PDA

View Full Version : OT: What would you do with lead bricks?



RussZHC
11-06-2014, 02:01 PM
Locally many auctions are for typical farming equipment so not a lot of machinery. One of the places I search occasionally is the government surplus sales where, if nothing else, the range of items is huge.

What would you do with a few lead bricks?

https://www.gcsurplus.ca/mn-eng.cfm?snc=wfsav&sc=enc-bid&scn=174144&lcn=319489&lct=L&srchtype=&lci=&str=21&ltnf=1&frmsr=1&sf=ferm-clos

bobw53
11-06-2014, 02:14 PM
Why you would have to build race cars and use them for ballast in the frame rails of course.

Hang them on the back of your tractor, and if you don't have a tractor, now you have an excuse to buy one.

Stamp 24k on them and paint them gold.

Make a really heavy wall.

Yow Ling
11-06-2014, 02:56 PM
You could make a room where it was safe to take your tin foil hat off

Fasttrack
11-06-2014, 03:25 PM
Soft blow, non-marring hammers of course!

gvasale
11-06-2014, 03:30 PM
That could make a lot of bullets...

atomarc
11-06-2014, 03:39 PM
I was in the U.S. Navy in 1965 going to 'C' school in Key West Florida. On one of my duty weekends our job was to ballast a ship destined for torpedo target training/sinking in the gulf. We loaded the hull with lead bricks so it would float at the same depth as if manned and in service. It was towed out into deep water, torpedoed and sunk by a submarine. I don't know if they were doing artificial reefs in those days but it seems all that lead wouldn't be too good for the environment...who knows?

Stuart

MaxHeadRoom
11-06-2014, 03:54 PM
to ballast a ship

Stuart

On an allied note, I collected a few hundred pounds when I looked at using it for a sailboat keel I intended building , if there are any boat builder near you they may be interested.
Max.

brian Rupnow
11-06-2014, 04:48 PM
Know anybody in the Mafia?---With a boat??-----

Weston Bye
11-06-2014, 04:58 PM
You could make a room where it was safe to take your tin foil hat off

Good one Yow.:o

Black_Moons
11-06-2014, 05:30 PM
I like the rackmount lead blocks. With RF connectors no less.

boslab
11-06-2014, 06:17 PM
When I started working for British steel I started in a department called nucleonics in the reaseach lab, we used lead shielding bricks when handling certain radioisotopes like Cobalt 60 and such, these were stacked between you and the source, the walls of this place were made of a concrete called barium concrete, the bricks for experiments were lead, but not ordinary lead, pre nuclear lead rescued from battleships sunk in the First World War, pre nuclear lead, very expensive!, someone was nicking them and melting them for fishing weights!, the boss wasn't happy at all!
Mark

Alan Douglas
11-06-2014, 06:31 PM
My college physics lab had similar bricks. You had to be very careful when handling them to avoid nicking or deforming the edges, or they wouldn't stack closely.

jdunmyer
11-06-2014, 06:32 PM
Fasttrack said:
Soft blow, non-marring hammers of course!


What an idea! I have just obtained 2 lead hammer molds, one each 3# and 4# size. Although I have only one handle, it appears easy to make additional ones. In fact, we're getting ready to cast 5 of each size.

If we had all those lead bricks, we could make a hammer for each & every one of us!

Paul Alciatore
11-06-2014, 06:42 PM
Well, it came from the ENVIRONMENT, didn't it?

And where are you going to put it, in the twilight zone?




I was in the U.S. Navy in 1965 going to 'C' school in Key West Florida. On one of my duty weekends our job was to ballast a ship destined for torpedo target training/sinking in the gulf. We loaded the hull with lead bricks so it would float at the same depth as if manned and in service. It was towed out into deep water, torpedoed and sunk by a submarine. I don't know if they were doing artificial reefs in those days but it seems all that lead wouldn't be too good for the environment...who knows?

Stuart

flylo
11-06-2014, 07:12 PM
Paint them gold & restock Fort Knox!

Fasttrack
11-06-2014, 07:13 PM
When I started working for British steel I started in a department called nucleonics in the reaseach lab, we used lead shielding bricks when handling certain radioisotopes like Cobalt 60 and such, these were stacked between you and the source, the walls of this place were made of a concrete called barium concrete, the bricks for experiments were lead, but not ordinary lead, pre nuclear lead rescued from battleships sunk in the First World War, pre nuclear lead, very expensive!, someone was nicking them and melting them for fishing weights!, the boss wasn't happy at all!
Mark

Prenuclear steel is often preferred for sensitive experiments. Regarding lead, we really want "roman lead". The older the better! For very sensitive experiments, old lead has about 100,000 times less radioactivity than new lead. Newly smelted lead tends to have a fair amount of Pb-210, which decays with a half-life of about 20 years. If you've got some lead that's thousands of years old, you can bet all of the Pb-210 is long gone!

