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k2man
09-04-2014, 11:52 AM
I'm thinking I'd like to get a Bridgeport or similar vertical mill. If I find one nearby, what are my options on how to pick it up and get it home? I'm in Key Largo - looking in the south Florida area.


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Old Hat
09-04-2014, 11:58 AM
Don't lift it by the ram!
The spider inside takes the entire weight of the machine below the ram-turret.
added to the force of the four bolts pulling on the column.
"BS you'll here, it was made to be picked up by the ram, hence the threaded hole on top!"
I've replace a few spiders... Oh! how did that happen?
Transport with the knee about an inch from the bottom of it's travel.
Set it down easy. I've seen three cracked where the foot meets the column from being dropped
or put down hard toe-first.

boaterri
09-04-2014, 12:35 PM
I am not a rigger but this is now I did it (twice) Follow these steps at your own risk.

Bridgeports are really quite easy to move. Go to your local rental shop and rent the trailer that they use to move Bobcats or other small earthworking machines. Home depot/Lowes also has this type trailer. Gather up 3 or 4 pieces of black iron pipe 3/4" diameter. The kind used for pipe clamps or gas piping. A come-a-long or two and some heavy duty ratchet straps ( the yellow heavy duty ones, not the little red ones). One or more large pry bars or a Johnson bar. Some 2x or 4x wood blocking and nails

Invert the head of the Bridgeport to lower the center of gravity, put a 2x6 on the bed and slowly raise it until it is in firm contact with the head. Tip the bed of the trailer to the ground. Sweep the floor clean between the machine and the trailer. Use the pry bar to get the machine up on the pipes and slowly roll the machine to the trailer. Turns can be done by pivoting the machine on one pipe centered or by angling the pipes into a fan shape. Try and keep at least 2 pipes under the machine at a time when not turning. The come-a-long can pull the machine towards the trailer or restrain it if on a slight slope. Pull the machine on to the trailer with the final resting spot centered slightly forward of the axle. Secure a large block of wood between the front of the machine and the front of the trailer bed. Use at least 2 straps per side from high up on the Bridgeport to the corners of the trailer. I like to put a strap from the top straight aft to the center bottom of the bed if there is a good attachment point. Add blocking as you see fit.

Plan each step of the move carefully, be sure your help understands the plan and will follow it. Have an escape route away from the machine if it starts to go over. If the machine starts to go RUN!! DO NOT TRY TO SAVE IT OR THE WALL IT WILL SQUASH YOU LIKE A BUG!!!

Plan the work, work the plan and remember.......It's not rocket science, it's Egyptian science.


Good luck, work safe,

Rick

KJ1I
09-04-2014, 12:36 PM
Two choices:
1) Hire a rigger
2) Do it yourself

2 - Do it yourself - two choices:
1) Move it whole
2) Disassemble into (more) manageable pieces

Both 1 and 2 depend somewhat on the seller. Some sellers have a dock and/or fork lift available and will be happy to load onto your trailer or truck. Private sellers (non-businesses) will sometimes give you a hand, other times you're on your own. There are a number of videos on YouTube showing how others have transported mills and lathes. At your location, you will need a crane or gantry, so figure the cost of buying or renting one into your budget. Also take into account doorways, ceilings, etc., depending on the mill's final location.

Weston Bye
09-04-2014, 12:38 PM
If you have the luxury of being able to take it apart and make a few trips, it's no big deal.

I did it:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/40760-Bridgeport-home-worked-a-treat!

DR
09-04-2014, 12:41 PM
I'm thinking I'd like to get a Bridgeport or similar vertical mill. If I find one nearby, what are my options on how to pick it up and get it home? I'm in Key Largo - looking in the south Florida area.


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Have a rigger move it.

Top heavy machines like B'ports are not the easiest things to move.

For a recent move of a lathe (not top heavy) I rented an Home Depot truck (2000 pound capacity). Seller loaded machine. I had a local rental outfit deliver a forklift to the shop for unloading. Total cost was around $250, most of it being the forklift rental. For that 25 mile move a rigger would have been $450.

Having the forklift for a couple hours after unloading the lathe was nice. I shuffled a bunch of heavy things around while I had it.

Old Hat
09-04-2014, 12:44 PM
Study maritime rigging.
Any object should have a restraint-line secured opposite a point of potencial unintended movement.

