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J Tiers
07-16-2014, 08:50 AM
I have noticed that now whenever google is opened, it automatically pops up a tab with what appears to be a bunch of icon links to social media sites and what appear to be hotel reservation sites, e-commerce sites, etc. This has to be closed every time, before anything real can be done.

The list may change over time, I think there were other social media originally, but I may be mistaken about that.

Since we are not members of any of these sites, it isn't as if google is "responding to our needs" or the like.

Anyone else see that?

KiddZimaHater
07-16-2014, 09:25 AM
Google is very Creepy, in a 'Big-Brother' way.
It seems that ANY website that I go to, there will be an add on the page (NOT a pop-up) from BALIEGH Tools, or a used CNC dealer, or some type of machinery or tool company.
Internet tracking / stalking at it's best.

bborr01
07-16-2014, 09:35 AM
They're just trying to help, whether you want them to or not.

Brian


Google is very Creepy, in a 'Big-Brother' way.
It seems that ANY website that I go to, there will be an add on the page (NOT a pop-up) from BALIEGH Tools, or a used CNC dealer, or some type of machinery or tool company.
Internet tracking / stalking at it's best.

loose nut
07-16-2014, 10:03 AM
Simple solution, don't use Google. Bing works just as well.

Google admitted that they read EVERY piece of G-mail (computers do it), you can sure bet that every search is monitored and probably everything stored in the Google cloud is also read unless encrypted. All of that info is used to target people for advertisements. It's not just big brother, it's an evil corporate big brother and they care not about anything except squeezing every penny they can out of us.:mad:

Be afraid, be very afraid.

Seriously you really should be afraid.:eek:

duckman
07-16-2014, 10:37 AM
Just download ad blocker plus (will show as ABP with a stop sign) it really works good, when I sign on it shows how many ads are blocked, HSM only shows 3 right now but Practical Machinist shows between 11 and 18 blocked.

lakeside53
07-16-2014, 10:55 AM
Another +1 for Bing. If you have IE 9+ also turn on Tracking Protection (an ad blocker +) and add the "Block Google Tracking" tpl. Some sites (this and PM are fine) don't function correctly with tracking protection, but.. you can turn it on or off with one key click at the top of the page.

Weston Bye
07-16-2014, 11:17 AM
I don't know if it is only peculiar to google. I just bought an antenna from MCM and now their ads show up everywhere - on several computers that I frequent. At work, I researched a cylinder and now SMC ads show up on seemingly unrelated websites.

dp
07-16-2014, 11:48 AM
In your browser disallow third-party cookies and allow cookies for the current session only, and even then, only for sites you approve. Don't let Google be one of them. Then learn what current session means in your particular browser and how you close the session.

Some sites need cookies to be functional but only when you need that functionality. Shopping cards and on-line catalogs, for example, that retain information you're selected and need for multiple pages require cookies but only because they really want them, not because they need them.

Some sites won't work if you don't allow cookies - I close the page and move on. It's a big internet. The EU mandates cookies so I don't visit EU pages and don't miss them. I didn't authorize the EU to require that of me so I don't care.

Clean out cookies frequently. I rarely have more than ten. Be sure to clean out Flash cookies, too.

This is more controversial - join the Google boycott. Don't accept email from gmail users, don't send mail to gmail users, because Google is profiling you vicariously through the account of your email partner. Certainly don't use gmail yourself.

Or ignore it and accept that your privacy doesn't matter to you. Just don't believe you can't have privacy in today's world. There are a lot of people who have no Google footprint that are doing just fine.

MrSleepy
07-16-2014, 12:29 PM
The EU mandates cookies so I don't visit EU pages and don't miss them. I didn't authorize the EU to require that of me so I don't care.

The EU mandates that you be made aware ...if cookies are used. The EU does not mandate that cookies are used.

http://www.cookielaw.org/the-cookie-law/

dp
07-16-2014, 12:37 PM
Thanks for the clarification.

