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JoeLee
07-19-2014, 10:46 AM
Just wondering if any one would know if ethanol gas will corrode brass?? I know it's bad stuff. I have a 1974 Lincoln Mark that I drive once in a while to shows. I started it up last week to let it run for a few minutes as I always do, it had just over 1/2 a tank of gas. I came back 5 minutes later and the gas gauge was reading empty and the low fuel light was on. At first I had suspected a bad connection or other electrical problems, then I thought the first place to start looking is the fuel sending unit. I took an ohm meter to the unit and it read 75 ohms which is within the range of a normal working sending unit. I thought maybe the float developed a pin hole and sank. I was wrong............ when I pulled the unit there was no float on the arm!!!! I had to drop the tank to fish the float out and below is what I found.
It's obvious that this corrosion has been a long time in the making, but I've never seen one this bad.
Look at the slot across the center........ that must have been the fuel level line. I can't see how it even worked as long as it did.
Must be that there was an air bubble trapped in it that kept it from sinking and when I started it up and moved the car the splashing of the gas made it fall apart. I also put stabilizer in the tank, I wonder if that would have any corrosive effect on brass??

JL...............

http://i911.photobucket.com/albums/ac317/JoeLee09/Lincoln%20Fuel%20Float/Image001_zps77f8ff2e.jpg (http://s911.photobucket.com/user/JoeLee09/media/Lincoln%20Fuel%20Float/Image001_zps77f8ff2e.jpg.html)
http://i911.photobucket.com/albums/ac317/JoeLee09/Lincoln%20Fuel%20Float/Image002_zpse1ff35a5.jpg (http://s911.photobucket.com/user/JoeLee09/media/Lincoln%20Fuel%20Float/Image002_zpse1ff35a5.jpg.html)
http://i911.photobucket.com/albums/ac317/JoeLee09/Lincoln%20Fuel%20Float/Image004_zps8c2ef56e.jpg (http://s911.photobucket.com/user/JoeLee09/media/Lincoln%20Fuel%20Float/Image004_zps8c2ef56e.jpg.html)

saltmine
07-19-2014, 11:27 AM
I know methanol will. But, that's what the automotive industry is finding out. Our subsidized ethanol production, being forced on us, is slowly destroying various components of our cars and trucks. I remember when they first started adding ethanol to gasoline. Untold scores of Japanese car owners found themselves broke down on the side of the road. Cause? key plastic parts of their fuel injection systems were being dissolved by ethanol. Of course, the oil companies denied it. Ethanol does share one property with methanol...It's hydroscopic. And probably the worst thing you can put in your fuel tank is water. Small engines have been getting ruined by ethanol, things like weed eaters, and lawn mowers. Some of the experts claim that marine fueling stations don't have ethanol, but their fuel comes out of the same refinery and bulk tanks as automotive fuel. You can buy non ethanol gasoline, but it's expensive, and hard to find. I noticed cans of it for sale in a local hardware store....But, I have no intention to pay something like $8-$10 a gallon for it. If I had a car that had a problem with ethanol in the gas, I'd look up on the internet how to remove ethanol from the gas. I'm sure there are thousands of guys who have figured it out by now.

cameron
07-19-2014, 11:47 AM
I haven't seen significant corrosion of brass in ethanol gasoline, not even the very fine brass mesh screen filter in some small engine tanks . Are you sure the float is brass and not anodized or plated aluminum?

RichR
07-19-2014, 12:29 PM
Is that the original float? Maybe it just wore out after 40 years of sloshing gas abrading the surface. This one looks awfully similar:
http://www.mossmotors.com/Shop/ViewProducts.aspx?PlateIndexID=108827
If you can't find an OEM replacement, maybe call their tech support line and ask what the dimensions are.

George Seal
07-19-2014, 01:51 PM
Guys
This looks like it could be electrolis to me. Very MINOR current flowing over a LONG period of time

Just saying

Black_Moons
07-19-2014, 02:13 PM
Ewwww. Never seen brass corrode that badly! Seen it get stress cracks after trying to fix the damn thing sure but never corrode that badly.

I'm going to agree with George, its likely electrolysis. Maybe you should put some plastic in between the steel rod and brass float? Sadly don't know of many thin plastics that would survive.

The only other thing I can think of, is chlorine. Any chance that road salts made it into a hole in the gas tank? Or maybe where washed into the gas tank of the gas station you use? (I always wonder why they put those filling hoses underground, Doesn't dirt and debris fall in every time they open it? Can only imagine what happens when they open it when its pouring out and the parking lot is under 1/2" of water.)

