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PT Doc
09-12-2014, 09:52 PM
I need to repaint a Kalamazoo 3hp 6x48" belt sander. I'm excited that this is a USA made grinder with a USA Baldor motor. The safety shields will be a black hammertone. I chose this simply because of ease of touching up when I bang things up. Not if but when. :)

The stand will be a dark machinery gray by Rustoleum. I think that it is gloss though. I want to paint the frame of the grinder a lighter gray since that is the way it was.

The Baldor motor will be a medium charcoal gray although Baldor has no cans of this exact paint in the country. I think they use 2 other gray motor paints so I will likely go with that.

Do you like flat satin or gloss when painting machinery?

I greatly appreciate your help. Thanks

Arthur.Marks
09-12-2014, 10:29 PM
Through trial of many paint types, I recommend oil-based paint in a can. It stands up better. For a visual texture similar to a spray can, cheap foam brushes or a small roller work well. The spray can paint is good, but really doesn't truly harden until a month or more. Use before that doesn't hold up very well. 2, nothing more.

Glug
09-12-2014, 10:55 PM
I used rattlecan hammertone from either krylon or rustoleum on a kennedy tool box. It looked good but it never wanted to harden. Not even after a month and a lot of quality time in the sun. You might want to do a test before you commit to it.

gambler
09-12-2014, 10:57 PM
Through trial of many paint types, I recommend oil-based paint in a can. It stands up better. For a visual texture similar to a spray can, cheap foam brushes or a small roller work well. The spray can paint is good, but really doesn't truly harden until a month or more. Use before that doesn't hold up very well. 2, nothing more.
I second this, wipe down the machine with mineral spirits before you paint. oil base enamel from a paint store, they can match any color chip.

Arthur.Marks
09-13-2014, 08:39 AM
Rereading the original post, I may have answered a question that wasn't posed? And skipped one that was. I always use a gloss finish.

jep24601
09-13-2014, 08:41 AM
Yes, it's amazing their color matching abilities. In larger cities Sherwin Williams will usually have one store for the commercial market with really knowledgeable staff.

GadgetBuilder
09-13-2014, 10:12 AM
About 3 years ago I used a spray can from ACE hardware of their Interior/Exterior Premium Enamel, machinery gray color, on the base of my old Rockwell drill press. They claim "Very Fast Drying" and it was dry to the touch quickly but took about a week for the enamel smell to go away - so I didn't use it during that time. It's glossy and has held up very well, better than any of the other spray cans I've tried.

John

KJ1I
09-13-2014, 11:09 AM
+1 for gloss, there is just something special about a bright shiny piece of "new" equipment.

I also like to use oil based enamel that has a hardener available.

radkins
09-13-2014, 02:21 PM
Rustoleum is just another way to spell garbage, it takes forever to dry and then it still does not really harden nor will it hold a gloss well at all. Basically it's just a cheap oil based coating that will remain soft till doomsday. What I use is implement acrylic enamel paint meant for farm tractors and such but with an added isocyanate based hardener, this hardener additive makes the paint dry faster and makes it extremely tough so it will not only hold it's gloss for years but it will take a beating before it chips. Even without the hardener this acrylic implement enamel is waaaaaay better than any of the hardware store varieties or anything from a rattle can, Valspar, Krylon industrial paints, Nason (by Dupont), etc are all good paints for this purpose.

If a hardener is used BEWARE of the hazards! This stuff can be dangerous but like anything else it is only as dangerous as the way it's handled will allow, don't spray or even brush it on in an enclosed area without lots of ventilation and don't spray it at all without some form of respiratory protection (which should be used regardless of what kind of paint is sprayed). It's not dangerous to use as long as a bit of common sense is applied but someone who might get away with spraying another type of paint in a manner that they shouldn't be doing anyway might find the iso-based stuff to be a lot less forgiving, no reason to be afraid of it just use common sense.

jlevie
09-13-2014, 03:07 PM
I hardly ever use rattle cans any more. A while back I replaced my siphon fed trim and full sized spray guns with gravity fed HVLP guns, which are way easier to clean and have little overspray. I'll use a rattle can occasionally on a small object for a one off of some color I'm unlikely to use again. But everything else gets painted with one of the HVLP guns. For larger things and machine tools I'll use a catalyzed urethane, which I can get mixed in any color I desire. For more general use I have a small selection of solvent based chassis and engine paints (from Eastwood) that I'll pick from, since they won't go bad like the urethane will when sitting on the shelf for a long time. The engine and chassis paints won't make as tough a film as the urethane, but they are much more rugged most anything you can get from a rattle can.