Paul Alciatore
11-06-2014, 07:24 PM
8900 Pounds.

Around $6900 scrap price.

Around $30K to $40K for new sheet or brick.

You gotta load it and transport it.

I would wait until the auction is over and see if it sold. If not, I would offer $3000 and they gotta load it in my truck. It's on pallets so they must have a forklift. Lazy bastards!

oldtiffie
11-06-2014, 07:33 PM
Paint them gold & restock Fort Knox!

Nah.

Paint them gold and try sending them to China as a credit to what the USA owes China with the bonds the USA is stuck with.

38_Cal
11-06-2014, 07:58 PM
Assuming no loss through spillage/spatter, and no loss through skimming off oxidation/impurities, that would make about 241,500 bullets at 200 grains weight each. Of course, some tin would have to be added to get the alloy to the proper hardness...about 345 pounds to get an alloy of 20-1, so that would stretch things out for a total of 253,575 bullets. My yet unborn grandchildren would still be shooting them when I'm a distant memory of their parents!

boslab
11-06-2014, 08:09 PM
Isn't it odd how tungsten and gold have virtually the same density, very handy if your sticking rods of it inside gold bricks, nothing to do with lead but it popped into my head, must have been a Nasty surprise when they melted one!
Lead is interesting stuff, it recrystallises at room temperature, also plays havoc with the old nervous system, lead poisoning was very common less now though, handle with care as they say!
Mark

bob_s
11-06-2014, 09:02 PM
Used in active catholic protection systems like pipelines through cities

wierdscience
11-06-2014, 09:41 PM
Used in active catholic protection systems like pipelines through cities

What do they use for protestants?

Lew Hartswick
11-07-2014, 09:34 AM
I don't know what to do with THAT many, but I have 4 (occasionally wish I had a few more) that are
the ideal thing to hold things down while gluing etc. These came from an old neighbor friend that use
be at Los Alamos . NO they are not radioactive. :-) Probably shielding for a scintillation counter. :-)
...lew...

MaxHeadRoom
11-07-2014, 09:47 AM
. NO they are not radioactive. :-) ..lew...

They were once.. A long time ago :p
Max.

KiddZimaHater
11-07-2014, 10:01 AM
Melt them into big blobs, and sell them at the next Renaissance Festival as 'Dragon Droppings'.
(I actually saw someone doing this)

loose nut
11-07-2014, 10:17 AM
Use them to make some decent paint!!!

cameron
11-07-2014, 03:33 PM
I agree with Lew, very handy to have some compact weights on hand. I've got a lot of 35 pounders, and make frequent use of about half a dozen. Right now I've got four of them holding down the foot of a ladder while I rebuild the top of my shop chimney.

darryl
11-07-2014, 04:36 PM
Melt them in a crucible made from piezo-ceramic, under extreme pressure, while feeding a certain frequency into the piezo wiring. Out comes gold.

It would be a little more complex than this, of course, but nothing that an HSMer couldn't handle :)

Rosco-P
11-07-2014, 06:40 PM
Used in active catholic protection systems like pipelines through cities

Aren't you thinking of Zinc?

loose nut
11-07-2014, 07:08 PM
Use it as shielding on your home built nuclear reactor, just as a back up power supply not for breading Plutonium. That would be bad. Muwah hah hah hah hah.

Mike Nash
11-07-2014, 07:24 PM
I could fashion some of them into balloons to help me shuffle the rest around every time I decide I need to get to something else stored behind them.

CCWKen
11-07-2014, 10:37 PM
Lead could be the next precious metal. Have you priced car batteries lately? :eek:

J. Randall
11-07-2014, 10:58 PM
Used in active catholic protection systems like pipelines through cities

By active, do you mean impressed current systems? If so where are they using the lead at, I worked in that field many yrs. ago, and I am not remembering the use of lead.
James

justanengineer
11-07-2014, 11:00 PM
I'd be starting an arsenal...

boslab
11-08-2014, 05:55 AM
How about diving weights, they were quite pricy when I used to do it, gave that up, it's too bloody cold in the North Sea, and the Irish Sea ain't much better!
Mark

Frank K
11-08-2014, 01:24 PM
Had a few hundred pounds of lead bricks like those. Welded up a couple of trays from angle iron. Each held about 100 lbs. of bricks. When I had to tow my ATV trailer on the highway empty, I'd throw them in to give it some stability. When I needed to load up I'd just move them to the pickup bed for the ride home.

QSIMDO
11-08-2014, 08:54 PM
Sell 'em back to the government at twice what you paid.

ulav8r
11-09-2014, 09:00 PM
Bullets and sailboat ballast.