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View Full Version : _ Motorizing Milling Head with a cordless screw guns motor (video)



iMisspell
01-22-2014, 03:25 AM
Someone asked about this in another thread.
As of now, i have not writen anything up, but the video has some still images at the end with alittle text describing how i when about it. Right now im really pressed for time, but will add details at a later time.

This is the first time ive uploaded to youtube, if you have a second, please let me know how it played for you compared to other stuff you have watched, thanks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBovHzcwnsk

http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com/metalworking/26-industrial-hobbies-mill/41-motorizing-milling-head-with-a-cordless-screw-guns-motor

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Mike279
01-22-2014, 08:28 AM
The video ran fine and everything looked good. Nice project for those old drill motors. Mike

mattthemuppet
01-22-2014, 10:29 AM
neat, thanks for the video. Looks like a very tidy set up. Slightly curious about the piece of paper labelled Top^ - in case you forget?!

Quick question about the power supply. So you ganged all the 12V wires for 2 separate lines together for the +12V rails (2 separate for forward and reverse, right?) and a couple of the Grnd wires (black) for the 0V? What about the red wires twisted together out of the power supply, what are they for? Did you have to connect any wires together to trick the PSU to thinking it had a load, so that it would turn on (I vaguely remember something about this)?

I'm mulling over making a pulley+cable driven drill press table lift using a 12V window motor (or drill motor, have one of each spare) and using a PSU would be alot easier than the battery set up I was thinking of.

Timleech
01-22-2014, 10:59 AM
When I saw the title, I thought (hoped?) it was going to be a thread about a milling head for the lathe, I've sometimes pondered doing my own version of the 'Quick step' toolpost mounted milling head.
I wonder whether one of the bigger cordless drill motors would be man enough to be useful for that job?

Tim

oldjim
01-22-2014, 11:41 AM
Nicely done.
Thanks
Jim

bubby-joe
01-22-2014, 02:19 PM
I have a number of old tired drills for maximun motor torque use a drill with a planetary gear setup more torque than I can stop Keep the clutch as well, smaller B+D, lowes. harbour frt drills use a single usually plastic gear and way less torque Ask at good will to save not working ones usually free or a very small donation.

iMisspell
01-24-2014, 12:48 PM
neat, thanks for the video. Looks like a very tidy set up. Slightly curious about the piece of paper labelled Top^ - in case you forget?!

Quick question about the power supply. So you ganged all the 12V wires for 2 separate lines together for the +12V rails (2 separate for forward and reverse, right?) and a couple of the Grnd wires (black) for the 0V? What about the red wires twisted together out of the power supply, what are they for? Did you have to connect any wires together to trick the PSU to thinking it had a load, so that it would turn on (I vaguely remember something about this)?

:) The paper... i was using it for something else.

I wrote up more detailed info and its on my site (http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com/metalworking/26-industrial-hobbies-mill/41-motorizing-milling-head-with-a-cordless-screw-guns-motor), to answer your questions here:

Tricking the PSU to be 'on', yes - more info (http://pcsupport.about.com/od/toolsofthetrade/ht/power-supply-test-multimeter.htm).

The two different yellow (12v) terminals are being used for two different things, one the cordless motor, the other the LED lights.
The cordless motor only has a pos and neg led, so the power for forward and reverse are from a single yellow terminal.

The other colors are different voltage incase i ever needed it (they where already in the PSU so i kept them).

--------- alittle copy past from my site ---------
Yellow = 12v
Red = 5v
Orange = 3.5v
Black = negative

The two yellow terminals: the top one which the motor is hooked to has 4 yellow wires. The reason behind the multiple wires is to get more current/amperage and thats how they are soldered to the board (in pairs), i did not want to go crazy and re-wire every thing. The second lower set of yellow wires are powering the led lights under the mills head, even though there are two wires there, they come from the same place on the board, it was just easer to wire them together rather then de-solder or clip one of them.

You will also see two negative terminals at the bottom with multiple wires, the power supply had three sets of negative wires soldered to the board, each set had a group of four wires - again i did not want to rewire every thing so i just removed two of the sets and used the remaining set; one wire for the on/off switch you see on the back and the two terminals at the bottom just for future convenience.

The other wires you see are Red 5v and Orange 3.5v, again the reason behind the grouping of wires is to allow for more current/amperage (wires come from different places on the board). Since the wires where there i figured i might as well keep them and make them accessible in-case there is a need for that voltage down the line.

There are more wires to the power supply which i just rolled up and tucked away in case there is ever a use for them, the link above explains what the do.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

hope it helps...

mattthemuppet
01-24-2014, 02:50 PM
that's incredibly useful, thank you so much for taking the time to write that down :) This project is now officially added to my project list, currently in position 10 or 11!

jlevie
01-24-2014, 11:21 PM
I understand that this is meant to be a low cost project. But a couple of observations. I don't think the slowest speed you have will be suitable for boring, though you might get away with it. Interposing a gear reduction between the motor and the drive shaft (say something lile a 1.5:1) would have the motor operating at a higher speed yet giving the slow movement that boring needs (and somewhat better speed control). You could use a higher gear ratio and use the two speed feature for traverse (perhaps solenoid operated).

The speed controller for the motor is probably in the switch assembly. At best it will have a very rudimentary control of speed. Which could have implications for boring as you may not get uniform advance per revolution. Hacking the assembly and replacing the trigger with a potentiometer of similar value should be pretty easy. Like wise for fwd/rev switch. And it would be easy enough to incorporate a center off fwd/rev toggle switch for rapid traverse.

iMisspell
01-26-2014, 12:51 PM
Glad it helps, muppetmatt.

Thanks for the thoughts, jlevie.
If\When i move the motor and connect it directly to the lead screw, pulleys will be used so the ratio will be adjustable. The solenoid idea is great... after your post i did a quick peek at amazon and they have some auto door lock 12v solenoids for under $15. There was a post where acouple weeks ago where adding an CNC x/y table on top of a manual mills table was talked about. Its something i would like to do when time and money is available and that created the thought of just adding a seveo or stepper motor to the Z screw. More research on that will be needed...
Anyway, thanks for the post, jlevie, it gave me more to think about.

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