find these cylinders on eBay for a little less (see below) but they're still kind of high.

Unfortunately, this version is welded to the rod on the cylinder, so there is no easy way to replace the ball joint. I was thinking I could cut the bad joint off and then connect the cylinder to one of these: http://www.abilenemachine.com/massey-ferguson-tractors-power-steering-cylinder-end-female-AM1851618M2.html

I can also get the above with a male end, which is actually cheaper: http://www.abilenemachine.com/massey-ferguson-tractors-power-steering-cylinder-end-male-AM1851617M2.html

So the question is: what is the best way to go about this conversion? I'll have to get through the chrome skin, but I assume the rod itself won't be too hard. From what I remember, the larger cylinders machined just fine after you got through the chrome and a thin hard skin on the steel. Should I grind off the chrome and turn threads on the shaft (I don't have much to work with, remember - only a 9/16" diameter shaft to start with). Should I cross drill for pins? Weld? Braze?

I was thinking about using the male version and then turning a coupler. One end would be threaded for the joint and the other end would slide over the cylinder rod. It could then be pinned, welded, brazed, etc. What do you think?

Here is what a new cylinder should look like:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Massey-Ferguson-Steering-Cylinder-240-253-360-362/220824225327?_trksid=p2047675.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%2 6asc%3D19049%26meid%3D3078789111715895151%26pid%3D 100011%26prg%3D8643%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D1811 93948505%26

mike4
11-30-2013, 09:24 PM
Is there enough travel to either fit a sleeve or turn a thread .Some of this stuff is made just long enough for the original application and does not lend itself to repairs only replacement of the rod .
Have you dismantled the cylinder to see how it is constructed , you may be able to make a replacement rod with a threaded end for the female ball joint to screw onto .
Chromed rod is readily available at most hydraulic shops or you could use marine stainless as it very tough.
Michael

wierdscience
11-30-2013, 09:24 PM
Done plenty of those over the years.Pick the rod end you like,cutoff and pencil point the rod,eyeball line up and weld with 7018 lo/hi.

Pop the rubbers off before doing this of course and you may want to do the final welding with the rod end submerged in water just incase it's one of those new fangled plastic bushed rod ends.

Oh,and if the clyinder needs new rubber,do that before welding the new rod ends back on:D

Fasttrack
11-30-2013, 10:05 PM
Is there enough travel to either fit a sleeve or turn a thread .Some of this stuff is made just long enough for the original application and does not lend itself to repairs only replacement of the rod .
Have you dismantled the cylinder to see how it is constructed , you may be able to make a replacement rod with a threaded end for the female ball joint to screw onto .
Chromed rod is readily available at most hydraulic shops or you could use marine stainless as it very tough.
Michael

Well... the tractor is 3 hours away and I didn't have any tools with me at the time. Just based on what I saw while he was cranking the wheels, there is some room to work on the rod. Not sure how much though.

I didn't even think about making a new rod. I've got some 304 SS rod sitting around that should be the right diameter. I'll have to see how it's put together. Making a new rod might be the way to go.


Done plenty of those over the years.Pick the rod end you like,cutoff and pencil point the rod,eyeball line up and weld with 7018 lo/hi.

Not sure what you mean by "pencil point" the rod? Just grind the rod to a point and weld it to the end? That sounds like a pretty simple solution too... clean up the outside so it doesn't tear up the dust seal on the cylinder and call it good...

wierdscience
11-30-2013, 11:25 PM
Not sure what you mean by "pencil point" the rod? Just grind the rod to a point and weld it to the end? That sounds like a pretty simple solution too... clean up the outside so it doesn't tear up the dust seal on the cylinder and call it good...

You'll probably find that's how the old ones where put on.Usually just a 3/8 wide welded area that sticks out just past the rod gland.By pencil,I mean a 45* chamfer down to about a 1/8"diameter point.On the ball joint,just get the cheap ones and lop the male thread off so the overall length is right,tack it up,check the fit on the tractor and if it's where you want it,weld it up.

Peter.
12-01-2013, 04:52 AM
I'm with weirdscience, just find the right coupling and weld it on. I had the end come off one of our demo machines ram a couple of weeks ago, snapped off due to a broken end pin. Luckily I had a weld set there on site for hard-facing the cruncher tips and some 60xx rods so an hour later it was glued back on :)