PDA

View Full Version : Automobile production...



Mike Burdick
01-04-2014, 04:01 PM
The "assembly line " sure has changed since Ford's day...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wXe-4kbrAXA

Royldean
01-04-2014, 05:01 PM
Stopped watching at three minutes, but a welding robot crashes into a part at 2:03....

darryl
01-04-2014, 05:02 PM
I liked the part where one robot lifts the hood and the others paint- and at 2:24 Edward Scissorhands lets go-

Yes, that's a far cry from Henry Fords production line.

J Tiers
01-04-2014, 07:29 PM
I just get a lot of errors from this video. It does not complete, usually errors within 20 seconds.

vpt
01-04-2014, 08:43 PM
I wouldn't mind working next to 10:30 all day.

andywander
01-04-2014, 09:26 PM
Aside from the obvious use of robots, I don't think it is all that different.

loose nut
01-04-2014, 10:11 PM
I wonder how many of those robots have bought a car.

Once the American economy, dragged down by it's debt collapses and the rest of the world follows shortly after and no one will have the money to buy anything let alone a car, just think how bad it will be for all the Chinese factory workers that will be out of work.

andywander
01-04-2014, 10:32 PM
I would bet that that factory, both directly, and indirectly in businesses to supply, program, maintain, and repair the robots, employs as many or more people as Ford's factory.

A.K. Boomer
01-04-2014, 10:46 PM
I wouldn't mind working next to 10:30 all day.

you can say that again


I wouldn't mind working next to 10:30 all day.

well i'll be damned --- ?

A.K. Boomer
01-04-2014, 11:08 PM
I liked the part where one robot lifts the hood and the others paint


that was actually very strange looking to me as they all had "sweaters" on and it was kinda creepy looking,

well - at least there's lots of work for the guy who has to grease the robots - uh - that's of course if its not another robot, or maybe they grease themselves ------ very strange, some of the most sophisticated ones Iv seen,
wait till they start talking and get into arguments --- "grease off" --- "grease you" --- "go grease yourself" --- "you better watch your language or your going to get your fuse pulled again" --- " I could give a grease"....


Edit; I do have a legitimate question for anyone who deals with these things,,, it's of course obvious that they could crush anything that got in their way including humanoids but do they at least have some built in fail-safes so that if resistance is met in areas where it's not supposed to they at least shut down instead of trying to move the building,,, seems to me that all the acceleration and deceleration and clamping efforts and everything can be broken down into power percentages and that they could then just program it to not exceed that certain percentage plus a slight bit more for keeping the false alarms at bay...

even CNC milling machines have a graph of spindle loading and XYZ and such, if that's not what they already do then why not?

Optics Curmudgeon
01-04-2014, 11:34 PM
I wouldn't mind working next to 10:30 all day.

She's a robot

J Tiers
01-04-2014, 11:50 PM
The general rule with robots of that sort is to stay out of their work envelope while they are working.... by the time they would notice the extra current, you would be already hurting very significantly.

The programming is much easier if there is no need to dodge anything but what is supposed to be in the area. Especially with no need to avoid or detect soft-bodied critters.

Dr. Rob
01-05-2014, 07:58 AM
We have a few ABB robots at work. They are generally very benign (don't cause much trouble) and are relatively low-maintenance items mechanically speaking (bearings and such don't really work very hard compared to other machinery- a certain robot maybe makes a movement from position X1 to position X5 once per minute, compared to another type of machine that cycles maybe 100 times per minute)

Idunno about welding robots though- there must be a gazillion different parameters to go through.

The heads have collision sensors. If they bump into something that they don't like, they stop. And their work area is usually built into cages or so-called cells, ie physically seperate from personnel. These cages openings are further protected by light barriers. (these can be seen in the video too, at around 4:15 and 9:30) If anything breaks the light barrier, the robot shuts down immediately.

Sometimes they are pretty touchy though, and they get cranky- if some niggling little detail in their work program upsets them, they can go on strike without further explanation until you push every damn button on the control panel at least fifty times and make them happy again.

.

Stuart Br
01-05-2014, 08:11 AM
I did a tour of the mini final assembly plant last year (Cowley, Oxford, UK). Very impressive, but unfortunately the line wasn't running as they had downtime while they were fine tuning a new automated glazing system. One interesting fact is that every car is built to order with individual specifications, external colour, wheel type, interior trim spec, accessories, etc. They did tell us how many theoretical combinations there were, I can't remember the exact figure but many thousands. One more controversial point is that many of the assembly worker are contract rather than full time staff and can be laid off very quickly if demand slows.

vpt
01-05-2014, 09:12 AM
She's a robot


Even better! No sexual harassment charges on the lunch break!

A.K. Boomer
01-05-2014, 09:16 AM
OC quit jerkin our chain, give us the year/make and model # so that we can work the rest of our lives away in hopes of achieving one...

Wait a minute, if im going to go through all that trouble I might as well get a humanoid one...