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View Full Version : Basement shop enlargement, ballpark cost idea?



sandiapaul
10-24-2014, 09:29 AM
All,

My shop is in my walkout basement, and like most shops its not big enough! I keep imagining(dreaming, really) that if I could blow out the outside wall and move it out about 12' I would be golden. This would entail excavating a fair amount of dirt, building 3 new walls, roof, etc...

The outside wall is 24' wide. In reality I think I would keep the existing outside wall, make a large opening where I have a 6' wide double window, and enlarge my current 3' entry door to say 4' for easier access when moving equipment in and out.

I could do all the interior/finish work.

Any rough ideas on what this might cost? I'm in NJ.

Thanks!

Paul

loose nut
10-24-2014, 10:29 AM
I think your estimate is right, it would cost about what a new ball park would.:):D:eek:

Sorry couldn't resist.:rolleyes:

DR
10-24-2014, 10:56 AM
Figure $300/sq ft........

mikem
10-24-2014, 11:33 AM
I just added a 12 by 22 room onto the house with poured walls in the basement, gable roof and stud walls above grade. I did all the drywall, wiring and finish work. It was about $100/ square foot. Here in Nebraska, things are probably cheaper than New Jersey. --Mike.

mikem
10-24-2014, 11:37 AM
The 12 by 22 basement is ALL MINE!

lakeside53
10-24-2014, 12:07 PM
Best way to "estimate" is draw up rough plans and get 3 quotes. Rework from there.

Yes, a lot less issues (and $$$) of you utilize the use the existing 6 foot section for access.

Luke55
10-24-2014, 12:20 PM
cost me $3250 for 8X14 2 years ago including cutting opening door in original basement. I had two isolated opening door on top

Alistair Hosie
10-24-2014, 01:06 PM
Can't you do it yourself with the help of friends and family? I admire your way of thinking I did this with my woodshop and all the work was done with my sons and other family help. We also did all the interior woodworking stuff and had an electrician come in and check it all over.It is a great thing to dream about then when you do it you feel really wonderful .It is a great feeling really it is.I wish you well. Alistair

sandiapaul
10-24-2014, 04:32 PM
Thanks all for the replies.....and the numbers are all over the place!

And yes lakeside the best is to get real quotes...but I'd like to have an idea if this thing is remotely affordable before I waste 3 contractors time.

I spent the day down there trying to mentally wish the wall 12' further out. Didn't work.

Thanks again,

Paul

J Tiers
10-24-2014, 06:46 PM
Remember, it's not just a shop, it's the foundation for a deck!

Another thing.... 10 x 10 will not be a lot cheaper than 10 x 20, despite the cost per square foot figure....Especially if you are sharing a wall with existing. It doesn't quite multiply like that, but that's a good way to rough estimate. Sometimes the rough estimate becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.... when the contractor bids it that way, as if it were free-standing.

10 x 10 may be a lot cheaper than 15 x 15, depending on how the overhead is done. The wider span makes for more cost in roof support. But you use fewer, so it might be closer to a wash.

Maybe you should see what costs the most in materials etc around your area. Then pitch it right down the middle of the low-cost solution.

fjk
10-27-2014, 09:09 AM
All,

My shop is in my walkout basement, and like most shops its not big enough! I keep imagining(dreaming, really) that if I could blow out the outside wall and move it out about 12' I would be golden. This would entail excavating a fair amount of dirt, building 3 new walls, roof, etc...

The outside wall is 24' wide. In reality I think I would keep the existing outside wall, make a large opening where I have a 6' wide double window, and enlarge my current 3' entry door to say 4' for easier access when moving equipment in and out.

I could do all the interior/finish work.

Any rough ideas on what this might cost? I'm in NJ.

Thanks!

Paul

First, you'll never "be golden" ... you'll always find more stuff than you have room...

Definitely keep the outside wall; if you blow away 24' of foundation supporting the house... you'll need steel or the like, very expensive. it also can be nice to divide a shop into some rooms --- eg a separate room for painting and finishing (with minimal dust) is A Very Good Thing To Have. You can use that existing foundation wall to your advantage that way.

What are you planning to put on top of the new foundation walls? Are you just roofing it over, building a new room for the main part of the house, etc? That also would affect the end price.

For what it's worth, here in the metro Boston area, about 10 years ago we put an addition on our house that is about the size you're talking. The foundation is not walk-out, it's all sunken, with poured concrete walls. Our lot is pretty small and I seem to recall that they did not use a large excavator. I want to say that the excavation and foundation work cost in the 40K range, but my memory is a bit hazy on that.

