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View Full Version : How REAL MEN built steam locomotives- Video



KiddZimaHater
09-06-2014, 12:19 PM
WOW!
I just came across this video of old-timers building a locomotive.
17 minute video.
Notice at the 2:30 mark, these guys pouring molten steel into a mold, WITHOUT ANY PROTECTIVE GEAR!
YIKES! I'm surprised their dress shirts and ties didn't burst into flames. :eek:
Building a Locomotive (http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=666_1409962173)

Fasttrack
09-06-2014, 03:42 PM
Thank you for sharing! I thought I had seen this one before, but I was mistaken. Very neat video.

boslab
09-06-2014, 04:15 PM
I remember casting ingots, so called bottle top moulds with a warehouse coat on, kind of kahki coloured lab coat, we did have cobalt blue glasses though, just to see the rimming action of the steel when dumping bags of ali in the mould, the lid was put on and a bar slid through eye bolts to hold it down, not enough ali and the steel used to squirt out the sides, lovely job, molten metal clothing didnt arrive for years, wool jackets and trousers, and clogs!
Archaic to say the least
Mark

burdickjp
09-06-2014, 04:25 PM
I would pay good money for the prints they show at around 30 seconds. I LOVE old prints like that.

Forrest Addy
09-06-2014, 05:34 PM
Note the cranks built into the center of the driver axles and the crankpins on the drivers. Four cranks. The engine had cylinders inboard and outboard of the drivers. I submit it was a double expansion engine, low pressure inboard and high pressure outboard. It's 30% more efficient than what we think of today as single expansion steam engine design of the era. 30% more power from the same steam at full trottle and the valve linkage to attain crisper admission cut-off would be simpler.

I've often wondered why they never used condensing engines: 30% more bang for the buck yet. Bulk for the LP cylinders? Size of the condenser? Complication? Serviceability. Cost of maintenence? Practicaility in a 10 ft wide by 18 ft high envelope on a 4 ft 8" track?

JRouche
09-06-2014, 06:40 PM
What a great video!!! Thanks... JR

PStechPaul
09-06-2014, 07:38 PM
Quite amazing. I've seen other similar videos, but this one may possibly be the best. I was also surprised at the lack of even basic safety equipment, particularly goggles in the close presence of flying hot metal. Probably one reason why things like this can no longer be made at reasonable cost is the extreme measures now required for safety, and even more so, the liability insurance and huge settlements that make lawyers rich, and almost encourage workers to get injured on the job so they can collect compensation and live on easy street the rest of their lives. This probably does not apply to China, and it gives them a huge edge in competition.

MaxHeadRoom
09-06-2014, 07:49 PM
I was also surprised at the lack of even basic safety equipment, particularly goggles in the close presence of flying hot metal.

And when an in-floor casting was made and the pour was made with a trace of moisture in the mold, = Mount Vesuvius!!
Max.

FETOAU
09-06-2014, 11:42 PM
The apparent simplicity of the labor intensive individual operations accentuate the ability of our craftsmen/artisan ancestors to perform complex tasks in an efficient and accurate manner. The current generation has no concept of the effort previously required to produce what they do now with just keystrokes.

Thanks for the video posting,

Fetoau

aostling
09-06-2014, 11:48 PM
... I've often wondered why they never used condensing engines: 30% more bang for the buck yet. Bulk for the LP cylinders? Size of the condenser? Complication? Serviceability. Cost of maintenence? Practicaility in a 10 ft wide by 18 ft high envelope on a 4 ft 8" track?

I think you have hit on it. An air-cooled condenser cannot be as compact as a water-cooled, and would require way too much frontal area.

J Tiers
09-07-2014, 12:04 AM
I would pay good money for the prints they show at around 30 seconds. I LOVE old prints like that.

Particularly with that man's signature........

KiddZimaHater
09-07-2014, 12:27 AM
I love the 'Schedule of Parts' book at :40 second mark
361 Pages.
That's a lot of parts to be scheduled ... Now get to Work!!!

Duffy
09-07-2014, 02:06 PM
Regarding condensing engines:- South African Railways ran "banjo head" engines across the Great Karoo because there was just no water available. These were condensing engines and whether they werre efficient or not did not really matter-nothing else would work.

outback
09-07-2014, 03:03 PM
Great video, Thanks Jim