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mars-red
10-29-2014, 07:01 PM
I'm curious if others on here with change gear lathes have come up with anything nifty for storing their gears. I'd love to see pics of what others have come up with.

Over the past few weeks I've been thinking about it. The gears for my previous machine were just kept in a small toolbox under the bench, and I wanted something better this time. Keeping them stacked up looks neat, but digging out the one you need and putting it back in the pile when you're done is sort of a hassle. And I'm always worried they'll get knocked over. I wanted a way to keep them stored without needing a bunch of space, but with quick and easy access. I eventually decided that a stack of very narrow shelves was probably the best idea, then it occurred to me I might find a quicker solution in the home/kitchen section of my local department store. I found an extremely inexpensive 2 piece dish drying rack that was almost exactly what I needed. With a bit of cutting and bending, this is what I came up with... not sure if it will be a permanent solution yet, but it's great for now:

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-J9OFFyNjnrg/VFFv1Xzp7dI/AAAAAAAAHsg/Evi_J9dESv4/s912/changegear%2520rack%25201.jpg

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-9f9BispqDZU/VFFv3MjUE5I/AAAAAAAAHso/z0DcmOUIags/s720/changegear%2520rack%25202.jpg

rythmnbls
10-29-2014, 07:19 PM
My solution.
http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/showpost.php?p=199214&postcount=1

Regards,

Steve

iMisspell
10-29-2014, 07:22 PM
nothing fancy for me.
piece of plywood with some long (2" i think) dry wall screws.
Was gonna use nails, but the head of the screws would prevent them from falling off (for what ever reason).

Maybe to save more space, could pair the gears two per screw ???

http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a570/iMisspell/IMG_20141029_191029_651_zpsc6ge4o6r.jpg (http://s1284.photobucket.com/user/iMisspell/media/IMG_20141029_191029_651_zpsc6ge4o6r.jpg.html)

jdunmyer
10-29-2014, 07:23 PM
That dish rack is a great idea, it'd work well for something like saw blades in the woodshop also.

John Stevenson
10-29-2014, 09:03 PM
This was my new lathe when i got it.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/geartrain1.jpg


This was after a few mods.


http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/geartrain2.jpg

The main train has been replaced by timing belt which allows me to run at far higher speeds with less noise and all the common threads can be done at this setting or with the pulleys reversed.

For all specials or imperial [ this is a metric lathe and was bought as such ] then the gears are all to hand under the cover to stop having to root thru. The two large 120 / 127 transposition gears live on the banjo all the while.

Paul Alciatore
10-29-2014, 09:41 PM
My solution:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/EPAIII/Web%20Post%20Photos/P08Crop_zpsa9668801.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/EPAIII/media/Web%20Post%20Photos/P08Crop_zpsa9668801.jpg.html)

I had built the shelf unit and saw all that wasted space on the upright. So I printed some full sized labels with the gears on them and pasted them on. Then a few screws and done. Each gear is instantly visible and available without moving anything. And right at hand, next to the banjo arm. There are several additional compound gears including my metric conversion stored in the same way on the other side of that upright. Only difference is they required longer screws.

Inspired by this, you can see that I added a piece of shelf board below the table level to hang my clamp sets.

That photo was in my trailer shop. The trailer is in storage with most of my shop in it. When I get the lathe in my garage, I will "discover" the unused space on the other shelf upright so I will have to do something with it too. Perhaps I will use pegboard there.

mars-red
10-29-2014, 10:11 PM
Wow really clever stuff here guys, this is great!

Doc Nickel
10-29-2014, 10:40 PM
Back when I had a change-gear lathe, I struggled with the same kind of issues. I eventually figured out that the best solution was a custom-fitted box attached directly to the lathe, that had a shaft upon which one could stack all the gears in order. better still, once so situated, one could add a secondary gear on a lever, so that you could select the gear you wanted and use it in place, without having to remove it from the stack. :D

Since that discovery, I've used that storage method for all my subsequent lathes. :)

Doc.

RichR
10-29-2014, 10:40 PM
. Keeping them stacked up looks neat, but digging out the one you need and putting it back in the pile when you're done is sort of a hassle. And I'm always worried they'll get knocked over.

So turn the stack 90 degrees so they stand on end. Make a shelf which slopes slightly towards the wall so they can't roll off and add end caps to the shelf
for them to lean against.

mars-red
10-30-2014, 12:02 AM
So turn the stack 90 degrees so they stand on end. Make a shelf which slopes slightly towards the wall so they can't roll off and add end caps to the shelf
for them to lean against.

Well that's sort of what I did, but without turning it 90 degrees... and without having to build shelves. :)

Jim Hubbell
10-30-2014, 02:34 PM
I had a "mirror door medicine cabinet" laying about. Removed the shelves and installed 5/8 in. dowel pegs spaced for the various gears. Wrote the tooth count on the end of the dowels Then hung the cabinet on the wall near lathe headstock. Easy to use and out of the way.

wheeltapper
10-30-2014, 05:55 PM
this is my way.
http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm72/wheeltapper_2008/model%20engineering%20stuff/changewheelholder.jpg (http://s293.photobucket.com/user/wheeltapper_2008/media/model%20engineering%20stuff/changewheelholder.jpg.html)

Roy.

