PDA

View Full Version : Surplus tools and contaminants?



JRouche
12-25-2013, 02:32 AM
I was thinking, after my last purchase. This baby has some BAD grinding dust on it. Nasty metal, like chromium and cobalt, I think. Its a carbide and HSS tool lap wheel. Slow speed but man did they use and abuse it. Black dust and sludge everywhere.

Why the post? Heads up guys. We are all Home Shop Machinists, my case, a wannabe :) We bring home, into our house and garage a new tool from a business that you dont know WHAT they used yer machine for.

Clean it like it was "HOT".

Great deals to be had. I got lucky a few times. But clean the old filings off the tool or machine. Ive had a few tools come from some industrial shops. They can have some nasty tidbits aboard. JR

Peter.
12-25-2013, 04:12 AM
I bought a little Rawyler horizontal mill that had been owned by a jeweller, it was contaminated with gold filings. Didn't mind that :)

914Wilhelm
12-25-2013, 05:49 PM
Makes me wonder if they do radiation checks on those old monarchs from Hanford.

WhatTheFlux!
12-25-2013, 06:40 PM
Makes me wonder if they do radiation checks on those old monarchs from Hanford.

That is a valid concern. There are a few mills here in Buffalo that were involved in the Manhattan Project and the hand-off to the AEC post-war... Equipment has been sealed and sequestered in some places. No incidents of contaminated material hitting the salvage market yet... but I wouldn't be suprised to hear of it as the city looks to redevelop "Furnacevil" and some of the browner brown-field areas... and the buildings within.

mike4
12-25-2013, 07:35 PM
If I was as concerned as some with what may or may not be on the equipment that I use and work on for customers I wouldnt do any work.
I have repaired earthmoving equipment which has operated in various site across the country and they all have had cleans before leaving site ,however when removing covers and guards we often find fine dust from the mines that the machines were operating in , some is radioactive or not to healthy to breathe. But if you are careful and follow normal industrial procedures then no problems, eg wear a mask ,wash hands before eating or drinking .

Crop spraying gear is worse as you often have to lay on the cabin floor to get acess to the item to be repaired and the chemical residues do burn your skin after a few minutes , ( its way too hot for the moon suits and they get caught on everything as well ).

Wash clothing separate from general family items.

Machine tools are relatively clean compared to this gear.

Michael

Doozer
12-25-2013, 08:35 PM
Hesitate to buy a used vacuum pump.
Especially laboratory grade pumps.
Never know what was sucked in.
Atomic or biological.

--Doozer

macona
12-25-2013, 08:37 PM
Makes me wonder if they do radiation checks on those old monarchs from Hanford.

Those were from Los alamos and they are buried someplace.

radkins
12-25-2013, 08:40 PM
About two months ago I bought an old but very solid 3PH 10" Skill bench grinder from a guy in Oak Ridge TN (I live only 25 miles from Oak Ridge), there is a heavy brass plate riveted solidly to the front of the housing that's stamped "AEC ORNL", ( which deciphers to, Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge National Laboratories) and I too have to wonder what this thing may have been used for.

JRouche
12-25-2013, 09:56 PM
And.... Jump to the Radiation net. Interesting site... JR
http://radiationnetwork.com/

radkins
12-26-2013, 08:32 AM
Not sure if it's due to radiation or other contaminates but a park area near Oak Ridge has signs warning visitors not to eat plants or fruits and berries found growing in the area. Then there was the radioactive frogs a few years ago, seems the pollution levels had dropped low enough in some containment ponds that frogs could survive (for a while anyway) and being frogs they did what frogs do and that's travel when the conditions are right such as after a rain storm. People were running over these frogs as they hopped across roads in search of new breeding grounds and traces of radioactivity was actually traced back to some of the locals' driveways. These frogs were supposedly safe unless a person ate them and since they were Leopard frogs and not the much larger Bullfrogs that are hunted for their legs that was not likely to happen but still they were loose in the environment and food for other creatures, etc.

boslab
12-26-2013, 11:43 AM
I bought a grinder, it was slightly "warm" due to the factory whare it lived grinding thoriated electrodes on it, quite a bit of dust in it, took it into work and decontaminated it, wouldent recomend breathing the dust!, fortunately we used to use and repair lots of kit with radioactive sources and make radiotracers for pipes, the thoriated dust was saved for that job!.
Could have been nasty but i knew they were using it for electrodes so checked it with my personal radiation meter, a thermo mini900
Mark

Rosco-P
12-26-2013, 12:15 PM
About two months ago I bought an old but very solid 3PH 10" Skill bench grinder from a guy in Oak Ridge TN (I live only 25 miles from Oak Ridge), there is a heavy brass plate riveted solidly to the front of the housing that's stamped "AEC ORNL", ( which deciphers to, Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge National Laboratories) and I too have to wonder what this thing may have been used for.

Considering the sheer size of such places, what do you think the ratio was of "hot" work to "regular" fabrication, repair, maintenance work? Unlikely that grinder was saw any material that was radioactive. Easy enough to steer clear of machines with such a clear link to a previous owner.

darryl
12-26-2013, 02:56 PM
Interesting to read of this possibility. I just read where Madame Curies' notebooks are too radioactive to be handled safely- and will be so for the next 1500 years.

radkins
12-26-2013, 03:22 PM
Considering the sheer size of such places, what do you think the ratio was of "hot" work to "regular" fabrication, repair, maintenance work? Unlikely that grinder was saw any material that was radioactive. Easy enough to steer clear of machines with such a clear link to a previous owner.


I figured it was OK or I wouldn't have bought it because the regulations for surplus equipment are quite strict at that facility, that is unless it was stolen or some such case as that but even that would be highly unlikely given the VERY high level of security there. Still I can't help but wonder where the dang thing has been and what it has had fed into it so when I got it I disassembled everything except the armature then pressure washed it followed by a heavy coat of paint, I felt that even with it being extremely unlikely that it was "hot" a bit of precaution does not hurt and besides now it even looks almost new!


I left that brass ID plate on the front for the "Cool factor". :cool:

darryl
12-26-2013, 03:55 PM
Seems that having even a simple radiation detector might be a good accessory tool to have these days.

boslab
12-27-2013, 02:32 AM
Seems that having even a simple radiation detector might be a good accessory tool to have these days.
Not too difficult to make, loads of little kits on fleabay, we used to make big ones in work to measure the thickness of steel on the rolling mill, it was a giant block of perspex with a photomultiplier tube attached, the source used to scan back and forth above the steel strip and the perspex block is where the radiation count was measured, little scintillation's in the block picked up by the photomultiplier, ok lots of control stuff but the principle is simple, I've retired so i don't have as much access to radioisotopes, thank heaven!
Marl

loose nut
12-27-2013, 09:36 AM
You have to research the kind you get. Sometime ago it was found out that some or maybe all scientific monitors would go to zero if overloaded. Your sitting at ground zero and the damn meter says its clean, not good. A war meter in good working condition, if you can find one, may be the best bet.

If you are that close to ground zero it probably won't matter any way.:(