Said line gets one or two turns around a post / beam / tree / what-ever.
A man is stationed, who's only task is to "take-up" or "feed-out" just enough slack.......
that a tippover or run-away is prevented by his takeing "a bite" on the lower turn
of the restraint-line.

k2man
09-04-2014, 01:06 PM
Very good information. I have moved things by rolling on pipes. It works well! I think I'll plan to do this. I know a guy with a bobcat, I'll see if he'll loan me the trailer. I totally understand "get the hell out of the way" if it starts to fall over. I've seen some "mentally challenged" individuals try some stupid stuff - amazing I haven't witnessed any deaths or dismemberments.

This mill I'm looking at is not in a good part of town, so if I buy it, I want to be prepared to pay and take it with me then.

Taking it apart sounds like a good idea, as it will be easier to load and unload in pieces. I have some dollies and come alongs, lots of ratchet straps and lots of 1" rope (for my boat), so I'll tie it down good.

I'll check out youtube videos - love youtube, lots of good info on about anything there. I even learned from a little girl some tricks to throwing a bait cast net on there!

Old Hat
09-04-2014, 01:12 PM
Very I have some dollies and come alongs, lots of ratchet straps and lots of 1" rope (for my boat), !

You own a boat big enough to have 1" rope? ROPE!
That's a landlubber's term Dude.

flylo
09-04-2014, 01:27 PM
Great ideas but I don't take them apart. If there is no forklift or other device I have a low trailer with a ramp, a pallet jack, a real shop crane that will lift it on a pallet or the trailer, plywood, a 7' railroad bar & jack, pipe, a forklift jack, toe jacks, hand winch and a helper. crane
Let me add 2 things use 2" trucker type straps & put an extra strap around the head or someplace high then to the rear of the trailer or around the trucks hitch if hauled in the bed in case some idiot makes you hit the brakes so it doesn't turn over forward. Go slow, think first, be careful.

justanengineer
09-04-2014, 01:53 PM
If its in the same town as you I'd suggest checking with the local towing companies. When my Bport needed moving from the rental to the bought home across town, $75 to a rollback operator got the job done quick and easy. Just make sure they use straps over the machine to tie it down good. Inverting the head and lowering the table also do wonders for keeping it upright when the operator "shakes" it off the truck bed.

Failing that, a 6' tanker's bar and 1" iron pipe for rollers are good to keep on hand. You'll be surprised how easy it is to push around on rollers. My other personal favorite is a pallet jack. Pry/lift an edge of the machine up, lag some 4x4's underneath, and its on its own semi-permanent pallet.

KiddZimaHater
09-04-2014, 01:56 PM
When I bought my mill, I just called a Towing company and requested a Flat-Bed tow truck.
The driver backed up to the mill, tilted the truck bed down to the ground, hooked up the winch, and pulled the mill onto the flatbed.
He strapped it down in about 8 different locations, drove it to my house, backed up to the garage, then reversed the process.
He even helped me roll it (on pipe) to the final location.
I paid the towing fee, and gave him a nice tip.
The towing fee isn't much more than renting a trailer, engine hoist, pallet jack, and your time.

gzig5
09-04-2014, 02:03 PM
Moving it on a concrete floor with pipes is very straight forward. It is sometimes easier if the machine is bolted to a pair of 4x4's with the tips angled. Lowboy tilting automotive trailers are pretty easy to get loaded without scary moments. I've also moved machines by hiring a flat bed car hauler that tilts down. They connect the winch cable low on the machine and the 4x4 skis allow it to be pulled right up. Above all else, use heavy duty load straps (2-3" wide) and use twice as many as you think are needed to keep the load from tilting forward under braking or sideways in a turn. Removing head or table makes it easier and lowers center of gravity but I've just lowered everything and blocked them up so the screw and nut aren't taking the shock from potholes.

Old Hat
09-04-2014, 02:16 PM
A complete novice should not attempt to take a machine appart
untill he's done it once, with someOne who knows what he's doing.

Too many understandable assumptions, too expect that one poorly thought out move
may mean it all goes to the scrappers.

flylo
09-04-2014, 02:19 PM
If you need to rent a trailer get a "drop deck" that drops the deck flat on the ground until loaded & secured & for unloading, no incline, no need to lift it onto the trailer.

RichR
09-04-2014, 03:24 PM
You own a boat big enough to have 1" rope? ROPE!
That's a landlubber's term Dude.

Actually it is rope until it is assigned a purpose, then it becomes a line, sheet, halyard, etc.

