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View Full Version : OT: post cataract surgery glare... anybody else?



DR
10-23-2014, 03:57 PM
Another medical situation...

I had retina surgery 5 years ago to cure an unusual condition. An almost guaranteed result of the eye surgery is a cataract will develop, which did. Cataract surgery cured that, but a possible by product of cataract surgery is sensitivity to daytime glare.

Just back from the ophthalmologist and she's suggesting glasses with anti-reflective lenses. The place where I get my eyeglass prescriptions filled tells me the anti-reflective lenses are primarily for night driving glare. For daytime glare they suggest polarizing lenses.

Dark tinting like sunglasses helps with glare, but I need lenses for indoor use.

By daytime glare I mean something like a white truck with black lettering on the side in direct sunlight is hard to read. Also, a shiny end mill shank with laser marking is hard to read.

Anybody else have this problem and what was your solution?

Bob Fisher
10-23-2014, 05:28 PM
Several years after cataract surgery, both eyes, I developed a blurring of vision. I was then informed that about 40% of cataract operative patients will develop a clouding of the capsule behind the lens. It was not mentioned before surgery tho. A quick couple shots with a laser took care of it tho. Sounds as tho your problem is more retina related. Not an eye doctor, never played one, etc etc. Bob.

DR
10-23-2014, 11:30 PM
Several years after cataract surgery, both eyes, I developed a blurring of vision. I was then informed that about 40% of cataract operative patients will develop a clouding of the capsule behind the lens. It was not mentioned before surgery tho. A quick couple shots with a laser took care of it tho. Sounds as tho your problem is more retina related. Not an eye doctor, never played one, etc etc. Bob.

Yes, there is a membrane that can be laser zapped. The membrane is thought to be a contributing factor in the glare I'm experiencing. In my case the membrane is only showing slight scar tissue so the doctors advised not zapping it yet since the laser procedure has some risk, although small.

I'm finding that as skilled and knowledgeable as the doctors at the medical school I was referred to are, there're some things they just don't know what causes them.

One thing I've learned from my eye problems in the recent years. If you can, go to a med school clinic for treatment. Your regular corner-store ophthalmologist doesn't have the expensive equipment to test and monitor your eye condition. Like today I had another optic nerve scan to document it's current condition. The machine costs upward of 1/4 million bucks, not in the budget for many small private clinics. The importance of these routine scans is they can spot any changes, apparently changes are what they look for.

ptjw7uk
10-24-2014, 05:07 AM
I have had my op for 2 weeks now and the only thing I have noticed apart from glare issues is that the eye is letting in more blue light in that with that eye images have a more blue tint than with the other eye. No idea why this should be must ask when I next go see the surgeon.
They did suggest using tinted glasses though.

peter

DR
10-24-2014, 10:52 AM
I have had my op for 2 weeks now and the only thing I have noticed apart from glare issues is that the eye is letting in more blue light in that with that eye images have a more blue tint than with the other eye. No idea why this should be must ask when I next go see the surgeon.
They did suggest using tinted glasses though.

peter

Yep, I see slightly different colors with the cataract eye too.

sch
10-24-2014, 03:09 PM
The reason for the blue light is simple: your cataract afflicted lens was yellowish brown, that effectively filters out the blue light from the sky, somewhat, and your new lens is
crystal clear. Your brain will adjust over a short period but blue light is everywhere due to atmospheric filtering of sunlight. That is also the reason every thing is a bit bright
post surgery, you no longer have the light loss the yellow lens absorbed. One other thing I noticed, as a high diopter myope (-12 diopters) my glasses shrank objects by
about 25 to 30% and it was a bit surprising how close things seemed for awhile post op. Kept hitting corners of cabinets and my 37" tv now looked like 42 or 46" in size.
This has also abated as my brain adjusted.