Finally, for what it's worth, I've found that for any significant home renovation/expansion project, assume you'll end up spending 2x what the original estimate/bid/what-you-think numbers are. This goes for everything from the "oopses" to the "we didn't expect to find _that_" to the "we forget to include in the estimates" to the "Honey, let's also dos".

Rosco-P
10-27-2014, 12:23 PM
Can't forget about any Engineering work that might be required plus the cost of producing any plans acceptable to your building department. Consider designing a seperate area in the addition for all grinding and making it a negative presure room so no dust excapes.

DR
10-27-2014, 12:43 PM
Can't forget about any Engineering work that might be required plus the cost of producing any plans acceptable to your building department. Consider designing a seperate area in the addition for all grinding and making it a negative presure room so no dust excapes.

Figure about 10% of project cost for architect's drawings and engineering. That is, assuming this project will have the blessings of the local government's building department.

If this is done off the radar costs will be substantially lower overall. Better watch out for your home insurance people if done on the sly.

sch
10-27-2014, 03:12 PM
Doing stuff 'on the sly' with the building inspectors not involved can be very expensive long term. In my area people have gotten dinged hard for home improvement projects not permitted.
Not only inspectors driving around to inspections in the area noticing the activity and contractor trucks but other contractors have been known to get in on the reportage as well. Be hard
to do a 10x20 enlargement without someone noticing... Not to say you can't do some of the interior work yourself. Then there is the uncertainty of how your HO insurance would cover
uninspected work should something happen. Inspection departments are very aware of who has licenses to do work in your area and who doesn't. Contractor friend reports several
smaller cities in our area regularly drive around the alleys to look for contractor trucks, labeled or generic and check licensing. His company has dozens of licenses to cover localities they work
in, mostly commercial.

Paul Alciatore
10-27-2014, 03:44 PM
On knocking out that entire wall, it is probably a load bearing one and you would need to properly support the load above it while adding a steel or two or three wood beams to carry that load. Temporary jacks and raise the load a fraction of an inch. Wall out. Beams in. Then lower the load back down on them. I had to replace two rotted wood beams in my Florida house with this procedure and they only supported the roof above. I did it myself with careful planning and a lot of caution. I rented the jacks and a couple of temporary aluminum beams.

Don't even think about doing it without the temporary supports.

As far as doing it on the sly, I would not recommend it. The inspectors are there for a reason and if you work with them from the start, they are usually very helpful. And then you are at least partially shielded from liability if anything happens.

Jon Heron
10-27-2014, 03:49 PM
As far as doing it on the sly, I would not recommend it. The inspectors are there for a reason and if you work with them from the start, they are usually very helpful. And then you are at least partially shielded from liability if anything happens.
Those are wise words on projects such as this.
cheers,
Jon

justanengineer
10-27-2014, 04:09 PM
Assuming I read this correctly, you want to build what is basically a small unfinished connected garage on the end of your walkout basement? With a slab, stick walls, and roof I'd guess in the expensive part of Jersey you'd be ~$50/ft^2.

Personally, I agree with the comment about DIY'ing this yourself with a couple friends/family. At least for my relatives that would be a 2 weekend project, one to pour the slab, another to build the structure.

Rosco-P
10-27-2014, 06:30 PM
If you're not tied to the town you currently live, maybe this is a reason to move to some nearby town with lower taxes, less congestion, bigger lots, bigger houses (bigger basements!), big detached garage for doing painting, sandblasting, welding, grinding, etc. in.

R.burgy
10-27-2014, 09:44 PM
I just got done building a nice big bed room for mom, and a nice big garage underneayh for me!!! It is a great feeling when it is over. I did it all myself with the help of family. So much more satisfying. I stare at it frequently, and i would do it the exact same way if i had to do it over. I love my garage. Just think of all the new tools im gonna get before i build another one!

sandiapaul
10-28-2014, 07:24 AM
Again thanks guys...Rosco-P you actually hit on something that is in the mix...I wanted to do a sanity check on what this might cost. We might be moving, but it could be a few years. I'd like to get the bigger shop NOW, but I think it might have to wait. My shop is business/hobby so some of the costs could be absorbed by the business. Yesterday I called around and asked what it would cost to get my oil tank moved out of the basement and relocated outside to give me some more space. That was not cost effective! ($2000 +)

Paul

polaraligned
10-28-2014, 08:24 PM
I spent the last 28 years doing residential construction in NJ. Bunch of variables here based on your grades and how you are going to put a roof on this, but figure $20k to $25k. You can draw and submit the architectural plans yourself in NJ, and an engineer should not be necessary as most towns let you draw the proposed addition on an existing copy of your survey as long as it is not too old.