I seem to recall that most grades of brass/bronze don't really like salts. Hence why they have Aluminium brass and Admiralty brass and all those other brass alloys for salt water service.


Then again after 40 years maybe its just due for a new $12 float. I have some damage in a 27 year old float that has been siting in a lawnmower carb all that time.. (Pinholes from wear + stress cracks when I repaired it)

winchman
07-19-2014, 02:14 PM
"Ethanol and ethanol blends conduct electricity. Gasoline, by contrast, is an electrical insulator."

Ironically, that's from the Iowa Renewable Fuels Association. http://www.iowarfa.org/documents/MSdnr.pdf

atty
07-19-2014, 02:42 PM
If I had a car that had a problem with ethanol in the gas, I'd look up on the internet how to remove ethanol from the gas. I'm sure there are thousands of guys who have figured it out by now.

It's actually a simple process, but a bit aggravating when you consider what you have to go through just because of the politics involved in the whole thing.

Anyway, take a gallon of gas and add a quart of water. Shake it up and let it sit. The ethanol binds to the water and settles to the bottom. Siphon off everything above the line and you have pure gas, or as I have said before, just get your hands on some aviation gas. It's 100 octane, and no alcohol. Plus, it can sit a long, long time in your tank. No need for stabilizers.

I find it amusing that all the responsible parties deny problems with ethanol, but you won't find it in planes. Guess there's a substantial difference between pulling over to the side of the road and falling out of the sky.

Mike Folks
07-19-2014, 04:37 PM
Ethanol in today’s Gasoline

Today's gasoline(for the most part)contains Ethanol, not friendly to carb parts(floats, jets, and rubber fittings, including diaphrams on the CV carbs, and the vacuum operated petcock). Read this:

Ethanol In Gasoline Problems (E-10, E-15, E-20, E-30, & E-85)

Certain materials commonly used with gasoline may be incompatible with high-level ethanol blends, causing them to degrade and contaminate the fuel. Metals that have been shown to degrade over time in the presence of high-level alcohol blends include brass,(floats & jets) lead, zinc(carb bodies) and lead-based solder.

Nonmetallic materials that degrade when in contact with ethanol include natural rubber, polyurethane, cork gasket material, leather, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) polyamides, and certain thermoplastic or thermoset polymers.

On the other hand, unplated steel, nickel-plated steel, stainless steel, black iron and bronze have shown resistance to ethanol corrosion, with nonmetallic materials like reinforced fiberglass, Buna-N, Neoprene rubber, polypropylene, nitrile rubber, Viton and Teflon meeting acceptable usage standards with E85.

1. Ethanol can break down resins and fillers in fiberglass gas tanks, causing them to leak.

2. Resins leached from fiberglass tanks can go through the fuel system, sticking to valves and other internal engine parts.

3.These deposits have caused bent pushrods and have clogged intake valves.

4.The alcohol attracts water, leading to increased corrosion in metal gas tanks.

5.Water in the fuel affects the octane and leads to knocking and decreased performance.

6.Ethanol acts as an efficient solvent, gradually cleaning out the accumulated gunk in fuel tanks and lines, and clogging carburetors.

7. Certain rubber gaskets and fuel lines are weakened by ethanol. Some rubber fuel lines may develop internal swelling, restricting the flow of gasoline. My understanding is the Silicone fuel lines resist the effects of Ethanol in gas.

8. The Ethanol in the gas has been reported to attack the glue used in gas filters, rendering them useless, as the paper filter medium is now coated with glue. It also softened the filter hose connection ends, causing possible failure.

big job
07-19-2014, 05:22 PM
I have to speak...... this gas is ****/ junk/ repalce normal hoses, or within six months its stiff as a board.. Yes the floats
dont like it --your better off with cork instead of brass. and yes I have a stable of Lincolns and I just went through all of
the crap with Obama gas junk junk. I want to go home! somehow I beamed into a twin dimention or I drank to much
Jack, I dont know but, I know- I dont come frome here....I was born and brought up in a "filling station" Atlantic and I tell
ya the Hi Arc back then for .020Cents smelled so good ya want to drink it ( it was purple) Oh yeh "White Flashe" too reg.
Capitol oil Aviation, Supereme . samuel d.

topct
07-19-2014, 05:30 PM
Dad would pull up to the pump at the local Shell station. When the pump jockey started filling the tank it seems I could not get enough of the smell.