Whether I'm using a rattle can or one of the guns I always wear a mask with activated charcoal filters. And I keep a generous number of fresh filters on hand. If I get a hint of the smell of the paint, I change filters.

radkins
09-13-2014, 04:15 PM
Be warned when using activated carbon (commonly mis-called charcoal) filters for use with catalyzed (isocyanate hardeners) paints, those things are only acceptable for a very short time after removing from the package. Once they are exposed to the air and "activated" they should not be used for any dangerous fumes such as ISO containing paint spray after 24 hours, 3M recommends no more than 8 hours. After that time they are no longer safe for use and will become inactive even if not saturated, the factory rep warned us that the common method of storing these things in an air tight container is useless because once they are removed from their factory packaging and exposed to air they can not be stored for future use! If you are using them for ISOs and using them past the 24 hour active window you are taking a real chance on your health! If you are using them until you are getting even a hint of paint odor through them then you are definitely way past their useful life, this is exactly how most people get poisoned with ISOs according to the factory rep at an auto paint seminar I attended a few years ago. If you are spraying ANYTHING dangerous then those filters must be used within 24 hours (by some accounts only 8 hours) and then replaced no matter how they are stored! The effects of this stuff can be cumulative and the fact you may not have noticed any ill effects yet is in no way proof that you are not being poisoned, if you wait until symptoms appear then it's too late and you can be in for a world of hurt! Unexplained headache and nervousness is usually the first signs and at that point you will have incurred serious toxicity that may never completely go away, those filters are only about $15 to $20 a pair and are only a small cost in the overall cost of painting so does it really make sense to try and save them?

Rich Carlstedt
09-13-2014, 05:39 PM
Be aware that Gloss paints are harder than Flat Paints and Semigloss lies in between.
Always use gloss if you expect any wear against the painted surface.

While I use spray cans a great deal of the time, For machinery finishing, I like
enamels that come in quart cans . Primer (!) is a must for machine coatings
Rich

Black_Moons
09-13-2014, 06:04 PM
You can often get much better results from oil paints by baking them with 500W halogen lights. 12 hours under the light and lots of paints will harden enough to resist gasoline.

PT Doc
09-13-2014, 09:50 PM
I used the dark machinery gray Rustoleum and in my opinions is not dark at all. Ended up getting a different gray from Rustoleum, not professional, that will likely be the color that I want.

George Seal
09-14-2014, 08:58 AM
I have a discarded counter top oven that if the part fits it gets baked at 250 for an hour. Rattle can paint comes out hard and dry
Oven did not really need replacing just that SWMBO wanted a new one. Mother-in-law did the same thing now I have a spare

PT Doc
09-14-2014, 10:36 AM
I ended up getting 2 cans of Rustoleum charcoal gray # 7784 that I will use for the stand of this grinder. The professional dark machinery gray will stay on the frame. Those professional cans are pretty nice to use though.

MrSleepy
09-14-2014, 11:17 AM
Make sure you follow the instructions regarding 1 hr or 24hr recoats and add to that "wait 24hrs after sanding."

I have just resprayed the embossed text manufacturers badge on my lathe using Rustoleum red enamel and clear coat.



1st time round I sprayed the red enamel...waited 48hrs for it to dry....sanded it back to reveal the brass text then sprayed the clear coat.....Disaster...the whole lot crinkled. (like stripping it with methylene chloride).

Did some research...and found that you have to wait 24hrs again after sanding , as it removes the sealing layer between coats,allowing the thinners to get at the previous layers.


So 2nd time round I sprayed the red enamel...waited 48hrs for it to dry....sanded it back to reveal the brass text then wait 24hrs after sanding..sprayed the clear coat.....success...Looks lovely.

Rob

jlevie
09-14-2014, 11:41 AM
Be warned when using activated carbon (commonly mis-called charcoal) filters for use with catalyzed (isocyanate hardeners) paints, those things are only acceptable for a very short time after removing from the package. Once they are exposed to the air and "activated" they should not be used for any dangerous fumes such as ISO containing paint spray after 24 hours, 3M recommends no more than 8 hours. After that time they are no longer safe for use and will become inactive even if not saturated

You are totally correct and I should have mentioned that I always use fresh filters for a urethane spray job. Fresh filters aren't as critical for solvent based paints and you can use them until they saturate.

radkins
09-14-2014, 12:27 PM
After the maximum exposure period the filters will still remove particulate matter (such as overspray) but will allow some vapors to pass through, vapors from solvents such as lacquer thinner can pass even if the filter stops the microscopic droplets that form the overspray. Still as you point out with normal solvent based paints such as those based on mineral spirits and even lacquer/acrylic enamels the risk becomes minimal and filtering the overspay is usually good enough unless a person is doing this everyday on a regular basis, I suppose technically the painter would still be breathing toxic vapors but compared to using no protection at all (which is often done with these paints) it get's to be a classic case of "splitting hairs". With more dangerous products such as those containing ISOs (including catalyzed acrylic enamels or any paint with an added activator/hardener not just Urethane) and high concentrations of Methylene Chloride (paint strippers for example) expired filters could be a bit risky.


Methylene Chloride based paint strippers are a scary product considering how dangerous they can be and how often they are carelessly misused, unfortunately lots of folks tend to not bother reading the label warnings and very often don't take them seriously when they do but then I guess that's a topic for a different discussion.