Royldean
09-04-2014, 03:34 PM
Actually it is rope until it is assigned a purpose, then it becomes a line, sheet, halyard, etc.

but the boat-shoe'd crowd (with their polo shirt collars flipped up) need that stupid "no ropes on a boat" saying to make themselves feel superior to us paupers....

bob308
09-04-2014, 06:56 PM
post number 3 has it right. i have moved a few that same way. another way is a rollback truck. instead of the trailer.

SGW
09-04-2014, 07:39 PM
There is (or was) at least one rope on a ship.

Billy Hill
09-04-2014, 07:58 PM
I had a freight trucker buddy move mine (Lagun FTV2S). He picked it up from my work by "walking" it out the back dock onto his semi then used a pallet jack to get it off the truck and into my garage. I used a pry bar to move it around the garage into place.

wierdscience
09-04-2014, 08:40 PM
Another vote for a Rollback wrecker.I have three trailers and haven't used them to move any machinery in a couple years.The local guy I use will run out,load,haul and unload door to door for $75-150 within a 20 mile radius and weights up to 8,000lbs.Plus he's insured,I'm not.

I plan ahead and have everything ready for him,all he has to do is load and drive.Bridgeports,lower the knee and invert the head and have it up to the door and ready to load when he gets there.Last move was a big hydraulic power unit,about 4x6 feet and 3,000lbs,took a total of 45 minutes to move the thing and all I had to do was write the check.

GillMcLane
09-04-2014, 08:48 PM
Here is how we did it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLD5_sm93zE

Gill

wierdscience
09-04-2014, 08:55 PM
Don't lift it by the ram!
The spider inside takes the entire weight of the machine below the ram-turret.
added to the force of the four bolts pulling on the column.
"BS you'll here, it was made to be picked up by the ram, hence the threaded hole on top!"
I've replace a few spiders... Oh! how did that happen?
Transport with the knee about an inch from the bottom of it's travel.
Set it down easy. I've seen three cracked where the foot meets the column from being dropped
or put down hard toe-first.

I've seen that too,but it wasn't due to lifting.It was caused by hack "machinists" over tightening the bolts with a cheater.:(

A 3/4 EM running full out in steel will generate greater forces on that spider than the weight of the machine,so if the spider and bolts have been stretched the machine is going to have problems no matter how it's rigged.

That said,I have seen the most damage done by forklift forks on all types of machinery.Worst was a Cream puff 40-42"ish Bullard VTL that slid off the forks and landed face first on the concrete.Knocked a big chunk out of the coolant skirt and cleaned a bunch of cast iron control levers off the front.A simple safety strap or chain or even a slip of cardboard between the forks and the base would have prevented it happening.

k2man
09-04-2014, 11:50 PM
Thanks everyone. Good suggestions - I don't think I'll try to disassemble it. I do have a pallet jack - I had forgotten about it - it is missing the stickers - don't know what weight it can handle. I'll have to find out cause that would be easier than pipe. I'll need to get some new straps - cant have too many.

My 1" rope I use for dock lines (yep, NOW they are lines :-) ) when I tie up across the canal for hurricanes. The boat is a 34' 1978 Silverton Sedan - I've rebuilt it and converted it from twin inboard 260hp to twin Mercury Optimax 225hp outboards. Fuel burn went from about .8 mpg to 1.4 mpg, top speed from 25mph to 35 mph. It was a lot of work, but I have a totally different running boat.


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Old Hat
09-05-2014, 03:13 AM
Actually it is rope until it is assigned a purpose, then it becomes a line, sheet, halyard, etc.

Don't I know it.... one of many childhood lectures.
But I couldn't resist, we got folks using welders and machine-tools that are reinventing the wheel
due to lack of and missinformation.

I was realy kinda fishing to see if the same goes on out on the water.
==========
halyard made sence .. .. .. hall / yard
but I never got a sr8 answer why sheet was chosen for a line that meters how far the sail
is let off the wind , or into the wind.

I could think of a few better terms .....

Old Hat
09-05-2014, 03:19 AM
but the boat-shoe'd crowd (with their polo shirt collars flipped up) need that stupid
"no ropes on a boat" saying to make themselves feel superior to us paupers....

One who can sail well dunt need to feel superior . . . .
He is . . . . superior,
even if he's penny-less he is rich, with-in.

