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View Full Version : Value of Atlas machine tools.



MattMaier
09-13-2014, 09:23 PM
What is the value of an Atlas/Craftsman machine tool? I am interested in eventually having the lathe, horizontal mill and shaper, but if I could buy one right now I would probably go for either the mill or shaper as that is what I have space for right now. Machines would have to be in good condition and able to make cuts.

JRouche
09-13-2014, 09:31 PM
Hmmm? As with ALL things including gold and the stock market.

The value of an item is what someone is willing to pay. With machine tools location seems to play a large role in this due to availability.

Some folks will also pay more for less of a machine due to several reasons.

Atlas? Its all over the board. Pick a figure and it will align with another persons number eventually. Old machine tools dont hold ANY pricing lines. JR

k2man
09-13-2014, 09:51 PM
I bought a Craftsman Atlas lathe from a neighbor for $150. He found it at a garage sale for that price a while back- owner had died, widow sold it. It is in very good condition - some wear on the one way, but very useable. I got it for a steal - I've seen them on Craigslist for $1000.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

KJ1I
09-13-2014, 09:55 PM
JR has it right. One thing I have noticed is that an Atlas/Craftsman machine in my area (New England) typically sells for 50% to 66% of a comparable South Bend or Logan. But it also depends a lot on what comes with the machine. Lots of tooling can really boost the asking price of the machine -- and it is often worth the extra cost. You can usually figure spending about the same on tooling as you do on the machine.

dp
09-13-2014, 10:30 PM
I have a Craftsman Commercial lath that is based on Atlas technology, and an Atlas shaper. I like both very much and have gotten a lot done with both. I'm also looking for an Atlas horizontal mill and understand the limitations. If I stumble onto a similar mill in good condition I would not hesitate to buy it.

I paid $850 for the shaper, and $800 for the lathe. Both were common prices in the local region (Puget Sound).

J Tiers
09-13-2014, 10:35 PM
Oddly, Atlas often has a price here between Southbend (always high, known brand) and Logan etc (less known brand, lower prices) for similar sized machines. Atlas is a known brand also, and known brands get higher prices.

For hobby types, who are the only ones likely to choose and use Atlas these days, the price often goes up with the ability to get them into a basement easily. All Atlas fit that bill, and pricing on the mill and shaper are often astronomical on account of it. The 6" gets a price in general out of proportion to its usefulness, probably based on ease of moving, non-threatening size, etc.

But, yes, prices are all over. Location is a bit deal, in old manufacturing areas, prices are low, in machine deserts, they are high. Highest price for an Atlas 12" I have seen was $3000, lowest was "just get this dirty old thing out of here".

Mister ED
09-13-2014, 10:49 PM
Agree with all said. I would add in condition as well. And I'm not talking dirty grungy vs a fresh coat of paint.

And be prepared to 'search' for a time ... sooner or later you something will pop up that you think is a deal.

vpt
09-14-2014, 10:30 AM
Around by me the prices are all over the place. Most times though it seems atlas, logan, SB, are all about the same.

The biggest thing to look for in any machining machines is the tooling they come with. The tooling can easily cost as much if not more than the machine itself.

Tony Ennis
09-14-2014, 10:37 AM
For hobby types, who are the only ones likely to choose and use Atlas these days, the price often goes up with the ability to get them into a basement easily.

Guilty as charged! A beginner won't notice the luxury in this, the bang-for-the-mass performance, until he sees a tool room lathe and realizes what happens if he drops it down the steps - or onto himself. Moving machines is not for the unprepared or under-equipped.

Rich Carlstedt
09-14-2014, 11:07 AM
As with all things for sale, value ($) is with the buyer

As a general observation for the benefit of the poster. I have seen little change in the sales prices of Atlas tools in the last 20 years
They generally go from between 500 and 800 dollars.
Some are higher and some lower , but the trend has been flat
The 12 inch lathe is at the high side of the range

The 6 inch lathe is a different story, there are 3 versions
The older one with the small V ways going from 100 to 300 (and even 50 bucks)
The newer two have flat ways which are heavier see 200 to 400
Especially the square head Timken Bearing late model

Rich

You can be sure of one thing..someone else always gets a better price !

