PDA

View Full Version : OT: Daughters school class goes to France



Black Forest
07-17-2014, 01:25 AM
Today my daughters school class rides their bikes to France. They do it to practice their French speaking skills. Each student had to make a list of things they would buy at the market. Once crossing over the border into France they are only allowed to speak French, even to each other. Their French teacher organized the road trip so the students get to hear and speak with "real" French speakers.

From the school it is only a 30 minute bike journey into France so it is not a long bike ride.

I told my daughter I would put decals on our pick-up and drive it behind the group as a support crew. Drive by and jump out and hand her a drink bottle as she rides buy us. Have all my tools to service her bike. Quick pick me up snacks, etc.. You know, Tour de France type of support. I got the look! And then she told me it was only a 30 minute bike trip they were making.

The school she goes to is great. The teachers are all really motivated. Whenever we go to school functions there is always a great atmosphere. Not a punk student in sight. It is a private school and if a student doesn't fit in or have a good attitude they are not there very long.

We feel very good about our daughters education and feel she is in good hands. We often let the school classes come to our place for a few days. Never have we had any kind of issue when they are here.

Nothing to do with machining except I wanted to bring tools in the truck!

chipmaker4130
07-17-2014, 02:05 AM
That's a neat thing for them to do, and you're a sport for volunteering to help. I'm glad to hear there are schools like that these days. What kind of LKW do you drive over there? (Don't tell me its a Dodge Ram!)

Black Forest
07-17-2014, 02:11 AM
That's a neat thing for them to do, and you're a sport for volunteering to help. I'm glad to hear there are schools like that these days. What kind of LKW do you drive over there? (Don't tell me its a Dodge Ram!)

I have a Toyota Hilux. No Dodge but I would like one with a diesel engine. But I don't need one and with fuel costs here it makes no sense to buy one if I don't need one. Now if my daughters interest in horses continues and she wants to go to horse shows then for sure I will buy one to haul the horse trailer!

MrFluffy
07-17-2014, 07:29 AM
Ask her to bring back a mille-feuille svp :)
That has to be one of the harder words to pronounce correctly for a germanic speaker (the foueeey bit), but theyre so tasty :D

justanengineer
07-17-2014, 08:49 AM
I have a Toyota Hilux. No Dodge but I would like one with a diesel engine.

Dang, and here I was hoping a bit of good ol' American redneckism was being spread in Europe. :P

Sounds like a great experience for the daughter. When I was in public school we took an annual trip up to Quebec over a long weekend as the school felt practicing our French was important. We also spent 10-14 days in a different country in Europe every year and they were great experiences.

Toolguy
07-17-2014, 10:18 AM
That's great BF! The shop wench has a degree in French. She spent a year in France to study. When we were in Germany for the world championship pistol match in 2012 we drove down to France for a few days and she could talk to everyone. She also speaks Spanish. Me - I didn't have a clue, but I was proud of her. She won a gold medal in one of her pistol events too!:D

Baz
07-17-2014, 06:04 PM
Perhaps some of you can come to London to learn English (I mean real English :o ). Oh heck, there's so many foreigners here now you might have a hard time finding an Englishman. I'm British, but speak English.

PixMan
07-17-2014, 06:54 PM
Given that BF is an American in Germany and I've spoken with him on the phone a few times, I'll tell you he speaks American English just fine. I'll bet his daughter speaks English fairly well too! She'll be likely capable of at least three languages by the time her trip is over. :D

bollie7
07-17-2014, 07:59 PM
Perhaps some of you can come to London to learn English (I mean real English :o ). Oh heck, there's so many foreigners here now you might have a hard time finding an Englishman. I'm British, but speak English.
When you come down here to Australia Baz, you will have to learn a bit of osstralian. ie howyougoinmate and didjahaveagoodweekend.
be aware though that nobody says "chuck another shrimp on the barby" or uses words like "streuth and crickey" :)

bollie7

thaiguzzi
07-18-2014, 12:20 AM
BF, i have a Toyota Hilux too. They are everywhere here. The most popular pick up by far. Made here too, as are all 1 ton pick ups inc Ford and Chev. Check out the Tuning Chip companies that are made in Germany for these vehicles. About 150 Euros for a plug in and go chip. Your vehicle will go from 163hp to just over 200hp and nearly 375 lb ft torque without affecting any warranty.

Black Forest
07-18-2014, 01:14 AM
Given that BF is an American in Germany and I've spoken with him on the phone a few times, I'll tell you he speaks American English just fine. I'll bet his daughter speaks English fairly well too! She'll be likely capable of at least three languages by the time her trip is over. :D

My daughter is one of those people that switch between languages with a blink of the eye. She has had French and English in school since the first grade. She is now in the sixth grade. Of course she grew up speaking English and German. It always amazes me when we go on a trip to France and she speaks French when she is there. Me, I struggle with English and that is my first language.

Where we live in Germany we border France and Switzerland. We are in either country in under 30 minutes. It always amazes me on the days we go shopping and on the same day we start in Germany, drive to Switzerland and then on to France. When we come home we have maybe driven only 60 miles(100km) and finished by lunchtime.

