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View Full Version : Don't throw your old screwdrivers away!



Tony
07-27-2014, 03:38 PM
Have a screwdriver that's opened one too many cans?

Too much paint/goop/epoxy built up over the years and you can't tell if its flat head or phillips?

Is it not chiseling metal/mortar/brick the way it used to?

Not to worry, there is hope:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3izKY78tgM

MotorradMike
07-27-2014, 03:50 PM
Nice!

Is there a grinding wheel that restores burnt exhaust valves?

MaxHeadRoom
07-27-2014, 03:51 PM
That is pretty much the only use now, who buys slot head screws, as a matter of choice? :p
Max.

Doozer
07-27-2014, 04:01 PM
What is this...April fools day or what???

-D

Toolguy
07-27-2014, 04:17 PM
In the video they are rounding it off more than giving it a correct square end. Also, when you talk about "sharpening a screwdriver" without a proper explanation probably half the audience thinks you are making it like a chisel.

Paul Alciatore
07-27-2014, 05:52 PM
I totally agree. They aren't sharpening it; they are dulling it. I like my Dremel tools, but not for this.

I would suggest that a flat file is a much better tool to sharpen a straight blade screwdriver. And I would grip it on the shaft, much closer to the tip while doing it. Their set up is just asking for vibration and if using the abrasive wheel in the Dremel, a broken wheel with fragments flying everywhere.

OH, and what about safety goggles? That would be the first item on my list of equipment, but on theirs it is totally absent.

That video is SOooo wrong an so many points.




In the video they are rounding it off more than giving it a correct square end. Also, when you talk about "sharpening a screwdriver" without a proper explanation probably half the audience thinks you are making it like a chisel.

becksmachine
07-27-2014, 09:02 PM
Not to mention that they are making the scratches go the wrong way.

Dave

Arcane
07-27-2014, 09:18 PM
I don't have to reshape flat blade screwdrivers very often but when I do I like to use a wet grinding wheel to reshape the tip so that the sides are parallel and then I use a file to dress the tip flat and at right angles to the sides taking care to retain the sharp edge.

mickeyf
07-28-2014, 12:16 AM
What? People throw things away? Ever?

PStechPaul
07-28-2014, 03:31 AM
I was surprised that this was an "official" Dremel video. The technique I was taught was to lay the flat high up on a full size grinding wheel so that there is a concave surface on each side, and parallel at the tip. Then the tip and sides can be dressed so that the edges are sharp and square. Then it's good to take some of the sharp edge off, but it should be fairly sharp so that it will be less likely to slip.

I wonder if anyone has made a non-slip "Yankee" screwdriver with a small notch or hole in the center of the tip, and then a small hole in the center of the screw slot. A small piece of drill rod or wire could be inserted and it would give perfect centering and no chance of slipping. The piece could be left in the slot to make it tamper proof.

MrFluffy
07-28-2014, 06:56 AM
I was surprised that this was an "official" Dremel video. The technique I was taught was to lay the flat high up on a full size grinding wheel so that there is a concave surface on each side, and parallel at the tip. Then the tip and sides can be dressed so that the edges are sharp and square. Then it's good to take some of the sharp edge off, but it should be fairly sharp so that it will be less likely to slip.

I wonder if anyone has made a non-slip "Yankee" screwdriver with a small notch or hole in the center of the tip, and then a small hole in the center of the screw slot. A small piece of drill rod or wire could be inserted and it would give perfect centering and no chance of slipping. The piece could be left in the slot to make it tamper proof.

They exist already. I have a screwdriver set for a variety of anti tamper screws, and various bits such as you describe is in there.

I keep my old screwdrivers ready for when someone comes asking to borrow one. Especially my wife...

boaterri
07-28-2014, 07:38 AM
And when your screwdrivers get beyond sharpening, heat the tip, pound it flat, bend to a 45* angle, notch the tip and retemper. You get a tack lifter!

Rick

justanengineer
07-28-2014, 08:11 AM
When my screwdrivers get old or buggered up, I just take them to either the local tool truck or Sears. I see no need to dink around trying to fix junk unnecessarily when Ive got plenty of junk I gotta fix out of necessity.

Ridgerunner
07-28-2014, 08:21 AM
I was taught that things like screwdrivers and planer blades were to be hollow ground and things like cold chisels were straight ground.

Tony Ennis
07-28-2014, 08:55 AM
I've never worn a screwdriver out unless it was a made from cheese-metal. And those, I would not spend time repairing.

vpt
07-28-2014, 09:05 AM
When I was in school we would hammer the end flat and then grind the sides to make a screw driver tip.

dian
07-28-2014, 10:36 AM
so does a file cut a screwdriver tip. no, i dont want to try.

stevehgraham
07-28-2014, 11:28 AM
This is like the idiotic Bobby Flay Food Network recipe that says to cook prime rib at 325. It says more about the need to put up content than the desire to give people advice that works.

A.K. Boomer
07-28-2014, 12:16 PM
so does a file cut a screwdriver tip. no, i dont want to try.

It does most, it's what I use. and does a very nice job.

you have to keep track of your unit pressures and go long ways across the for the final blade end procedure, then you won't damage the file teeth...

Old Hat
07-28-2014, 12:45 PM
I was taught that things like screwdrivers and planer blades were to be hollow ground and things like cold chisels were straight ground.

It's correct to the extent, that a very slight curve helps to prevent
the tendency of the screwdiver to wedge-up out of the slot.

Naturally if you over do it, that's not helpfull either
have~ing weakened it, just at the point where a little
rigidity makes the difference.

A.K. Boomer
07-28-2014, 01:07 PM
yes iv made drivers like that with a slight angle and it works great,

but iv also found just by filing directly across the two faces that the "grain" that I create has some pretty good holding power in itself --- esp. if the screw driver was a typical "craftsman" and had the grain running lengthwise... big change.

ironmonger
07-28-2014, 01:54 PM
Although doing this free hand is a trial, the profile that is present on gunsmith style screwdrivers is closer to that which would be created using the Dremel grinding bit shown than you would get using a file or a large wheel.

see drawing 6:
http://www.forsterproducts.com/store.asp?pid=24836

The big shovel-like end of a typical screwdriver has more to do with he manufacturing process than anything else. What would the possible use of the big wedge shape of a typical screwdriver have other than to carve slightly tapered holes in a recessed screw pocket?

The screwdrivers that you need to remove motorcycle idle jets, admittedly a thing of the past with fuel injection, need to be re-profiled to get down to the jet, and the blade had better be parallel where it fits into the jet if you want to get it out without mangling it. The small screws on control wire connectors for wiring VFD's need to be pretty narrow to keep form buggering the housing. et cetera ad nauseam...

Every blade other than number 6 depicted above is merely a steel donor for a proper screwdriver... either that or use it to make a brad puller or chisel as mentioned before... :cool:

paul