Ohio Mike
09-14-2014, 11:16 AM
What is the value of an Atlas/Craftsman machine tool? I am interested in eventually having the lathe, horizontal mill and shaper, but if I could buy one right now I would probably go for either the mill or shaper as that is what I have space for right now. Machines would have to be in good condition and able to make cuts.

Again, we can't even begin to tell you because you don't have a location in your profile. Are in New England, Midwest, South West, Florida? Prices of small Atlas size tools may be nearly twice a much in some regions compared to others.

J Tiers
09-14-2014, 03:51 PM
.............
The 6 inch lathe is a different story, there are 3 versions
The older one with the small V ways going from 100 to 300 (and even 50 bucks)
The newer two have flat ways which are heavier see 200 to 400
Especially the square head Timken Bearing late model...........

Rich


I think you are confusing the AA or 109 with Atlas, who never made it. As far as I know, EVERY Atlas ever made that is commonly found used, has flat ways.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsman/index.htm



It can be confusing unless you know, because the AA/109 was sold by Sears and even under the Craftsman name. (Also under Dunlap, though, which Atlas units never were that I know of)

Rich Carlstedt
09-14-2014, 04:07 PM
I think you are confusing the AA or 109 with Atlas, who never made it. As far as I know, EVERY Atlas ever made that is commonly found used, has flat ways.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsman/index.htm

It can be confusing unless you know, because the AA/109 was sold by Sears and even under the Craftsman name. (Also under Dunlap, though, which Atlas units never were that I know of)

Right you are Jerry, but the poster mentioned both Atlas and Craftsman, so I included the Dunlap Lathe
The poster should know that the Dunlap lathe had a small ( 5/8 " ?) Threaded Spindle nose, while the Atlas units had a 1" nose.

Rich

flylo
09-14-2014, 05:22 PM
Location Location Location, Then Condition Condition Condition & last but not least Tooling Tooling Tooling!

justanengineer
09-14-2014, 06:19 PM
JME, but Ive never bought machines for so little and sold them so high as I did with several Atlas machines.

J Tiers
09-14-2014, 08:04 PM
Right you are Jerry, but the poster mentioned both Atlas and Craftsman, so I included the Dunlap Lathe
The poster should know that the Dunlap lathe had a small ( 5/8 " ?) Threaded Spindle nose, while the Atlas units had a 1" nose.

Rich

They were both Craftsman AND Dunlap... And, they had two different spindle noses I have heard of. Both I know of were 1/2", but one was 20 and I believe the other one was 24 tpi. The very very last (and rare) one had a 1" spindle.

The crossfeeds on most were 24 tpi, leading to some rather "interesting" feeds per turn. No idea why a 20 tpi screw could not have been used.

JCHannum
09-14-2014, 09:17 PM
While Atlas made machine tools for Sears under the Craftsman name, not all Craftsman machine tools are the same as the corresponding Atlas machines. As far as I know, the milling machines and shapers were the same, just rebadged.

Lathes, however, varied quite a bit as Sears offered different levels of quality at different price points. There was a difference in materials and some major differences in some areas of design, particularly in the arrangement of the drives as well as the tumbler and banjo for the change gears. I have seen a Sears lathe with a Zamac casting compound slide (It might have been a Metalmaster, I don't recall) and Zamac used in other areas not seen on Atlas machines such as the graduated feed collars. Sears offered a 12" machine from the mid thirties on, while Atlas did not offer a 12" machine until the introduction of the upgraded lathe in the late 50's.

Tony's points out some of the differences starting with the Sears Metalmaster lathe;

http://www.lathes.co.uk/craftsman/index.html