MrFluffy
07-18-2014, 02:16 AM
I'd guess your around basel somewhere, thats about 600km east of me :)
Its possible to loose your native language partially if you don't speak it at all, there was a report on the bbc about it with even mature older people suffering slightly, and I find sometimes I find myself searching for the right english word for something that I remember in french and I spend hours a week on english speaking conference calls still.
http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-27690891

My son/daughter are both bilingual in french and english, because I live in France, so they were born here and go to school etc here but we speak english at home and this week they are in the UK on holliday with inlaws and absolutely no language problems at all (except having to remember to mispronounce croissant in the cake shop!). I find their ability with language fascinating as they have a native accent in both, and hope they go on to learn other languages when they get slightly older.

boslab
07-18-2014, 03:01 AM
The brits however seem to be very stubborn with languges, if in they just speak louder when not understood lol, American english and English english are different, God knows where Welsh fits in anywhere.
My daughter went on a trip to Paris which is virtually a day trip from Cardiff by train, the night before she watched the film on TV, Taken, the trip were taking bets on who wasent coming back!
My French is poor mainly due to lack of lingual ability, just basics as for German too, in school i think we were taught too many languages at the same time, French, German, Welsh Spanish Latin and a bit of Italian, not very clever!
Mark

Black Forest
07-18-2014, 03:42 AM
I'd guess your around basel somewhere, thats about 600km east of me :)
Its possible to loose your native language partially if you don't speak it at all, there was a report on the bbc about it with even mature older people suffering slightly, and I find sometimes I find myself searching for the right english word for something that I remember in french and I spend hours a week on english speaking conference calls still.
http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-27690891

My son/daughter are both bilingual in french and english, because I live in France, so they were born here and go to school etc here but we speak english at home and this week they are in the UK on holliday with inlaws and absolutely no language problems at all (except having to remember to mispronounce croissant in the cake shop!). I find their ability with language fascinating as they have a native accent in both, and hope they go on to learn other languages when they get slightly older.

I know exactly what you are talking about. I often struggle to come up with the English word for something. We had an American working for us for nearly a year. It took me a while to get used to talking American English again. The slang he used reminded me of how far away from home I am! He was a carpenter and I had him doing some remodeling for me. He came from Montana and had no German language skills understandably. It was nice for me to be able to cuss someone out and have them understand what I was saying.:cool:

Hopefuldave
07-18-2014, 03:49 AM
Yeah, but the French are even more stubborn, and.don't understand a word of English unless you start off in appalling French much like.I speak, then they'll happily switch to English so they can understand you...

A couple of years ago we visited friends who moved to the Limousin, deepest darkest France in the massif centrale mountains, they were chatting in french with le Patron in a restaurant (a good friend and native of.the.area), then to us, heard an English voice saying "doesn't he speak good English for a foreigner..."

Apparently when I attempt it I sound like an urban Parisian, matches the urban Londoner I suppose!

Mike Burch
07-18-2014, 05:34 AM
Though sadly monoglot as a speaker, I spent much of much of my working life singing opera and oratorio in several other languages. The only problem with that is that one's foreign vocabularies become pretty good on matters of sex and religion, but quite useless in a restaurant.
I also spent a decade as an announcer on a classical music radio network, and with such music being the international stuff that it is, had to become tolerably familiar with the pronunciation rules for no fewer than thirty different languages. The most difficult? American, by far. One never knew just how far from the original language's pronunciation the musician's name had moved in the process of the family's absorbtion into the new country, and the consequent Anglicisation of the name. (Bernstein,for example, sounds quite different in German.)
And on the matter of absorbing the local accent, well, I recently met a 15-year-old kid, who was born in New Zealand to German parents and has lived here all her life. She is being home-schooled and thus has minimal peer contact, and the poor kid speaks English with a strong German accent!

boslab
07-19-2014, 01:20 AM
I just heared a Japanese kid with a Glasgow Scottish Accent speaking Welsh, it was funny!
Mark

MrSleepy
07-19-2014, 05:37 AM
I just heared a Japanese kid with a Glasgow Scottish Accent speaking Welsh, it was funny!
Mark
He'd only be Welsh if he had four fathers though...:).

Rustybolt
07-19-2014, 08:52 AM
My daughter is one of those people that switch between languages with a blink of the eye. She has had French and English in school since the first grade. She is now in the sixth grade. Of course she grew up speaking English and German. It always amazes me when we go on a trip to France and she speaks French when she is there. Me, I struggle with English and that is my first language.

Where we live in Germany we border France and Switzerland. We are in either country in under 30 minutes. It always amazes me on the days we go shopping and on the same day we start in Germany, drive to Switzerland and then on to France. When we come home we have maybe driven only 60 miles(100km) and finished by lunchtime.

Wisconsin and Indiana are each about an hour away. Iowa and Missouri much farther. But I only have to drive five minutes to Aurora to get mugged by several different cultures.
Your trip sounds much more fun.