So true.:D

Real 110 octane. Chevron White pump. Gotta have it. You could feel the difference in a flat head Ford.

The new gas? I cannot have it on me or around me. The smell has this poison stench to it. Neither one is good for us. Just saying I remember that smell.

JoeLee
07-19-2014, 05:36 PM
I haven't seen significant corrosion of brass in ethanol gasoline, not even the very fine brass mesh screen filter in some small engine tanks . Are you sure the float is brass and not anodized or plated aluminum?Yes the float is brass, I did the file test just to make sure, it's not aluminum. There are a lot of reproduction floats out there still made of brass that look the same.
There may be a slight voltage present since the sending unit receives a 5 or 6 volt pulse and the rheostat is always submerged so I'm inclined to go along with the voltage present theory that George mentioned. There is also a galvanic reaction that can occur between two dissimilar metals, one the float being brass and the arm being steel or zinc plated steel and you can see that the part of the float that is missing is the part where it's clipped to the arm. The inside of the tank is spotless. But then again this has been sitting in gas for 40 years.

JL................

Black_Moons
07-19-2014, 09:38 PM
Dad would pull up to the pump at the local Shell station. When the pump jockey started filling the tank it seems I could not get enough of the smell.
So true.:D
Real 110 octane. Chevron White pump. Gotta have it. You could feel the difference in a flat head Ford.
The new gas? I cannot have it on me or around me. The smell has this poison stench to it. Neither one is good for us. Just saying I remember that smell.

I noticed this myself, My brother bought some unknown cheap ethanol gas for his lawnmower. It stings like hell when it gets on my hands and reeks.

the 0% ethanol at the chevron smells much less and does not sting if you get some on you.

FETOAU
07-19-2014, 09:49 PM
I have to agree that the mandated gas is pure **** and electrolysis is a strong possibility.

With regard to electrolysis, every item that I have observed that has been subject to electrolysis has looked like Swiss cheese

Today's gas is death on small 2 stroke engine fuel systems and carbs. I have been lucky until this year, but now have six small engine powered devices that need full carb replacements. These are all twenty plus years old and all commercial/industrial grade. Rebuilds, no longer work. And of course the 15-20$ carb is now well north of $100.00.

J Tiers
07-19-2014, 11:15 PM
Ethanol in today’s Gasoline
................................
Certain materials commonly used with gasoline may be incompatible with high-level ethanol blends, causing them to degrade and contaminate the fuel. Metals that have been shown to degrade over time in the presence of high-level alcohol blends include brass,(floats & jets) lead, zinc(carb bodies) and lead-based solder.

It is unlikely to be the alcohol itself, but more likely water with alcohol, or some other cause. I've had alcohol in contact with brass for long periods of time and never seen any attacking.

But acids and alkalies do have an effect.




4.The alcohol attracts water, leading to increased corrosion in metal gas tanks.

True



5.Water in the fuel affects the octane and leads to knocking and decreased performance.


FALSE AND RIDICULOUS...... water would be carbureted into the mixture. Water injection has been used for decades as a way of REDUCING knock and increasing power. The statement is claiming the reverse, clearly ignorant and silly.



6.Ethanol acts as an efficient solvent, gradually cleaning out the accumulated gunk in fuel tanks and lines, and clogging carburetors.

And what is GASOLINE? Chopped liver? It's a very good solvent. It's a different KIND of solvent, alcohol is a more polar solvent, and gas isn't.

Alcohol may well dissolve things that the gas lets drop out.
.....................................

And. of course.....to the person mentioning "Obama gas"? Really?

Like, you DO know there has been ethanol in gas since before Obama, right?

You DO know that the laws requiring it were passed in 2005 and 2007, WHILE BUSH WAS PRESIDENT and well before Obama took office, right?

But I forgot.... truth no longer matters.... it is only what is repeated and repeated that matters, it becomes the "new" truth....

A.K. Boomer
07-20-2014, 12:14 AM
Bravo JT, now that's a good post, could not agree more on so many levels... now see, that's why we keep you around... :-}

Willy
07-20-2014, 01:06 AM
5.Water in the fuel affects the octane and leads to knocking and decreased performance.




FALSE AND RIDICULOUS...... water would be carbureted into the mixture. Water injection has been used for decades as a way of REDUCING knock and increasing power. The statement is claiming the reverse, clearly ignorant and silly.
...