Jon Heron
07-16-2014, 03:07 PM
The EU mandates that you be made aware ...if cookies are used. The EU does not mandate that cookies are used.

http://www.cookielaw.org/the-cookie-law/

That is a good thing!
Cheers,
Jon

Charles Spencer
07-16-2014, 03:22 PM
I use Duck Duck Go to search:

https://duckduckgo.com/

metalmagpie
07-16-2014, 06:53 PM
I can't imagine why, but when I bring up google I just get the old familiar blank white page. Using FFv30. No ads at all. What am I doing wrong, er, right?

metalmagpie

J Tiers
07-16-2014, 10:10 PM
No idea.... I don't know why I get all the junk on that new tab, either. It's not on all the computers, either.

I haven't looked far into it. But I do have popups blocked.... not that they all GET blocked, but they are set to be blocked, and most are.

Bing, despite my seeing the "Bing car" around here, is not as good as google. I get considerably more results on google when I do searches. Not all are relevant, but then, not all the "bada bing" results are either.

Paul Alciatore
07-16-2014, 10:44 PM
BULLETIN!

Google is an ADVERTISING company. They make their money by selling your data to people who want to sell things to you. They "read", probably more like scan your e-mails to tie your web address and e-mail address to "known" things that you are interested in.

All of their FREE services, like G-mail, are intended to gather this information from you. Google maps: where do you want to visit? That is how they work.

And, they are not the only ones. Yahoo, Bing, and almost everybody else who gives you something free on the internet is getting something out of it, usually information about you that they can then either use directly or sell.

What really scares me is this idea of cloud storage. Just upload all your personal files to an internet site. We will store it for you. If it is free, I would run from it as fast as I can. Even if you pay for the service, I would wonder what they do with it while it is in that cloud.

These companies should be paying you to use their services. At your rates!

darryl
07-16-2014, 11:51 PM
I don't consider anything electronic these days to be free from corruption. You might buy a digital watch, but really you have no idea if it is spying on you or not. The more complicated or sophisticated a device is, the harder it would be to find out whether there's some spying capability built in. Especially where there's microphones and cameras built in- can you really believe that some organization hasn't co-opted that functionality? It's not about whether they have or not- it's more about how they can handle the large amounts of information being gathered. The only reason you don't get a notification that you were seen speeding somewhere, or talking badly of government in some way, is that it's still an enormous task to sift through the info. Of course computer speeds and capabilities improve, and so does the ability for this type of corruption to spread. I believe we're seeing merely the tip of the iceberg at this point-

You have been co-opted since before you were born- there is no such thing as privacy, our 'freedoms' as we see or understand them are only what we are allowed.

From time to time we see that it is indeed possible to hack into your most highly protected 'electronic security'- if the need arises, someone or some group will be able to 'read' you.

It would not surprise me in the slightest to learn that these so-called security programs like McCaffee, etc are actually gateways to your 'private' electronic lives.

hoof
07-17-2014, 07:06 AM
Yes, they are funded by advertisers, The way someone explained it to me once was "if your not at the corporate table, your on the menu" That made sense to me.

Ray

J Tiers
07-17-2014, 08:22 AM
News flash:
Radio is funded by advertisers. So is the newspaper (if you are old enough to remember what THOSE were). Both of those have far less intrusion into your business.

So is television, which most of you (but not me) will watch every day. The cable company knows what you watch, the radio companies do not, nor do broadcast TV companies.

ISPs, search sites, and so forth know everything. They know which of you are every day porn viewers, or frequent on-line shoppers. They know when to expect you back online, when you are likely to buy what product.

They know YOU better than you know yourself.

OK, have we figured out that advertising pays for every single thing that you do not directly pay for? And that every company wants to get their ad in front of you exactly at the moment you are looking for what they sell?

Can we get beyond that baby step?
.
.
.

The advertising page seems to be an unwanted add-in search that is not removable... it isn't installed, and it isn't on the Mozilla list of installed accessories. Several malware zappers have not found it.