cameron
10-24-2014, 03:18 PM
In the doctor's office after having his first cataract operation, my brother was looking out the window at two women walking on the sidewalk below, one wearing a yellow blouse and green pants, the other a white blouse and blue pants. It took him a few seconds to bring the two images together and realize there was only one woman.

sasquatch
10-24-2014, 07:57 PM
One is enough, no man needs two!! Lol

Boot
10-24-2014, 08:15 PM
I had both eyes done. Cataracts taken off and implants put in. I had no problems with glare after the operation. Before everything was cloudy and night driving was a real cross to put up with.
Good luck with your eyes. Mine did not have any other complications before,but now I have the beginnings of glaucoma. I believe my diabetes is a contributing factor.

garyhlucas
10-24-2014, 08:16 PM
The doctor who did my surgery teaches it at Wills Eye in Phily. He told me that colors look brighter because a cataract is clouding of the lens and that it simply mixes all the colors coming in so they appear muted. I had the shadow effect happen to one of my eyes. It is the epithelial cells growing on the capsule that causes it. He fixed it with the laser. I mentioned that as we worked the laser I could see edges going away. He told me I was the first patient that had ever mentioned being able to see anything happen as he worked.

I miss my old vision, I was 20/1000! I could see the tiniest details like numbers on drill by holding them at the end of my nose. When I got the first eye done it was the first time I had ever seen my own feet in the shower! I also got a shock when I sat down at my desk at work, with two 24" monitors. With my new progressive glasses I could only see a small portion of the drawings on screen, the rest was completely blurred. Fortunately my opthamologist knew about the problem and I got a second set of glasses just for computer work. They focus from about 8" to about 3 feet and I leave them on my desk when I go home.

bubby-joe
10-24-2014, 08:22 PM
Had both mine done in 2002 never looked back had clouding zapped at year 1 checkup was warned about this when I had the sugery to the first eye after both eyes done I have very minor double vision and only at extreme distance 1 1/4 moon's. Going this year for another checkup have minor bluring out to about 20 ft. To Date, have not had a headache since 2002 light sensativity has never been very bad so I quess very lucky. Still from day 1 use a 2.25 reading glass for under 4 ft I buy cheap from the dollar store by the box but 30.00 CDN a year is nothing and if they getto dirty just grab a new pair and break the old dirty or the seem to come back when your trying to read a blueprint of the micrometer. For me the greens enhanced big time the dirt on the side of the road was actually light green moss and not brownish dirt like I thought. Went from legally blind to driving a transport truck like I said I never looked back. If given a choice don't wait to long to do the second the guy next door had 1 done and in the 3 years till he went to do the second one his brain just shut off the bad eye and it never came back on. Good luck and any motorcycle and metal cutting use saftey glasses, I don't ever leave home without them.

JoeLee
10-24-2014, 08:22 PM
I had my right eye done 2 years ago. The doctor said it's not very common for a person my age to develop a cataract, could have been due to a previous eye injury or exposure to UV.......... like welding, so I was told. Anyway......... I had to have the operation done twice. The first time the ahole dr. put a lens in my eye that made my vision worse than it was with the cataract. After this first operation I couldn't see my hand in front of my face, my food in my plate looked like a pile of puke, I couldn't drive at night because all the on coming head lights looked like the 5 circle Olympic symbol with star bursts to compound the issue. My depth perception was way off, I was knocking things over as I went to grab them as the objects appeared further away than they were. Finally after about a month I sought out another dr. I told them what had happened and they said that they were sure they could do much better for me. They put me through tests with equipment I've never seen before. Unlike the first doctor whose tests were nothing more than what you would get at a regular eye exam.
Long story short............ they removed the lens from my eye and put the new one in. My vision is now almost 20 20. I don't need glasses to read or drive. I don't need them in the shop either. Head lights are now just bright normal dots with no glare rings or star bursts.
Lucky for me. My right eye is my dominate eye too.
That doctor that did the first operation on my eye is no longer with the medical group, they threw her out as I wasn't the only person that she screwed up.