Mike's quote is actually correct.
Pure ethanol has a very high octane rating by itself and in E-10 blends it typically yields approximately 2.5-3 percent increase to the gasoline. When alcohol is allowed to absorb moisture to the point of saturation the remaining fuel's octane rating will go down from an acceptable 87 octane rating to a sub standard 84-84.5 octane level.
After the fuel is allowed to absorb even more water it will enter a phase separation point at which time the alcohol/water cocktail will settle to the bottom of the tank. This fuel will be picked up by the fuel pump pickup, the sump of which is always at the bottom of the tank. This phase separated water/ethanol blend will cause drivability issues and fuel system problems.

Comparing an ethanol/water blend to water injection systems is wrong. Water injection systems are an all together different approach in both concept and execution.

boslab
07-20-2014, 04:12 AM
I suppose there is brass and then there is brass if you know what i mean, there are so many different ones, don't know if dezincification could happen as i have no idea if zinc is soluble in any of the fractions in the fuel, water can take the zinc out of fittings so they use DZP fittings over here, ( dezincification protected) how or what alloy they are i don't know, perhaps the same could be true of fuel oil?
I haven't seen much internal pipe corrosion with oils though, just water
Mark

boslab
07-20-2014, 04:15 AM
Mike's quote is actually correct.
Pure ethanol has a very high octane rating by itself and in E-10 blends it typically yields approximately 2.5-3 percent increase to the gasoline. When alcohol is allowed to absorb moisture to the point of saturation the remaining fuel's octane rating will go down from an acceptable 87 octane rating to a sub standard 84-84.5 octane level.
After the fuel is allowed to absorb even more water it will enter a phase separation point at which time the alcohol/water cocktail will settle to the bottom of the tank. This fuel will be picked up by the fuel pump pickup, the sump of which is always at the bottom of the tank. This phase separated water/ethanol blend will cause drivability issues and fuel system problems.

Comparing an ethanol/water blend to water injection systems is wrong. Water injection systems are an all together different approach in both concept and execution.
Isn't there a system of water injection to cool the cylinders of racing cars? I thought i read something about it, prevents preignition aka knock?
Mark

J. Randall
07-20-2014, 05:34 AM
Mike's quote is actually correct.
Pure ethanol has a very high octane rating by itself and in E-10 blends it typically yields approximately 2.5-3 percent increase to the gasoline. When alcohol is allowed to absorb moisture to the point of saturation the remaining fuel's octane rating will go down from an acceptable 87 octane rating to a sub standard 84-84.5 octane level.
After the fuel is allowed to absorb even more water it will enter a phase separation point at which time the alcohol/water cocktail will settle to the bottom of the tank. This fuel will be picked up by the fuel pump pickup, the sump of which is always at the bottom of the tank. This phase separated water/ethanol blend will cause drivability issues and fuel system problems.

Comparing an ethanol/water blend to water injection systems is wrong. Water injection systems are an all together different approach in both concept and execution.

Totally agree, another statement J. made is off track also, the mixture will not be carbureted, drops of water don't go through a carburetor , they set in every jet and orifice and the bottom of the float bowl, until you clean them out.
James

JoeLee
07-20-2014, 07:43 AM
I noticed this myself, My brother bought some unknown cheap ethanol gas for his lawnmower. It stings like hell when it gets on my hands and reeks.

the 0% ethanol at the chevron smells much less and does not sting if you get some on you. Your right the stuff does reek and you can't get the smell off your hands no matter how many times you was them.
When I was a kid gas had an almost orange tint to it and a nice smell, one you could tolerate all day long.

JL...............

J Tiers
07-20-2014, 09:48 AM
Totally agree, another statement J. made is off track also, the mixture will not be carbureted, drops of water don't go through a carburetor , they set in every jet and orifice and the bottom of the float bowl, until you clean them out.
James

It seems to go through the main jet just fine...... it pulls from near the bottom on several of my machines.... And I've had quite a bit go through on the vehicles

As for the knock..... there may be a range of no help, but ...

I once had a load of fuel that was seriously waterlogged.... I had to floor it to get any acceleration, and got about 9 mpg on a 27 mpg car.

One thing it NEVER did do on that load was knock, and that car was known for knocking on regular fuels if you got heavy on the accelerator.

