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chrisinestes
10-02-2014, 02:26 PM
Another new guy here. Lots of new for me actually. I'm new to the forums, new to the magazine, new to metal working, and I just got a new (to me) metal lathe. It's a 1947 Wards Powr-Kraft (Logan). I'm working on getting it set up so I can make some chips.

By day I make custom wooden signs and tap handles in my own shop. I have a 4' X 8' CNC router table and a shop full of the normal wood working tools, so I'm not new to powered things that can hurt me... Still have all 10 fingers! I've got maybe 3 hours of supervised experience on a metal lathe, so I have lots of learning to do in that area.

What brought me here was the magazine. I was at an antique engine show a few years back, and I saw the coolest little gas engine I'd ever seen. Turns out it was a 1893 Henry Ford engine. I found out what it was, and that you could get plans, so I figured I better build one of my own. Somehow I came across an ad for the magazine saying it would have that engine build documented, so I subscribed, and here I am.

Anyway, I thought I'd introduce myself before I started in with my 1000 questions.

Chris

Stu
10-02-2014, 02:34 PM
Welcome Chris,

I think you'll find a lot of good information here, many experienced, talented (and opinionated) people here.

Stu

Bob Fisher
10-02-2014, 02:42 PM
Bring your questions on, Chris.the collective smarts on this board can answer it. Somebody here will know. Welcome to the forum. Bob.

Bob Ford
10-02-2014, 02:42 PM
Welcome,
There is a wealth of knowledge on this board. After you ask a question it is up to you to sort the best way for you to proceed.

Bob

bborr01
10-02-2014, 03:26 PM
Welcome to the forum Chris. Lots of knowledge here for the asking.

Brian

john hobdeclipe
10-02-2014, 04:29 PM
1000 questions, times 1000 answers to each one...we could be here all night.

alanganes
10-02-2014, 04:39 PM
1000 questions, times 1000 answers to each one...we could be here all night.

So true, but navigating the signal-to-noise ratio is half the fun of places like this.

:)

Welcome aboard, new guy. Endless things to learn here.

boslab
10-02-2014, 05:45 PM
Hello, hope your journey from here on is as interesting as mine has been!
Mark

loose nut
10-02-2014, 06:44 PM
Run away while you can, this hobby is a disease that has no cure.

boslab
10-02-2014, 07:02 PM
Your right, swarfpox chip pox rust fever to name a few, no known cure but symptoms can be alleviated with new machines, seems to be be about a Lb an hour of relief
Mark

RussZHC
10-02-2014, 08:56 PM
Welcome.


no known cure but symptoms can be alleviated with new machines, seems to be be about a Lb an hour of relief

How true :rolleyes:
You need a milling machine to go with that lathe, how about this one http://cosprings.craigslist.org/tls/4680860162.html, no connection

chrisinestes
10-03-2014, 01:59 PM
Thanks for all the welcomes! I don't have any specific questions yet, but I surely will. My weekend goal is to have it leveled and trued. I've got a particular job for it... it's super simple so it'll give me some time behind the cranks before I move on to more complicated things. I'll leave the 1/3 scale hit & miss engine for my 2nd project. :D

I've also got my eyes on a decent vertical mill that's right here in town. I'm pretty sure I'll end up with it here in the next few weeks. I've got a place for it all picked out.

Chris

browne92
10-04-2014, 09:04 AM
I've also got my eyes on a decent vertical mill that's right here in town. I'm pretty sure I'll end up with it here in the next few weeks. I've got a place for it all picked out.

He's doomed.

As others are prone to say, "Welcome to the asylum."

rock_breaker
10-04-2014, 09:29 AM
Welcome to the website Chris.
All of the aboove are correct in their assesment of the site. This group is knowlegable and willing to share experriences and information, a lot of it at the professional level. As you have probably noticed this is an international group which I believe makes it more interesting and valuable.

Have a good day

Ray

michigan doug
10-04-2014, 10:50 AM
I seriously think there is a gene for this. Let's call it the handy gene.