JL................

oldtiffie
10-24-2014, 09:26 PM
My wife and I have our eyes checked by an Ophthalmologist every two years - as my wife has diabetes and I have Pterygiums in both eyes. Neither of us has any real problems with stuff growing across or in our eyes although my pterygiums may need to be removed but not yet as they do not affect my vision.

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Pterygium

https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=pterygium

38_Cal
10-24-2014, 10:06 PM
Had my right eye done three weeks ago, left one will be done Monday. Yep, colors are brighter, distance vision is better, close up is worse. I was told that in a month or so after the second eye is done, I'll go in for another exam to see what is needed for close vision. Thinking about getting a set of safety glasses with reader lenses in the meantime.

sch
10-25-2014, 09:15 AM
As a high myope, my focal range pre cataract was 3" to ~8" from my eye. Post op it is 36" to infinity. So I walk around in a 3' radius of fuzzy vision, but can function well without glasses upto
a point. For reading Costco $18 for 3 pair 2.75D glasses work well and I have 5 pair scattered around. For computers 1.75D works better and a pair at each machine. For out door or shop work
I took the surround type safety glasses and used the 2.75 inserts like these but cheaper: http://optx2020.com/p-38-hydrotac-stick-on-bifocal-2-pair-offer-available-for-consumer-purchase-only.aspx?gclid=CIeR2ujvx8ECFZBi7AodpFAALA& You can find these for about $10 if you rummage. There are lots of small lights that integrate with glasses for use in dark areas.
I also have an old 4D magnifying visor that helps with really close up work. I spent $125 on a set of trifocals with reader at bottom, computer in middle and clear on top but only use them
occasionally as the reader part is smaller than convenient to I have to sweep side to side on the page. The Costco readers have a much larger field of view.
For me 4D gets me in focal range of 6" or so, 2.75D is 13-18" and 1.75D is 24-36".

When I bicycle, uncorrected vision with sunglasses means I can't read the numbers on the bike computer or interpret a map, so a set of the stickon inserts fixed that. I have not had any of the
4 sets of inserts I use fall off yet. For those on medicare, in theory they assist you in paying for prescription glasses needed post cataract surgery but since this is subject to your deductible
in practice that cancels it out.

saltmine
10-25-2014, 12:47 PM
I just had cataract surgery in July. (the second eye was done in August). Recovery went well, and I'm able to see much better than I ever recall. When recently checked at the office with an old conventional eye chart, the doctor told me my eyesight was just short of 20-20. in both eyes. This was a fairly extreme change I had to deal with when you consider originally, my left eye was 20-200, and my right eye was 20-50. Having 20-200 vision in both eyes is legal blindness. The only problem I've encountered is my extreme near-sightedness is gone. Yes, I have to wear reading glasses to do anything up close (a minor annoyance) By needing reading glasses, I "killed two birds with one stone". I got myself the correct diopter lenses in a pair of certified safety glasses, that I use out in the shop, a cheap pair of reading glasses accompanies my computer in my office. (I used to have an aversion to wearing safety glasses), but, now I'm compelled to. Personally, I think its the best investment I've made in years. Of course, when it was discovered that I have a bad liver, the doctor had a fit, because I elected to have eye surgery in my condition. The surgery was a "done deal" long before the liver problem was diagnosed. I suppose I'll die with good eyesight, now.

michigan doug
10-25-2014, 01:00 PM
Cataracts usually take a long time to develop. During that time, along with distorting and blurring the image, it also works like cheap sunglasses, reducing the total amount of light that reaches the retina.

Everybody thinks it's the pupil that regulates the light, and it does to a very limited extent. But the retina does the lion's share of dark/light adaptation. There is a theory that your retina adapts to the low light conditions of having cataracts, and then when the cataracts are removed, it may take months before the retina has fully adapted to the full/bright light conditions with a new implant.

There are other issues as well, many of which have been already mentioned.

hth,

doug the eye doctor

Ridgerunner
10-25-2014, 07:39 PM
Did any of the docs say there would be a restriction on welding or any shop activities after the surgery?