So.... your points may be slightly right, but not 100%, and I have seen the exact reverse of your statements.

boslab
07-20-2014, 10:15 AM
Totally agree, another statement J. made is off track also, the mixture will not be carbureted, drops of water don't go through a carburetor , they set in every jet and orifice and the bottom of the float bowl, until you clean them out.
James
Frozen carbs are common when water gets in the tanks of filling stations, the tanks get dipped regularly with copper sulphate paste on the end of the dip pole to see how low the tank can be pushed before water gets sucked up, the AA, aka automobile assoc used to love the filling station i spent a while at years ago, broken down cars about a 1/2 mile up the road!
Mark

SteveF
07-20-2014, 01:28 PM
.....
Anyway, take a gallon of gas and add a quart of water. Shake it up and let it sit. The ethanol binds to the water and settles to the bottom. Siphon off everything above the line and you have pure gas,

"Pure gas" with an octane level below engine manufacturer's minimum level since you removed the ethanol which raised the octane.



or as I have said before, just get your hands on some aviation gas. It's 100 octane, and no alcohol. ...............



Don't forget it's the last of the leaded gasolines in use. Don't know about you but i'm really not interested in finding out what lead does to all the expensive sensors in my vehicles.



I find it amusing that all the responsible parties deny problems with ethanol, but you won't find it in planes. Guess there's a substantial difference between pulling over to the side of the road and falling out of the sky.

Um, no, there is a substantial difference when the FAA mandates what fuel can be used in certificated aircraft engines and has been moving on a lead free replacement with all the urgency of a bear stuck in a dumpster full of food. General aviation aircraft also tend to sit for weeks at a time where the ethanol would absorb water into openly vented tanks and cause problems.

Steve

J. Randall
07-21-2014, 12:03 AM
Frozen carbs are common when water gets in the tanks of filling stations, the tanks get dipped regularly with copper sulphate paste on the end of the dip pole to see how low the tank can be pushed before water gets sucked up, the AA, aka automobile assoc used to love the filling station i spent a while at years ago, broken down cars about a 1/2 mile up the road!
Mark

I have found frozen gas lines under the car from that cause, where they were exposed to ambient temperature. Never found any that made it to the carb in those conditions. Have used a product like you describe to dip tanks called color cut. Never got curious enough to see what it was made from that caused the color change.
James

Black_Moons
07-21-2014, 01:33 AM
After the fuel is allowed to absorb even more water it will enter a phase separation point at which time the alcohol/water cocktail will settle to the bottom of the tank. This fuel will be picked up by the fuel pump pickup, the sump of which is always at the bottom of the tank. This phase separated water/ethanol blend will cause drivability issues and fuel system problems.

Comparing an ethanol/water blend to water injection systems is wrong. Water injection systems are an all together different approach in both concept and execution.

Id wager the problem is that injecting fuel+water through fuel injectors (or carb) = your ECU computer goes crazy wondering why the exhaust gas suddenly goes lean as there is very little fuel in your 'fuel', only for it to go back to normal as the water/gas line sloshes around in your tank at the pickup point, so that even if it can compensate, its just going to cause the engine to go extra rich a few seconds later if it compensates.

With a proper water injection system, I would assume the water injectors are separate and hence don't confuse your ECU by diluting the fuel to be precisely injected by the fuel injectors.

Black_Moons
07-21-2014, 01:40 AM
I find it amusing that all the responsible parties deny problems with ethanol, but you won't find it in planes. Guess there's a substantial difference between pulling over to the side of the road and falling out of the sky.
Don't forget it's the last of the leaded gasolines in use. Don't know about you but i'm really not interested in finding out what lead does to all the expensive sensors in my vehicles.
Um, no, there is a substantial difference when the FAA mandates what fuel can be used in certificated aircraft engines and has been moving on a lead free replacement with all the urgency of a bear stuck in a dumpster full of food. General aviation aircraft also tend to sit for weeks at a time where the ethanol would absorb water into openly vented tanks and cause problems.
Steve

Many aircraft still use magnetos and points. Two of them because ya know, they can't be trusted to be 100% reliable. Should we move back to magnetos too? Good luck keeping it simple and reliable once you add in timing advance.

Aircraft design is a real stick in the mud industry. If it was not for wars we would likely still all be in biplanes powered by the same engine the wright brothers first used 'Because it had a good track record (as the only engine ever used in an aircraft)'

loose nut
07-21-2014, 05:12 PM
I don't know about brass but consuming large quantities will cause corrosion in your liver. Hic gurgle gurgle:o

J. Randall
07-22-2014, 12:17 AM
It seems to go through the main jet just fine...... it pulls from near the bottom on several of my machines.... And I've had quite a bit go through on the vehicles

As for the knock..... there may be a range of no help, but ...