I have not traced it's origin yet. Last time it showed up it was easily removed, but not this time. (MySearchDial)

Weston Bye
07-17-2014, 10:15 AM
I take the advertising as the price of admission. The cost of doing business. The trade for being allowed to participate for free. I regard it as annoying, but mostly harmless. Unless...

The advertising foisted on us could be "programmed" to influence individual decisions. More insidious would be the witholding of certain sources or websites from particular individuals during a general search based on your profile. You only get to make decisions based on the information you have available - the information that "they" want you to have.

Radio advertising could be manipulated. I listen to commercial news-talk stations (but also NPR) that seem to have a heavy government public service announcement presence in their advertising, probably for lack of local commercial advertisers. Apparently the business model works, and I am amused by the situation where government agencies are paying the freight to air the (mostly right-wing) political commentators. The repetitive PSAs seem innocous enough, and I haven't (consiously) detected any disagreeable propaganda or agenda, but...

I sound paranoid, but I deny it. I just have a better-than-average imagination-it helps when writing fiction.

Billy Hill
07-17-2014, 10:57 AM
I quit using the google. Too intrusive and sneaky. I use startpage.com and duckduckgo.com mostly now.

Black_Moons
07-17-2014, 01:26 PM
I have noticed that now whenever google is opened, it automatically pops up a tab with what appears to be a bunch of icon links to social media sites and what appear to be hotel reservation sites, e-commerce sites, etc. This has to be closed every time, before anything real can be done.

The list may change over time, I think there were other social media originally, but I may be mistaken about that.

Since we are not members of any of these sites, it isn't as if google is "responding to our needs" or the like.

Anyone else see that?

This sounds exactly like malware. Id run a few anti-malware programs (Not antivirus, for some reason anti-virus can't be assed to detect these "just a bloody goddamn nuisance" infections that hijack google/homepage/etc)

Paul Alciatore
07-17-2014, 02:43 PM
J,

That is only true in terms of degree. While it is true that the internet provides a lot more information about the individual, the radio, television, and even the newspapers know a lot about the number of viewers, listeners, or readers that they get to.

Radio and TV have the rating services which track not only the number of viewers, but statistics about them as one or more groups: age, location, spending habits, etc.

And there are ways of keeping statistics on potential customers that you may never even suspect. I spent about 16 years of my career as a TV engineer working for an advertising company. Why? Well, they did two things. First, they produced the commercials and that required equipment, crews to shoot them and editors to put them together. That was justification enough for my job, but there was another task. The company I worked for specialized in informercials, those half hour commercials that usually air in the post midnight hours or odd times on the weekends. The informercial is a hard sell. I once heard the figure quoted that only one in ten actually worked well. Others may have sold enough to be in the black, but it wasn't a guaranteed sell. They needed data on the people who watched and purchased. The system was set up so that each of the different TV stations, cable companies, and other entities who broadcast these informercials would use a different phone number for the customers to call. The answering companies kept track of the number of calls to each number and reported this back to us. Thus, we could break the sales down by many different factors depending on an analysis of characteristics of the different markets they were broadcast to. Small town, large town, professional area, working man territory, college town, etc. Not a direct gathering of information on any individual, but very useful to the advertisers. And to the advertising company. By far the largest part of my job was designing, installing, and maintaining the equipment and systems to make the multiple copies of each informercials, each with a different phone number.

Each of these advertising media keeps all the statistics that they can and uses them to help sales in every way that they can.

It is no wonder that the advertisers have embraced the internet as a sales paradise. Nothing there is free. You pay for it in information about yourself.




News flash:
Radio is funded by advertisers. So is the newspaper (if you are old enough to remember what THOSE were). Both of those have far less intrusion into your business.

So is television, which most of you (but not me) will watch every day. The cable company knows what you watch, the radio companies do not, nor do broadcast TV companies.

ISPs, search sites, and so forth know everything. They know which of you are every day porn viewers, or frequent on-line shoppers. They know when to expect you back online, when you are likely to buy what product.