It was explained to me that a person could choose one from several different focal length of lens. One was for distance, one for mid range, or one for close up. If the distance one was picked then reading glasses were mandatory. If the close up was chosen, then glasses for distance would be needed. They said it depended on whether the majority of a persons work or interest was close up then they could do the lens that way.
Medicare would pay for a basic clear lens without any correction. It was $1000.00 for any of the above lens that have correction. There was also a lens that that was like a tri focal or something like that that was not too popular.

J. Randall
10-25-2014, 08:09 PM
I had both removed, and the implants about a month apart probably 4 yrs. ago. No issues with light then or now, don't have to use anything except cheap readers for real fine print. Can read the computer monitor fine, and even read a novel without anything if in good light. I love it, had been really nearsighted and worn glasses since the 8 grade.
James

JoeLee
10-25-2014, 08:37 PM
Did any of the docs say there would be a restriction on welding or any shop activities after the surgery?

It was explained to me that a person could choose one from several different focal length of lens. One was for distance, one for mid range, or one for close up. If the distance one was picked then reading glasses were mandatory. If the close up was chosen, then glasses for distance would be needed. They said it depended on whether the majority of a persons work or interest was close up then they could do the lens that way.
Medicare would pay for a basic clear lens without any correction. It was $1000.00 for any of the above lens that have correction. There was also a lens that that was like a tri focal or something like that that was not too popular. I specifically asked my eye dr. about welding and he said no restrictions. My lens cost me 1K out of pocket as it was a premium lens which corrected for the astigmatism. It made a world of difference, why skimp........ it your eyes!
It was explained to me that there are multi-focal lenses but if you have an astigmatism it's a no go.

JL...................

hermetic
10-26-2014, 07:33 AM
Had cataract surgery to both eyes some 20 years ago, agree 100% night driving is a trial (twilight is the worst) but for the glare problem I wear prescription lenses with a yellow/brown tint , they used to be called motorway driving glasses in the uk, also advertised as worn by the police and pilots. I find that with them driving is a pleasure again, but without, even on days with cloud cover, the contrast between above and below the horizon is too great, and my eyes start to burn and water. I have tried and failed to post a pic of the tint. Some forums image handling is so simple, and others, like this one, are for reasons only known to the designer, unnecasarily complex. If anyone can enlighten me on how, I will do it!
Phil,
UK

Seastar
10-26-2014, 08:44 AM
I had both eyes done 2 months apart 3 years ago.
Had the laser slits a year ago.
Very good results with no side effects or glare.
I am still flying my airplane at age 83.
Now my problem is wet macular degeneration that is under control with injections of Avastatin into the interior of the eye.
They tell me I will need them every 6 weeks for the rest of my life.
OUCH!
Bill

boslab
10-26-2014, 09:26 AM
Are you saying they poke a needle into your eyeball, eeech, the arseholes in the hospital taking blood trained with a javelin, hitting a vein is hard enough for them, I've had to do it myself twice!
I can't imagine getting poked in the eye!
I am however grateful your ok
Mark

DR
10-26-2014, 11:53 AM
Are you saying they poke a needle into your eyeball, eeech, the arseholes in the hospital taking blood trained with a javelin, hitting a vein is hard enough for them, I've had to do it myself twice!
I can't imagine getting poked in the eye!
I am however grateful your ok
Mark

Poked in the eye.....yeah, ouch.

When I had my cataract surgery they prefer not to totally knock you out with the anesthesia. Actually they give you a choice, partial knock out and if that's too uncomfortable you tell them and they'll up the drip to total knockout. Well, I started to feel pain, problem was I was paralyzed to the extent I couldn't convey the message to them. You're in such a twilight zone that it's not like being wide awake. Not a pleasant experience.

With the retina surgery that was smooth, I was able to talk with the surgeon and ask him how things were going. Totally pain free.