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paul
08-14-2014, 10:58 AM
I inherited this small horizontal band saw with no owner’s manual. Upon receiving the saw I cleaned it up and put fresh 90 weight gear oil in the gear box. The saw has been working fine for several years (light use). Now all the gear lube drained out past the drive wheel bearings.
Does anyone know what the proper lube is for this saw and how full to fill the gear box? I am thinking this gear box requires a light grease.

Make, Lynn
Model, BS45
Ser#, 1280

Thank you,

huntinguy
08-14-2014, 11:13 AM
Look up the 4x6 bandsaw on the grizzly tool website. You will see a downloadable manual. Most of the small saws are all the same.

Ohio Mike
08-14-2014, 06:03 PM
You need ISO-460 (SAE 140) gear lube. Two examples are Mobil SHC-634 synthetic or Mobilgear 600 XP 460. It will be about $25/quart.

Cuttings
08-14-2014, 06:35 PM
I have a 7" X 12" band saw similar to the one you have and just changed the oil in the gearbox.
I was quite a bit overdue as I bought the saw new a number of years ago. It all looked good and the original oil definitely smelled like gear oil.
I checked the manual and this is what it said.
The following lubricants may be used for the gear box.
- Atlantic Refinery Co. Mogul Cyl. oil
- Cities Service Optimus No. 6
- Gulf Refinery Co. Medium Gear Oil
- Pure Oil co. Park Clipper
All this did not mean much to me so because the original oil smelled & felt like about 90 gear oil that is what it got.
As for the oil level it doesn't really say, but when I took the lid off to clean out the old oil it was slightly above the lower rim which well covers all the gears.
I put approximate the same quantity back in. There is a vent plug in the lid, but filling it to that level would be too much.
I have had no trouble with oil leaking out. If I were you I think I would pull out the output shaft and have a look at the oil seal.
The parts list I have lists 3 ball bearings, a couple of O rings, an oil seal and a bushing along that shaft.

JoeLee
08-14-2014, 08:28 PM
I'm sure 90 wt. gear oil would be just fine.
As mentioned most all of those small cut off saws are copies of each other. My Wilton has a small plug on the gear box cover. I've never changed the oil and there are no signs of it leaking. My manual states that you fill it with the arm in the down position until the oil runs out of the plug hole.

JL.............

CarlByrns
08-15-2014, 08:16 AM
If the the gearbox has bronze gears, don't use anything with an EP rating- the additives with destroy bronze.

I use 600W, originally developed for Ford Model T axles. 600W is a trade name, not an SAE number.

It's very sticky (wear gloves!) and won't run out of poorly sealed gear drives. I use it in my 60 year old power hacksaw.

Eight bucks a quart right here: http://www.macsautoparts.com/ford_model_t/differential-oil-600w-quart-bottle.html

ahidley
08-15-2014, 01:40 PM
Carl byrns how did you find that out? That explains why so many people that I know have rebuilt the stripped out worm in their snowblower just to have it fail again and again. The gear shredded like it lost its strength and pealed apart. The last one that I took apart and had not failed, was a husqvarna and that had a white grease in it.. do you know what that grease is?

saltmine
08-15-2014, 03:44 PM
Sounds to me more like the bearings and seals are worn, My bandsaw uses regular 90wt and doesn't leak a drop....yet. I've had it and used it a lot for almost 8 years.

CarlByrns
08-15-2014, 04:54 PM
Carl byrns how did you find that out? That explains why so many people that I know have rebuilt the stripped out worm in their snowblower just to have it fail again and again. The gear shredded like it lost its strength and pealed apart. The last one that I took apart and had not failed, was a husqvarna and that had a white grease in it.. do you know what that grease is?

I read it somewhere (can't remember where) and the reason for a lot gear failure suddenly clicked . White grease is probably lithium grease.

velocette
08-15-2014, 06:41 PM
Hi as CarlByrns says use 600w oil in worm drives. As an engineer doing factory maintenance on the worm drive gearboxes 600w was always used.
The oil was supplied by "Mobil" and is a "Steam Cylinder Oil".
Specs @ http://www.mobil.com/Egypt-English/Lubes/PDS/GLEGENINDMOMobil_600W_Super_Cylinder_Oil.aspx
This gave excellent service and reliable running.
At $8 a quart this is answer to any worm drive gearbox lube.

Ohio Mike
08-15-2014, 11:01 PM
You need ISO-460 (SAE 140) gear lube. Two examples are Mobil SHC-634 synthetic or Mobilgear 600 XP 460. It will be about $25/quart.

The Jet manual (which mine is) specifically calls for MOBIL SHC 634. The Harbor Freight manual calls for SAE 140. Using anything lighter can cause leakage. There is a huge difference between 90wt and 140wt oil.

madmetric8x1
08-16-2014, 02:30 AM
If the the gearbox has bronze gears, don't use anything with an EP rating- the additives with destroy bronze.

I use 600W, originally developed for Ford Model T axles. 600W is a trade name, not an SAE number.

It's very sticky (wear gloves!) and won't run out of poorly sealed gear drives. I use it in my 60 year old power hacksaw.

Eight bucks a quart right here: http://www.macsautoparts.com/ford_model_t/differential-oil-600w-quart-bottle.html

That might work well. Or fix the leaking seal if it makes sticky all over the place. 90W and 140W gear oil had been mentioned. There are basically 2 kinds that you can find at a good automotive store, aside from various synthetic sorts. GL 5 (API spec.) is sometimes referred to as hypoid. GL 5 gear oil will wear out yellow metal (brass. bronze, copper) while GL 4 is specifically designed for it. O'Reileys auto parts has 140w in gallons for around $15. GL 4 can be hard to find.