If you have it, you are also probably attracted to some or all of the following

steam engines
boats
trains
airplanes
making stuff you can't buy
constantly looking for ways to improve things
inventing stuff
making machinery
puzzles/locks/safes
cars
efficiency
guns
knives
archery
motorcycles
remote controlled anything
foundry work
clocks
I'm not going to pay $X.xx, I can make that...
and a bunch I'm not thinking of right now...



Now, maybe you just haven't discovered this or that particular expression of the gene yet...

chrisinestes
10-06-2014, 06:24 PM
I seriously think there is a gene for this. Let's call it the handy gene.

If you have it, you are also probably attracted to some or all of the following



steam engines - Yup, That's one of the reasons for the lathe & mill
boats - Yup, it's been a while, but RC and full scale
trains - Yup
airplanes - Yup, RC
making stuff you can't buy - Yup, can't buy or can't afford
constantly looking for ways to improve things - Yup
inventing stuff - Yup
making machinery - Working on some simple machine to crush cans with a hit & miss engine
puzzles/locks/safes - Not yet
cars - Yup, I'm a motorhead
efficiency - Yup, when I have a lot of the same thing to make
guns - Yup, I reload too
knives - Knives scare me!
archery - Not yet
motorcycles - Yup
remote controlled anything - Boats, Cars, Electric Airplanes
foundry work - Not yet
clocks - Not yet
I'm not going to pay $X.xx, I can make that... _ I'm working towards that
and a bunch I'm not thinking of right now... Anything related to the craft beer industry

Chris

Puckdropper
10-06-2014, 07:42 PM
I'm not going to pay $X.xx, I can make that... _ I'm working towards that


I've done the "I'm not going to pay $X.xx, I can make that..." several times. More often than not, I'm left with an appreciation for just how much went in to that product and a wallet that's lighter than it would be if I had just bought the product.

boslab
10-06-2014, 09:08 PM
I'm sorry to tell you that the disease is progressive, there is no known cure, archery is one of the later symptoms, it normally appears after being burgled of your shinys, as do knives, the knives are the justification for the forge and anvil, it's either knives or gates!
Further symptoms include obsessive compulsive eBay trawling
Mark

michigan doug
10-07-2014, 08:57 AM
Oh yeah, and heavy equipment...

back hoes, bulldozers, cranes, bucket trucks, military stuff, tractors,

Paul Alciatore
10-07-2014, 01:37 PM
Well welcome to the forum. Sounds like you have been into making things for some time but welcome to machining. And to the asylum, we are all a bit crazy here and there really is no cure, just maintenance.

There is something addictive about taking a lump of rough, often rusty metal and making a shinny, precision, functional part. Who would have thought that was inside there all the time? About as close to magic as I will ever get. Love it.

Happy Chips to you!

Puckdropper
10-07-2014, 09:13 PM
Oh yeah, and heavy equipment...

back hoes, bulldozers, cranes, bucket trucks, military stuff, tractors,

Those things are fun whether or not you've been blessed with the disease. Even tow trucks are great entertainment. (As long as it's not YOUR car being towed! Sometimes even then...)

chrisinestes
11-30-2014, 06:08 PM
I'm still here, just been busier than a guy with one foot in a cast trying to get around on crutches... Oh wait... I do have one foot in a cast and I am trying to get around on crutches! It's starting to make sense now...

I have managed to upgrade to a newer, bigger, & better lathe and acquire a mill. I'll start a new thread, probably 1 thread for each machine to try to keep things straight.

I'll sell the Powr-Kraft... although It'd be a lot easier to sell, and I would get more money for it if I actually get a belt for it so it can be spun up.

See you in my other threads!
Chris

flylo
11-30-2014, 07:43 PM
I've discovered the root cause of all this. Acute Iron Deficiency. If I'm not near, buying, trying to buy, using or touching heavy iron on a daily basis I get chronic withdrawl which has awful side effects. I tried IAA (iron aholics anonymous, but to no avail. All we did at the first meeting was leave early to go do some wheeling & dealing (another addiction). I'm doomed so I might as well accept & enjoy it:rolleyes: Did I tell you about the Sweeet Bridgeport that came home yesterday? Can't fight it & win, might as well love it to the end!:p


I seriously think there is a gene for this. Let's call it the handy gene.