If I couldn't be a Bar Man, I'd want to move to some place in need of a Boat, mechanic!
It's in my DNA .

Rustybolt
09-05-2014, 08:45 AM
I'll ad my .02.
When in doubt. Add another strap. Tighten those things until they play a high note. You want the machine to be part of the trailer.
I actually moved one in a Ford F250. Very, very slowly with W I D E turns.

Doozer
09-05-2014, 09:47 AM
Don't lift it by the ram!
The spider inside takes the entire weight of the machine below the ram-turret.
added to the force of the four bolts pulling on the column.
"BS you'll here, {hear?} it was made to be picked up by the ram, hence the threaded hole on top!"
I've replace a few spiders... Oh! how did that happen?
Transport with the knee about an inch from the bottom of it's travel.
Set it down easy. I've seen three cracked where the foot meets the column from being dropped
or put down hard toe-first.


I hear what you are saying, but you are drawing a conclusion based on a problem
that may or may not be present. To say never to lift a BP by the ram is like crying
wolf because you saw one once dead on the road.
I think the most pertinent advice is to check the spider bolts for being tight before
lifting it by the ram. To say never lift a BP by the ram is just trying to make one's
self look superior by offering a deduction based on their implied experience in said
matter. A given individual would look a whole lot more credible by offering tactful
root-cause based advice, instead of inventing their own rules of what to do or not do.
Begin at the beginning. Check the spider bolts before lifting by the ram. Simple.

--Doozer

EVguru
09-05-2014, 12:13 PM
Don't lift it by the ram!

"BS you'll here, it was made to be picked up by the ram, hence the threaded hole on top!"


Bridgeport certainly seem to think it can be lifted with an eye bolt, or with a sling under the ram. Those are the methods they show in the manual.

Now I can imagine how the spider could be broken when lifting if the turret wasn't seated properly, or the bolts weren't tightened evenly/properly.

Just because you see event C after event B, it doesn't follow that event B caused event C. There is often a previous event A that caused both B and C.

flylo
09-05-2014, 01:08 PM
I like to put them on a heavy skid with a thick plywood top & have lifted them by the ring or sling to position & bolt them to a pallet & never had a problem.

BigMike782
09-05-2014, 02:54 PM
I moved my Bridgeport with a 6-1/2' x 12' utility trailer and my F-150.
Forked on where I bought it, slide it down the trailer bed and onto the shop floor. From there it moved on 3/4 black pipe and rolled into place.
I rotated the head as far as I could,locked it in place and lowered the table as far as I could and locked in place.
I strapped it with 4 3" wide 3,333 WL straps, 2 around the base and 2 over the top of the ram.

The only issue I had moving it was the crazy old man that insisted I use these damned three wheeled skates. While moving one skate came out from under the base and about caused disaster........for me it either gets picked up with a fork lift or rolled on pipes.

danlb
09-05-2014, 04:54 PM
I'll ad my .02.
When in doubt. Add another strap. Tighten those things until they play a high note. You want the machine to be part of the trailer.
I actually moved one in a Ford F250. Very, very slowly with W I D E turns.

+1

Be careful of what you connect the straps to. The anchor point may need to support a good part of that 2000 lbs. Nailing a couple of 2x4s to the bed is a good idea to help keep the base from shifting.

My mill is a touch over 1000 lbs, and a retired trucker and his brother helped me move it. I knew there would be problems when the trucker tied the head to the wooden slats that ran the length of the fiberglass sides of the rental truck. I insisted that it be moved to the center of the truck and secured to the bed from all angles. We made the trip OK without destroying the shell of the truck and almost no damage to the mill.

BTW, NEVER hire a retired octogenarian trucker to move heavy objects. They may brag that they have forgotten more than I ever knew of the subject, but it's what they still remember that is important.

Dan

boslab
09-05-2014, 05:11 PM
I know ive written it before but its worth repeating, an accident i saw was a guy who had a 16 ton coil of steel being lowered bu a gantry crane, landed on a chock and started to tip, he put his hands against it and tried to right it, it was instinct, also it was not pretty, it flattened him completely, you can fill the details in yourself what happens, it was tragic and avoidable, if it moves, leave it, if it falls tough, you can get another mill, but only one life, be carefull with big heavy things.
Mark

Arcane
09-05-2014, 10:51 PM
Don't lift it by the ram!
The spider inside takes the entire weight of the machine below the ram-turret.
added to the force of the four bolts pulling on the column.
"BS you'll here, it was made to be picked up by the ram, hence the threaded hole on top!"
I've replace a few spiders... Oh! how did that happen?
Transport with the knee about an inch from the bottom of it's travel.
Set it down easy. I've seen three cracked where the foot meets the column from being dropped
or put down hard toe-first.

