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View Full Version : What's a "blow-in" Card?



lynnl
07-03-2014, 05:36 PM
I received one of the recurring tips emails from Home Shop Machinist, the subject of which was using "blow-in" cards from magazines to fabricate storage tubes for end mills.

I assume that's a local term that I've never heard. What's a "blow-in" card? Is that referring to those subscription cards that I always immediately rip out and throw away?

Joe_B
07-03-2014, 05:39 PM
https://www.google.com/search?q=What%27s+a+%22blow-in%22+card%3F&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&channel=rcs Your google foo is weak my friend!

rhino
07-03-2014, 05:42 PM
Post-card sized advertizing cards that are not bound into a magazine, but inserted by blowing a burst of air at the edge of the pages and the card rides in on the air stream.

Rosco-P
07-03-2014, 07:58 PM
You could make paper tubes, reuse cigar tubes, etc. to protect endmills and taps or just buy elastic sleeving: http://www.mcmaster.com/#mesh-sleeving/=sokeke it's reuseable. Ten feet each of the first two sizes would last most people a lifetime.

Paul Alciatore
07-03-2014, 10:54 PM
PVC pipe makes good storage containers for cutting tools like end mills, reamers, odd drills, etc. And, for really small ones, I use soda straws. The bottom end of the soda straws was closed with silicon caulk. I punched a 1/8" hole in their sides with a paper punch to give it a better grip.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/EPAIII/Pix1.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/EPAIII/media/Pix1.jpg.html)

Rosco-P
07-03-2014, 11:49 PM
Knew it wouldn't be long before that image was posted again. "Tool net" or elastic sleeving as I posted above, is still cheaper (22 cents per foot) than any of your solutions, with the exception of the soda straws. Guess you haven't priced CPVC or PVC caps lately. Only the cutting edge needs protection, usually about 2".

lynnl
07-04-2014, 06:50 AM
Post-card sized advertizing cards that are not bound into a magazine, but inserted by blowing a burst of air at the edge of the pages and the card rides in on the air stream.

Thanks rhino; now it makes sense.

For some reason google just never occurred to me for this one.

DR
07-04-2014, 10:55 AM
Seems like this subject is being over-thought. Why not just use a block of wood drilled for the shank size of the tool with the cutting end sticking up? Don't most of you guy have a place on a shelf or the work bench to park the block out of the way to prevent storage damage?

With the block I keep frequently used milling cutters near the machine and choose the one most appropriate for the job at hand. Various cutting diameters, length of cut and cutter condition are visible and easily compared. I hate having to dig through cutter packaging to find a tool for a quickie job. The block of wood is moved around and holds most all the "used-but-still-good" cutters where I can find them. When a cutter is broken or damaged beyond use I remove it from the block.

I do keep new cutters in labeled drawer compartments by size in their original paper tubes. For longer term "production" type work I grab a new cutter out of the drawer.

Baz
07-04-2014, 06:59 PM
interesting side effect is I've now found out how Americans secure their gutters.