I once had a load of fuel that was seriously waterlogged.... I had to floor it to get any acceleration, and got about 9 mpg on a 27 mpg car.

One thing it NEVER did do on that load was knock, and that car was known for knocking on regular fuels if you got heavy on the accelerator.

So.... your points may be slightly right, but not 100%, and I have seen the exact reverse of your statements.

I remember that thread, but I was thinking you had a vehicle with EFI, and not a carburetor. I could be wrong though, to lazy to go back and look it up. With fuel injection an ethanol that had combined with all the water it could hold, I can kind of see that happening.



As far as your other machines, if you are talking about small engines I still say they will tolerate very little water. I never claimed 100 percent, but right as a general rule. If you can make a carb flow water, you better get a patent on it.
James

lakeside53
07-22-2014, 01:30 AM
Carbs on small chainsaws and weed eaters will stop with water in them. The small jets simply won't pass water - the surface tension is too high for the small vacuum to overcome.

cameron
07-22-2014, 08:15 AM
Some of the other old f.. codgers on this forum who are so down on ethanol seem to forget that, long before ethanol was put in gasoline, we had good gas and bad gas, we had gas with water in it, and old gas in a tank or a carburetor was always bad news.

What we mostly have now is bad gas, by yesteryears' standards, and some of it is only made tolerable by the ethanol in it.

Another factor not considered is that in the old days, it took a long time for gas to sit for six months in the fuel tank, nowadays, six months is gone in no time.

J Tiers
07-22-2014, 08:28 AM
On the shredder, the 6HP motor has a main jet that is pretty large, pretty short and simple. Straight from the bottom of the carb to the venturi, with a fairly large ID. It seems to pass water fine, at least it will burn gas that gives trouble to other smaller machines, no doubt partly due to the fact that it doesn't idle much, it gets run harder, and is usually into the main jet.

If you have so much water that it is sitting in a big pool in the bottom of the tank, there may be an issue. Water doesn't burn, since it is oxidized hydrogen... already burned. If a slug of it goes through , the engine will stall.

The truck has EFI, and when getting rid of bad (stale) gas by adding it to the truck, I have seen the thing stagger a few times when it may have gotten a slug of pure water through.

The idle jets on most all the small engines are too small, they will not pass water. The main jets are a different story and many will. A couple with tiny complicated carbs don't.

Then also, I don't believe water will magically get through the fine tank screen, get through the fuel filter, and then drop out in the carb to pool up.... The only way for that to happen is to have the gas evaporate and leave the water in place.

What? You don't have fuel filters on your small engines?

Then don't come crying to me about stopped-up carbs.....

J. Randall
07-23-2014, 12:15 AM
On the shredder, the 6HP motor has a main jet that is pretty large, pretty short and simple. Straight from the bottom of the carb to the venturi, with a fairly large ID. It seems to pass water fine, at least it will burn gas that gives trouble to other smaller machines, no doubt partly due to the fact that it doesn't idle much, it gets run harder, and is usually into the main jet.

If you have so much water that it is sitting in a big pool in the bottom of the tank, there may be an issue. Water doesn't burn, since it is oxidized hydrogen... already burned. If a slug of it goes through , the engine will stall.

The truck has EFI, and when getting rid of bad (stale) gas by adding it to the truck, I have seen the thing stagger a few times when it may have gotten a slug of pure water through.

The idle jets on most all the small engines are too small, they will not pass water. The main jets are a different story and many will. A couple with tiny complicated carbs don't.

Then also, I don't believe water will magically get through the fine tank screen, get through the fuel filter, and then drop out in the carb to pool up.... The only way for that to happen is to have the gas evaporate and leave the water in place.

What? You don't have fuel filters on your small engines?

Then don't come crying to me about stopped-up carbs.....

So you are telling me that your big jetted carbs burn water just fine, but you have fuel filters on everthing that keeps water from getting there. I can tell you for a fact that small engines a lot bigger than your 6hp with bigger jets won't suck it through, it will stay in the jet.Sure you might stumble and choke it along at full throttle for a bit, but you are not going to pull free water through the main jets on a carb. Fuel injection is different, you can pump some contaminated fuel through. I totally agree on using filters, and I try to use clean fuel myself. I have fixed a lot of other peoples self inflicted problems though.
James