From http://www.bbssystem.com/manuals/bridgeport-manual.pdf

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0603/Arcane/Capture_zpsda185506.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Arcane/media/Capture_zpsda185506.jpg.html)

Billy Hill
09-06-2014, 10:46 AM
LMFAO...


Don't lift it by the ram!
...
"BS you'll here, it was made to be picked up by the ram, hence the threaded hole on top!"
From http://www.bbssystem.com/manuals/bridgeport-manual.pdf

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0603/Arcane/Capture_zpsda185506.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Arcane/media/Capture_zpsda185506.jpg.html)

...they even left the vise on for added emphasis. :cool:

Old Hat
09-06-2014, 05:16 PM
I hear what you are saying, but you are drawing a conclusion based on a problem
that may or may not be present. To say never to lift a BP by the ram is like crying
wolf because you saw one once dead on the road.
I think the most pertinent advice is to check the spider bolts for being tight before
lifting it by the ram. To say never lift a BP by the ram is just trying to make one's
self look superior by offering a deduction based on their implied experience in said
matter. A given individual would look a whole lot more credible by offering tactful
root-cause based advice, instead of inventing their own rules of what to do or not do.
Begin at the beginning. Check the spider bolts before lifting by the ram. Simple.

--Doozer

I don't know how I can possibly improve on this post!
Guy's always lift BridgePorts by the ram, it'll be fine .. .. .. Realy it will.

I donnow Doozer, I agread with you but still feel superior..... Sorry.:rolleyes:

astroracer
09-09-2014, 09:12 AM
May be old news now but this is how I moved mine...

Well, we got her home Thursday evening. Used a friends twin axle car tilt car trailer to haul it. Actually rolled the machine right up the ramps and onto the trailer with the pallet jack. Did the same when we got it home. It rolled right down the ramps and practically unloaded itself.
Here it is sitting in the shop Thursday evening.
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d623b3127ccef6900b65248c00000030O00BaNmrFmyYtQ e3nw0/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00501231564020140802211410218.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/
I can trundle it around all by myself. That pallet jack works very well!
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d623b3127ccef6909180242400000030O00BaNmrFmyYtQ e3nw0/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00501231564020140802211417629.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

Friday afternoon and Saturday were spent getting the machine placed and leveled and I also did a bit of wiring to replace the old brittle stuff.
This is her new home for a while.
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d623b3127ccef6910ab8c5b500000030O00BaNmrFmyYtQ e3nw0/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00501231564020140802211424862.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/
All leveled up and ready to go.
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d623b3127ccef6901d1424f600000030O00BaNmrFmyYtQ e3nw0/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00501231564020140802211431444.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

k2man
09-12-2014, 10:45 PM
Well, it was easier than I thought, thanks to a forklift. We lifted it by the ram, with wood between the forks and the ram. The Bridgeport manual shows using a strap or rope around the ram. We set it down on the smooth concrete floor, then 2 guys easily slid it six feet, spun it around and right into place.


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k2man
09-12-2014, 10:46 PM
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/13/yqu2yny7.jpghere it is in its new home. First I'll begin cleaning.


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flylo
09-12-2014, 11:09 PM
Glad it went well. A pallet jack lifts & moves 2.5 tons & you can get a great used one for under $100, one of the most handy tools you can have.

k2man
09-12-2014, 11:12 PM
I do have a pallet jack, left in my shop by the previous renter. I haven't used it in three years though. I have some lighter duty wood 4 wheel dollies that I do use occasionally. I'll keep the pallet jack though, never know when something heavy will need to be moved.


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Glug
09-12-2014, 11:15 PM
Congrats!

On that stuff about lifting with an eye bolt. After seeing one tear out of a mill, I will never lift a heavy machine with just an eye bolt. It was 5/8 or 3/4" and screwed fully into the designated lift point. The mill dropped a couple of inches on a flatbed truck. It could have been much worse, since it had been 5' up minutes before.

As a minimum, the eye bolt should have a backing nut. And a secondary safety chain wouldn't be a bad idea, especially if the eye bolt goes into something with any chance of failure (void in casting, bad weld, whatever).