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View Full Version : OT slightly... its still a machine.... parts for Sears 936342?



J Tiers
10-22-2014, 01:04 AM
Specifically, I want a new blade for the thing. I'd like a blade with a lower tooth count, but they may never have made one, as thins is for a cross-cut, normally calling for a fine pitch blade.

It's a "miter box", the kind with a captive saw, which in this case is a fine tooth tensioned blade saw. This unit, actually, per Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EW0MBWE/?tag=network20-20

The 936342 Craftsman part number goes no place at Sears parts. Yet, it seems they must have made it up until relatively recently. And they should have had blades for it. I have not seen a blade of that sort in any other product.

It isn't a wonderful product, but it is a usable decent product. I don't need a power miter saw, I don't have that much call for it.

Sears still sells a similar piece, but it does not use the tensioned blade system. Structure of the thing appears to be plastic instead of the metal of the 936342, and it uses a backed saw.

boslab
10-22-2014, 03:28 AM
Strange, they have those blades in the local hardware store, I think it says picture framing saw on the nail they hang
Mark

Circlip
10-22-2014, 05:20 AM
Machine Mart (Our version of HR etc.) used to sell replacement blades on our side of the pond.

Regards Ian.

alanganes
10-22-2014, 07:46 AM
Stanley makes a similar style miter saw and lists parts for it here:

http://www.stanleytoolparts.com/mitreboxes-20-800.html

I did not look at the sears one too closely, but if the sizes look similar there may be something you could use.

J Tiers
10-22-2014, 08:12 AM
Makes sense that it would be a standard type already made, and it looks like a Stanley in many ways. Thanks for that idea.

cameron
10-22-2014, 09:21 AM
Lee Valley sells blades for Nobex miter boxes, 12 to 32 tpi. It might be possible to adapt these to fit your saw.

dp
10-22-2014, 02:24 PM
http://miterboxshop.blogspot.com/2012/04/ulmia-replacement-blade-for-352-miter.html

Might be helpful or at least a trail head for more info.

J Tiers
10-22-2014, 06:38 PM
The Stanley 20-800 looks like a lineal descendant of the one I have, Saw blades will likely fit. (or not). The Stanley is a bit cheezier, although the Craftsman unit has it's bits of cheese also.

Thanks

alanganes
10-22-2014, 08:06 PM
Well, I suppose if the Stanley one is close or even a bit longer, you might be able to get some machinist to alter it to fit. I suppose you might be able to find a machinist someplace if you ask around enough...

J Tiers
10-22-2014, 08:43 PM
!:D!

Actually, saw blades can be a hassle. They are thin, but kinda hard. Too thin to drill, harder than it is nice to punch. These are just likely spring temper, with the edge hardened more, so they might punch OK, but with a higher tonnage.

alanganes
10-22-2014, 09:32 PM
!:D!

Actually, saw blades can be a hassle. They are thin, but kinda hard. Too thin to drill, harder than it is nice to punch. These are just likely spring temper, with the edge hardened more, so they might punch OK, but with a higher tonnage.

True enough. I have nothing that would punch through such stuff. I read someplace (might have been in one of the "Bedside Reader" books) of spot annealing a hardened blade by using a mill or drill press to spin a blunt end of a steel rod against it with downward pressure, and creating a hot spot due to friction. Seems plausible, but I've never tired it. I have a few power hacksaw blades that are too long for my PH. This sort of reminded me that I ought to try that on one of those.

J Tiers
10-22-2014, 10:22 PM
I figure to sandwich it between two pieces of metal such as 1018, and drill through the lot with a cobalt drill. I'm not going to risk mushrooming a punch on it, drills are cheaper and I have lots of them.

Puckdropper
10-22-2014, 10:53 PM
True enough. I have nothing that would punch through such stuff. I read someplace (might have been in one of the "Bedside Reader" books) of spot annealing a hardened blade by using a mill or drill press to spin a blunt end of a steel rod against it with downward pressure, and creating a hot spot due to friction. Seems plausible, but I've never tired it. I have a few power hacksaw blades that are too long for my PH. This sort of reminded me that I ought to try that on one of those.

I tried that, and I think it worked. It's been a while since I was turning that saw blade into a putty knife... I wound up with a lesson on sharpening drill bits, by trying to drill through with a cheap HSS bit, dulling it, then resharpening it. I got it to work eventually, though.

Now that I think of it, I might have heated the tang with a torch to soften it.