If you have it, you are also probably attracted to some or all of the following

steam engines
boats
trains
airplanes
making stuff you can't buy
constantly looking for ways to improve things
inventing stuff
making machinery
puzzles/locks/safes
cars
efficiency
guns
knives
archery
motorcycles
remote controlled anything
foundry work
clocks
I'm not going to pay $X.xx, I can make that...
and a bunch I'm not thinking of right now...



Now, maybe you just haven't discovered this or that particular expression of the gene yet...

Cuttings
12-01-2014, 01:04 AM
Welcome aboard Chris. My path to this Forum was similar to yours.
Bought the magazine on little trip into the US a couple of years ago.
Like what I saw so I took out a subscription, found my way here and have been kicking around ever since.
I am about half way through building the Henry Ford Engine shown in a couple of earlier issues this year.
It is a little trickier than it first looks, but I am doing OK so far.

chrisinestes
12-01-2014, 03:15 PM
I've discovered the root cause of all this. Acute Iron Deficiency. If I'm not near, buying, trying to buy, using or touching heavy iron on a daily basis I get chronic withdrawl which has awful side effects. I tried IAA (iron aholics anonymous, but to no avail. All we did at the first meeting was leave early to go do some wheeling & dealing (another addiction). I'm doomed so I might as well accept & enjoy it:rolleyes: Did I tell you about the Sweeet Bridgeport that came home yesterday? Can't fight it & win, might as well love it to the end!:p

The Ford engine was what made me get a subscription. I'd wanted to build one since I saw one at an antique engine show about 5 years ago. So when I happened across an offer for a free sample issue that was the start of that engine build, I signed up. I'll buy Leon's plan set as well, even though a friend of mine said he'd walk me through the build.

Chris

George Bulliss
12-01-2014, 03:23 PM
Regarding the Ford engine. Plenty of guys are building it and a lot of them have been in touch with me. Many of the guys are experienced with model IC engines, but most have had some struggles in getting the engine to run. As can be imagined from looking at the design, the fuel/air mixture is pretty tough to make fine adjustments to. Most have had to experiment with different sizes and types of atomizer screens and modifications to the drip feed. One guy had good results running on propane.

chrisinestes
12-01-2014, 04:41 PM
The Ford engine was what made me get a subscription. I'd wanted to build one since I saw one at an antique engine show about 5 years ago. So when I happened across an offer for a free sample issue that was the start of that engine build, I signed up. I'll buy Leon's plan set as well, even though a friend of mine said he'd walk me through the build.

Chris

Of the 3 I've seen in person, 2 were built to-plan, and one was what the guy called hot-rodded. The tweaked one had a real carburetor on it and ran on either alcohol or white gas... I forget... but he said it'd run all day. The other 2 were picky. I'd likely try it to-plan, but wouldn't feel bad about putting a carb from an RC engine, or a mixer and run it on propane.

Thanks for the tip,
Chris

darryl
12-01-2014, 10:13 PM
I'm waiting to see somebody design and build a 6 cyl propane engine where two cylinders are driven by the propane pressure before it goes to the carb. Not only would it be self-starting if you can make it stop in a suitable spot each time, it would also act to cool the engine and warm the propane. Taking the idea further, two other cylinders would pump air for the engine, making it supercharged. There would be a fixed relationship between the volume of the propane cylinders and the air cylinders so that mixing is simplified. The two power cylinders would operate in the usual internal combustion engine fashion.

Who needs another project :)

Tundra Twin Track
12-01-2014, 11:12 PM
I have only been on here 10 months,lot's of knowledge and good advice, and when you get a good score on something nobody is shy,got 20 you sucks when I picked up the 25 ton Dake 6!