Paul Alciatore
10-30-2014, 09:24 PM
I like it. How did you cut the slots with different radii?


this is my way.
http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm72/wheeltapper_2008/model%20engineering%20stuff/changewheelholder.jpg (http://s293.photobucket.com/user/wheeltapper_2008/media/model%20engineering%20stuff/changewheelholder.jpg.html)

Roy.

Doc Nickel
10-30-2014, 09:47 PM
I like it. How did you cut the slots with different radii?

-It's laminated. Seems the gear sections were cut to shape with a bandsaw or something, and the 'spacers' made to stack them together. Look close- you can see the spacers appear to be thin plywood, while the gear sections are particle board.

Nice work, too. Handy and compact. Photo almost made it look like it was hung on the wall, making me wonder, just for a second, how he kept the gears from falling out. :D

Doc.

DICKEYBIRD
10-30-2014, 10:24 PM
Here's what I did a few years ago. The gears are stored out of the muck & mire plus changing setups is easier.
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/37869-Home-Made-Quick-Change-Gearbox?highlight=GEARBOX

J Tiers
10-30-2014, 11:00 PM
I just keep mine in a drawer, stacked 2 or 3 high at most.

But, nemmind the gears, I like the lathe.... Is that an 8" precision or a 608? I assume it has the 4NS collets? If so, you have a goodly amount of them, for sure.

AND, BOTH types of crosslide.... An excess of riches..... any other goodies with it? A traverse milling attachment perhaps? The gear cutter and milling attachment?

One day I will finish re-doing the basket case 608 I have. Just plain t-slot compound and no extra goodies, I am afraid, although it is a 5C with QC box.

oldtiffie
10-31-2014, 01:18 AM
My lathe does not have a quick-change gear box so I have quite a few gears - all with a 20mm bore (its a metric lathe).

I have two 20mm hot rolled rods with the ends faced off. I use them to put the gears on in two stepped cones format. They just sit in the bottom of the draw under/near my lathe head-stock and are easy to get out and to remover/replace the gears with minimum foot-print and no use of bench or wall space and no need to make any-thing special for them.

mars-red
10-31-2014, 08:20 AM
I just keep mine in a drawer, stacked 2 or 3 high at most.

But, nemmind the gears, I like the lathe.... Is that an 8" precision or a 608? I assume it has the 4NS collets? If so, you have a goodly amount of them, for sure.

AND, BOTH types of crosslide.... An excess of riches..... any other goodies with it? A traverse milling attachment perhaps? The gear cutter and milling attachment?

One day I will finish re-doing the basket case 608 I have. Just plain t-slot compound and no extra goodies, I am afraid, although it is a 5C with QC box.

I came across my old Rivett this past summer - it's an 8" Precision, made somewhere between 1905 and 1912. It's in nice shape but needed some love. The worst problems it had were a broken compound slide, and a break-out in the change gear quadrant. It came with replacements, but fitting them was not exactly plug-and-play. You're right, it takes 4NS collets and it came with a few. 7 of the collets it came with were octagonal (first time in my life I'd ever seen octagonal collets)... when I bought the machine I thought they were hex, then realized when I was cleaning them up what they actually were. I traded them to another Rivett enthusiast for a bunch of collets in sizes I needed, as well as a 3 jaw chuck. If I can get my hands on 5/8" and 39/64" then I'll have 1/4" to 5/8" by 64ths.

Unfortunately I don't have a milling attachment, but I'm in the process of fabbing one using an old #4 Stark compound slide. That Stark slide is what you see on the back of the lathe right now. I've been thinking about making a taper attachment for it someday, that would be nice to have. A gear cutting attachment would be nice, but I have a tiny one for my watchmakers lathe, along with a couple of sets of cutters, that I can use for watch-sized gears, and for larger gears I now have a small vertical mill that will accommodate my old dividing head.

I remember reading some posts somewhere about your 608, I think you were in the process of scraping it... scraping one of these must be one heck of a challenge!

J Tiers
10-31-2014, 08:30 AM
I remember reading some posts somewhere about your 608, I think you were in the process of scraping it... scraping one of these must be one heck of a challenge!

For sure. I completed the crosslide assembly, and have to get another longer straightedge to get on to scraping the bed. I may have to make a special angle fixture to get into the dovetail for the carriage.

vpt
10-31-2014, 09:33 AM
I store my gears in a box on the side of the lathe. :D

thaiguzzi
10-31-2014, 11:13 AM
I store my gears in a box on the side of the lathe. :D

I store my gears in a small cardboard box in the lathe cabinet stand. Have to sift thru them to find the one i want. About once a year i may need the metric transposer, the rest of the time it's all std imperial stuff and feeds with the QCGB.

vpt
11-01-2014, 08:59 AM
I do have my old change gears in a drawer on the lathe table that I also keep around for metric combinations with the QCGB. Thew humor in my previous post was about my gears being in the quick change on the side of the lathe.

thaiguzzi
11-01-2014, 10:55 AM
Ah so.... humor... said in an Oriental tone of voice...