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Jaakko Fagerlund
12-28-2013, 02:23 PM
Just was browsing random stuff when I came across this thing. Now that would be a nice addition, as I do have some needs for small batches of bent wires and could easily prototype the bends until correct and then just send the correct file for production in real quantities.

Has anyone seen something like this before or have any other information of such a machine? The idea is simple and "D bending would be easy to program as such, but 3D bending, well...my brain doesn't bend to that, would need a separate program to figure out the machine ccommands :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ve1zzDXlJoA

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1638882643/diwire-the-first-desktop-wire-bender?ref=live

Jaakko Fagerlund
12-29-2013, 03:26 AM
I'm pretty sure they do sell the straight wire, just like you can usually buy 1 meter length of it from hobby stores etc. The original prototype machine had a straightener, but I don't know why they dropped that one from the manufactured design.

vpt
12-29-2013, 09:51 AM
Honestly looks like a joke to me.

Jaakko Fagerlund
12-29-2013, 10:41 AM
Honestly looks like a joke to me.
Compared to..? I know it is small, it is desktop size and not in any way fast, but it fits the same category as 3D printers and other home shop sized machines and fills yet again one gap :)

If nothing more, it is a hell of a good start.

vpt
12-29-2013, 11:02 AM
Compared to..? I know it is small, it is desktop size and not in any way fast, but it fits the same category as 3D printers and other home shop sized machines and fills yet again one gap :)

If nothing more, it is a hell of a good start.



Compared to bending wire by hand. I don't know, to me it would be similar to a napkin folding machine for home use.

DR
12-29-2013, 11:32 AM
The videos show two different machines. The first is a prototype 3D bender, the second is a 2D, so what are we talking about here? With such a great idea they can't come up with $100K financing? And, how far will $100K even go to get such a product to market, not very far in my experience.

It'd be fun to have a 3D bender, but just for fun. In many years as a shop owner I don't recall ever needing light gage wire bent. We have done large runs of 1/4 and 5/16" material with eyes bent on the ends, that was done on DiAcro benders way beyond the capacity of desk top machines.

There may well be a market for desk top benders, I haven't seen it though. Possibly bending electrical wire?

As an aside, the usual steel wire used by wire shops comes on very large rolls, tons. A couple times customers thinking they could save some money supplied us with straightened and cut to length pieces to thread the ends for tie rods, etc. First problem is the wire is usually wire gauge size, for instance 1/4" "nominal" is slightly less than 1/4" (can't hold it in a 1/4" collet). The worst problem is the material is most times a tough medium carbon steel making it difficult to thread.

vpt
12-29-2013, 04:33 PM
I guess a person could make their own coat hangers and napkin holders and stuff.

camdigger
12-30-2013, 03:15 AM
Someone must think it is worth while. They have already got 177k of a planned 100k for seed money.

vpt
12-30-2013, 09:28 AM
Someone must think it is worth while. They have already got 177k of a planned 100k for seed money.



I think THAT may be the profit plan. :D

lwalker
12-30-2013, 11:44 AM
It's definitely worthwhile. There are a lot of artists and crafters who use bent wire as part of their work. This removes a lot of the labor. The question is whether it's cost effective or not.

ngray
01-05-2014, 09:07 AM
Thing you have to understand about Kickstarter, as well as a lot of the hacker / maker movement, is that very, very few of these people are going to 'make money' with this. They just want to explore what is possible, and out of that, just a handful of profitable/saleable/interesting initiatives will come out. 500 people will buy one, bend a napkin holder, and put it in a drawer. 10 people will use it to make something surprising. Just think about the number of $499 cnc router kits that are sold with 12" x 12" x 2" working envelopes, and you have the right idea.

ironmonger
01-05-2014, 10:15 AM
It's definitely worthwhile. There are a lot of artists and crafters who use bent wire as part of their work. This removes a lot of the labor. The question is whether it's cost effective or not.

Remove the labor... so... hand crafted by CNC wire bender?
This is a tool for the unskilled artist or the manufacturer of miniature structural trusses... not so much for metal crafts or art. The removal of hand labor would remove the value that allows a hand made object to command a higher price in the marketplace,

I forge iron, and anything I sell as forged is crafted by hand and hammer. I have seen 'fabricated' iron work designed and made by folks without craft skills. I won't ever speak ill of their work directly, but I try to educate the public regarding the value of hand crafted work.

The best salesman is a piece of overseas 'assembled art' placed next to a hand crafted example. In the world of iron we have three major classes of work.
Traditional: every thing done by hand with no modern joinery and no arc welders. Think 1880's
Traditional appearing: Looks like it was traditional but no visible welds or artifices of modern joinery methods.
Fabrication: made without regard to concealing the shaping and joinery.


There is no moral superiority of any of these schools of thought and practice, but there is a great deal of difference in the cost and therefore the price... just don't pass one off as something it's not...


paul

QSIMDO
01-05-2014, 12:57 PM
I think it's exciting!

Anything that holds the potential to attract more participants to "metal working" and related fields should be encouraged and supported fully and enthusiastically.

That entire site is interesting just from the diversity of ideas.

Keep 'em coming I say!

lwalker
01-06-2014, 08:00 PM
Remove the labor... so... hand crafted by CNC wire bender?

No. Think instead of where the "art" is. Do you smelt your own iron? Does a potter dig his own clay (OK, bad example: lots of them do). But for a craft artist for whom bending the wire is incidental to what they're producing, this would be useful. For example, a leather worker whose primary skill is making saddles or leather bags. Instead of buying rings, buckles, or other shaped metal off the shelf, now he/she can make those things themselves exactly how they want it, without the corresponding increase in labor cost.

ironmonger
01-06-2014, 09:52 PM
No. Think instead of where the "art" is. Do you smelt your own iron? Does a potter dig his own clay (OK, bad example: lots of them do). But for a craft artist for whom bending the wire is incidental to what they're producing, this would be useful. For example, a leather worker whose primary skill is making saddles or leather bags. Instead of buying rings, buckles, or other shaped metal off the shelf, now he/she can make those things themselves exactly how they want it, without the corresponding increase in labor cost.

Point taken, but in the case of the leather worker the iron is a very small part of the art or craft. In the case of the bent wires as art it is the product.

Which begs the point of the price of the cnc bender itself. And the software... Unless your leather crafter is mass producing his saddles and what not, he could hire some one like me to keep him in metal baubles for a very long time before he ever came close to the price of the bender. Or he could come to one of our blacksmith classes and learn to do this himself.

We don't make our own iron, but we know how.
See:
http://iron.wlu.edu/
lets see him do that with leather :p


paul

Wheels17
01-06-2014, 10:36 PM
Inspired by this for tube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ot0Cxmk2aa4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yigRgG_NIyU

or perhaps these:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQIYZ-iKuG4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCF2tQhceTM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3d1irXIZGtw

J Tiers
01-06-2014, 10:56 PM
Sheesh....

It's a good , if crude, tool.

Not everyone who bends wire into nominally "art" objects is doing it as a handcrafted "artisan" gig.... It may be incidental to anything , advertising stuff, prop accessories, etc, etc, etc.

Even "mass-produced" art...... you make one by hand, then measure it up and make dozens for sale.... the "art" is in the design, in such cases, not in the hand work. You'd hate the idea, others might not. Might be how the advertising stuff gets designed.... someone makes up one example, but the window display folks need a dozen or two.

if it will bend spring wire, custom springs for machines or gizmos would be possible.... and reproducible... at home. The manufacturers of springs have these things, but you don't... or didn't until now....