They know YOU better than you know yourself.

OK, have we figured out that advertising pays for every single thing that you do not directly pay for? And that every company wants to get their ad in front of you exactly at the moment you are looking for what they sell?

Can we get beyond that baby step?
.
.
.

The advertising page seems to be an unwanted add-in search that is not removable... it isn't installed, and it isn't on the Mozilla list of installed accessories. Several malware zappers have not found it.

I have not traced it's origin yet. Last time it showed up it was easily removed, but not this time. (MySearchDial)

J Tiers
07-17-2014, 09:31 PM
Radio and TV broadcasts do not know that YOU were listening at THAT time.

Cable does. ISPs definitely do.

Google knows that, and what you were wearing, and that you didn't brush your teeth, and that you had a fight with the posslq about that, and they know exactly how you made up after the fight, for how long and ....... IOW, they know TMI.

justanengineer
07-18-2014, 12:27 AM
Yahoo, Bing, and almost everybody else who gives you something free on the internet is getting something out of it, usually information about you that they can then either use directly or sell.


+1. Even the most deceptively simple or outdated appearing sites and networks are pulling info on you constantly, the only way to prevent it is to stay inside your own bubble and off the internet.

RussZHC
07-18-2014, 01:21 AM
So how effective are apps or parts of security programs that put you, or claim to put you in "stealth" mode when doing internet searches?

Could such have the capability of "hiding" you from all or more likely most excepting of course they themselves (the program claiming to make you invisible)?

mike4
07-18-2014, 04:48 AM
I tried to remove Bing from my PC and it came back after it was restarted.

Microsoft is more invasive than a lot of the others, many programs automatically update (Mobogenie etc) there should be a way for users to stop all unwanted and unsolicted programs from being loaded or updated without the permission of the pc owner.

Apple is another corporation who forces their way into pc's without permission.

These intrusive corporations are only interested in lining their shareholders or CEO's pockets . ethics is long dead.
Michael

J Tiers
07-18-2014, 09:43 AM
So how effective are apps or parts of security programs that put you, or claim to put you in "stealth" mode when doing internet searches?

Could such have the capability of "hiding" you from all or more likely most excepting of course they themselves (the program claiming to make you invisible)?

Pretty much zip.

Your ISP knows everything, unless you access from a different wifi. Maybe then...

But your PC has a unique identifier that says it is "you" no matter what. Only if that is not accessible is it really "hidden".

BTW, malwarebytes removes most things, including "pups", which is what the advert was

loose nut
07-18-2014, 03:25 PM
The only chance you have of any stealth is if you go through an anonymizer website, preferably in another country.

J Tiers
07-18-2014, 05:12 PM
The only chance you have of any stealth is if you go through an anonymizer website, preferably in another country.
only if you "ARE THERE", since your ISP saves everything important in your (presumed criminal) online activity, regardless of anonymizers etc.... .you still go through the ISP, and they have everything.

outlawspeeder
07-18-2014, 05:30 PM
Here is a thought, right click on IE and select "Start Browsing in Private". It will stop your problem unless you log into a page.

Just saying.

J Tiers
07-18-2014, 07:14 PM
Here is a thought, right click on IE and select "Start Browsing in Private". It will stop your problem unless you log into a page.

Just saying.

The "pup" was drowned some time ago, if that is your concern.... And BTW.... NEVER USE IE.......

loose nut
07-19-2014, 09:44 AM
only if you "ARE THERE", since your ISP saves everything important in your (presumed criminal) online activity, regardless of anonymizers etc.... .you still go through the ISP, and they have everything.

True but anyone outside the anonymizer can't track back to your ISP without actually going to the anonimizer service which means some sort of government intervention, hence the "in another country" which separates it from your home law enforcement. Criminals may still be tracked back, with some effort, but it will keep the truly paranoid non-criminals safer.

Big brother and Google are watching you.:eek: