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RichR
11-08-2014, 01:51 AM
Picked this up on Craigslist today for $50:
http://i60.tinypic.com/nedf1x.jpg

http://i59.tinypic.com/14o3kgn.jpg

http://i58.tinypic.com/x2tnw0.jpg

http://i62.tinypic.com/2hyv1xw.jpg

RichR
11-08-2014, 01:52 AM
The belts are shot and slip a bit and the saw really needs a good cleaning. I gave it a quick lube to try it out.
At 25 minutes to cut this piece of 1" x 0.75" aluminum it's no speed demon, but the cut is straight and clean.
The blade is probably too fine for aluminum which I'm sure didn't help:
http://i59.tinypic.com/23pr91.jpg

Old Hat
11-08-2014, 02:20 AM
Power hacksaws are Cool!
Nice find!

boslab
11-08-2014, 03:04 AM
Kennedy made a little one too, l like donkey saws, and shapers, and slotters, and planers, do you think I have some reciprocating disease?, that's a good name for it, reciprocating iron disease, I'd like a film of one with the soundtrack of a woman moaning dubbed in to fool the missus that she's caught me red handed watching a porn film(it would be to me!)
Nice catch
You suck
Mark

RichR
11-08-2014, 08:16 AM
Hi Mark

... do you think I have some reciprocating disease?
Reciprocation is not a disease, it's a sign of life.

alanganes
11-08-2014, 08:40 AM
Nice! That's a cool little saw.

I rather like my old Keller hacksaw. They are fun to watch run, if nothing else.

I'd bet a more coarse blade would speed things up some. These guys are of course slow compared to a bandsaw, but not quite that slow. That one is nice and compact as well. Nice score for 50 bucks.

Does that use a standard hacksaw blade like you use in a hand hacksaw?

RichR
11-08-2014, 10:05 AM
It appears to have a hacksaw blade in it. It's 10 inches but I don't know if that's a standard size.

justanengineer
11-08-2014, 10:44 AM
Thats a beauty! I've been looking for one of the tiny benchtop models Craftsman/others made, would like a lil one to stick on a shelf of my pallet racking for occasional use.

alanganes
11-08-2014, 11:11 AM
It appears to have a hacksaw blade in it. It's 10 inches but I don't know if that's a standard size.

10" is a standard size:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lenox-10-in-24TPI-Hacksaw-Blade-10-Pack-20141V024HE/203488990

You should be able to get them anywhere. Mine uses the larger ones designed specifically for power hacksaws. They are a bit more expensive but last a very long time at my level of use.

Nice buy for 50 dollars, particularly if you do not have some sort of power cut-off device already.

RichR
11-08-2014, 11:25 AM
The only power cut-off device at my disposal is a 4" angle grinder with a cut-off wheel. I think the saw will be a much safer alternative.

EddyCurr
11-08-2014, 01:05 PM
At 25 minutes to cut this piece of 1" x 0.75" aluminum it's no speed demon, ...
The blade is probably too fine ...
http://i59.tinypic.com/23pr91.jpgBlade pitch or Teeth-Per-Inch is a big factor in the length of time for that cut.

Here is a link to a Starrett Blade Selection chart (http://www.starrett.com/docs/saw-resources/blade-selection-in-five-steps.pdf?sfvrsn=2). For 1" aluminum bar, my vote is
that a 6 TPI blade would reduce cut time significantly.

.

Axkiker
11-08-2014, 01:12 PM
I have a power hack which is just a little bit bigger than yours and LOVE it. It takes 12" blades. At first I couldnt figure out where in the world to find the blades. I ended up going to a local tool supply house that sells band saw blades. I had them take 10 foot of 1" wide 10 tpi blade and cut it into 12" sections. I then just drilled holes on each end so I could mount in the saw.

I use the saw all the time. Im guessing that a horizontal band saw is faster but you cant beat this little guy. You can stick whatever you want into the vice and hack away. As a test I cut through 2"x2" mild steel and it did it in what im guessing was under 5 min. Thats plenty fast for me.

The biggest benefit I find is that I can put literally anything in it and cut without worry. The other day I needed to cut some hardened material for a project. I simply chucked it up and started cutting. Yes, it ended up ruining that portion of the blade but it did make the cut. All I had to do to cut the other typical mild steel was to use another portion of the blade. If this was a bandsaw I would have needed to change blades or ruin an entire blade.

They do have IMO an advantage over band saws in the home shop. I wouldnt mind finding a larger unit for giggles

alanganes
11-08-2014, 03:09 PM
The only power cut-off device at my disposal is a 4" angle grinder with a cut-off wheel. I think the saw will be a much safer alternative.

That being the case, this will be a big upgrade.

A PH will not match the speed of a good bandsaw, but for a home shop that likely won't matter. The blades are cheap too, so that odd time you do an 'oops" and trash a blade it won't hurt as much as wrecking a good bandsaw blade.

I had both a standard 4x6 Taiwan bandsaw a Keller PH with a bit more capacity. I opted to keep the PH and sold the bandsaw, though the Keller was in better shape than the bandsaw. It is not quite as fast, but I don't regret the choice. The PH is more fun to watch cut, if nothing else.

dalee100
11-08-2014, 04:00 PM
Hi,

Excellent find! I have an old home-made 12" power hacksaw for my home shop. I keep threating to buy a little bandsaw, but it really does everything I need to with no fuss or muss.

Oh, and for that price....... You Suck!:cool:

Dalee

velocette
11-08-2014, 05:31 PM
The belts are shot and slip a bit and the saw really needs a good cleaning. I gave it a quick lube to try it out.
At 25 minutes to cut this piece of 1" x 0.75" aluminum it's no speed demon, but the cut is straight and clean.
The blade is probably too fine for aluminum which I'm sure didn't help:
http://i59.tinypic.com/23pr91.jpg

Hi RichR
Great find every home workshop needs one. Yes I to have the Reciprocating Disease got a double dose made one and was thrilled with it.
Then bought sad and neglected one and rebuilt it completely.
As for speed 85 strokes per minute is a good starting point.. Vee belts slipping are a nuisance on low RPM or Large Ratios.
Extra weight on the blade will help I use up to 5 kgs on thicker material.
Some aluminum alloys are curse to saw by clogging teeth and not clearing swarf properly.
Cutting oil and kerosene mix will help keep clean.
It looks like the blade is the same as a Hand Hacksaw so anything less than 18 Teeth Inch will be hard to find.
Cutting Thin wall tube in round or square section with a reciprocating saw is tricky and a fine tooth blade is a must.
Keep us informed with progress on this project.

Eric

sasquatch
11-08-2014, 06:18 PM
Very nice saw find. Looking at the teeth on that blade, they sure look damaged to me. No wonder it was slow.

Duffy
11-08-2014, 11:15 PM
I too built a PH using 12" blades. Starret blades are available up to 14 TPI and their Green Stripe brand are only about $1.00 each. My saw uses a Boston Gear 10/1 reducer with a 1/6 hp motor. I have the pulleys sized for about 100 SPM, and 8 lbs weight on the arm. The unit works very well, but I picked up a 4x6 bandsaw for what I considered a bargain and now the PH sits idle. I may reactivate it rather than pay $27.00 for a new bi-metal blade!
Yours was a VRY good score.

EddyCurr
11-09-2014, 12:29 AM
I too built a PH using 12" blades. Starret blades are available
up to 14 TPI and their Green Stripe brand are only about $1.00 each.For handsaws, the Starrett Bi-Metal Greenstripe blades are available from
14 to 32 TPI (in 12"). However, Starrett's Power Hacksaw blades are available
in 10 & 14 TPI (12") for Bi-Metal; 6 & 10 TPI are available in their Redstripe Solid
HSS series.

Starrett Power Hacksaw Blades (http://www.starrett.com/saws/saws-hand-tool-products/band-saw-blades/power-hacksaw-blades).

Probably not $1.00 a piece, however.

Edit: HSM advertiser Victor Machinery lists 12" PHS blades down to 10 TPI
at prices between $3.50 - $4.75. Starrett-brand PHS blades are over double
to almost triple this at MSC and elsewhere.

.

RichR
09-03-2015, 12:03 PM
Sorry to revive this old thread but I have a question about mounting the blade. Should the teeth point to the left, right, or doesn't matter? The saw
has no lifting mechanism so the teeth are always in contact. I copied the picture from the original post to show the direction of the flywheels
rotation. I just got some new blades and would prefer to install them in the correct orientation if there is one.
http://i60.tinypic.com/nedf1x.jpg

boslab
09-03-2015, 12:18 PM
I'm thinking forward and backward on a saw, as opposed to left and right but it's a small point indeed, for a small saw a pull stroke seems sensible, ie backward cutting, or I've been doing it wrong!
Mark

sarge41
09-03-2015, 12:19 PM
RichR: My little old atlas, which is similar in size and and type as your's, cuts on the return stroke which is to say the teeth are pointed toward the drive pulleys. Mine has a lift mechanism on the forward stroke which takes pressure off the blade. Good luck.
Sarge

RichR
09-03-2015, 12:23 PM
I'm thinking forward and backward on a saw, as opposed to left and right but it's a small point indeed, for a small saw a pull stroke seems sensible, ie backward cutting, or I've been doing it wrong!
Mark

You're right, forward or push and backward or pull make more sense. Relative to the orientation in the picture, left and right were the first things
that popped into my head. Thanks.

_Paul_
09-03-2015, 03:01 PM
Both my "Rapidor (https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRxqFQoTCIOn4MbF28cCFUsW2wodtdQMWA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.model-engineer.co.uk%2Fforums%2Fpostings.asp%3Fth%3D7659 7&psig=AFQjCNE__LeVC72iq1jo234lxMQiDZ4AQA&ust=1441393010565807)" and "Qualters & Smith (https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRxqFQoTCODRnfzF28cCFVJn2wodH1cKBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.timdixon.com%2Fs008.html&psig=AFQjCNH5HlI26gRlMBy9ncXIwFzbni6nJw&ust=1441393072894692)" donkey saws both cut on the "back" (return) stroke but both have rudimentary hydraulic cylinders to keep the blade up off the material on the forward stroke.

Paul

bruto
09-03-2015, 04:38 PM
As to direction, this can vary both with the saw and with the direction the wheel rotates. Many such saws cut on the back stroke, but I had a very old Star hacksaw (so old I gave it to a museum!) and it cut best on the push stroke, with the flywheel rotating correctly. Fortunately, that one had a direction marked on the crank wheel as the one shown here does. The counter-clockwise rotation of the crank as you face it, puts a downward push on the blade when it's pushed, and slightly unloads it on the return. On mine, the difference was pretty definite, and it cut surprisingly well.

boslab
09-03-2015, 04:49 PM
I spent an evening recently thinking about power hacksaws, it would seem to me that the ram and bull wheel arrangement on a shaper would be a good basis for a saw, adjustable stroke and position to use the blade better, only a thought as I generally use a cold saw like the rage thing, noisy but efficient, I don't use abrasive wheels at all these days, except 4 1/2", with slitting disk
I had a rapidor Manchester saw but blade lift never worked at all
That cut on the pull too
Mark

velocette
09-03-2015, 05:54 PM
Hi boslab
The idea of a ram and bull wheel is food for thought with the rapid return and slower cutting stroke.
bruto is correct that down force is exerted on the blade with the saw frame left side with counter clockwise rotation and teeth cutting on th travel left.

However with the teeth cutting on the right stroke it pulls the blade down works as well.
Reverse the rotation and then the blade will be lifted on both forward and backstrokes and rely on the weight of the saw frame to advance the cut..
On having a reversing switch on my "Hawkins" hacksaw all four alternatives were tried and the one that worked best on this machine was Counterclockwise cutting on the pull stroke.

Eric

Black_Moons
09-03-2015, 07:09 PM
Very nice saw find. Looking at the teeth on that blade, they sure look damaged to me. No wonder it was slow.

Agreed. I was going to say, ANY blade will be faster then the blade in there.. Looks like it has no tips on the teeth at all, and a few teeth missing.

bruto
09-03-2015, 11:01 PM
The best solution is probably to try it all ways. Since the crank wheel has an arrow on it, there really are only two ways you need to try. Put a nice fresh blade on, and get a piece of material into which you can make similar cuts, and try it both ways. Count the strokes to get through, and check for dulling of the blade.

The old Star hacksaw had a counterweight on it, which may have made a difference, and the cut was also on a tilt. As yours is flat and has no counterweight, it may behave differently. On the star, putting the blade the right way made an immediate and palpable difference.

http://oldtoolheaven.com/history/historyimg/powersawsm.jpg

Tundra Twin Track
09-04-2015, 12:50 AM
I had a 16" Omni (Import) that I bought new In 79 cut a lot of steel with that saw.

J Tiers
09-04-2015, 01:40 AM
Thats a beauty! I've been looking for one of the tiny benchtop models Craftsman/others made, would like a lil one to stick on a shelf of my pallet racking for occasional use.

You call them "tiny", but they are of substantial size. I think the Sears one was made by Covel, and I bought my FIL a Covel one. It is neither tiny nor lightweight. I'd not want to be planning to lift it onto the bench for a few casual cuts..... It takes up serious space, and it is heavy.

TGTool
09-04-2015, 10:15 AM
It's just the title of the thread that sends my mind off on a tangent every time I see it. Everyone's probably seen pictures of the bicycle frame with small generator that runs an appliance, or perhaps the pedal powered small grain mill. So when this thread shows up on the list I'm always picturing a "baby-powered" hacksaw. A little booster seat with a wiggly child arranged to do the cutting for you. One of those things that once the mind latches on I can't "un-see".

bruto
09-04-2015, 10:41 AM
You call them "tiny", but they are of substantial size. I think the Sears one was made by Covel, and I bought my FIL a Covel one. It is neither tiny nor lightweight. I'd not want to be planning to lift it onto the bench for a few casual cuts..... It takes up serious space, and it is heavy.

Sears rebranded a very small portable hacksaw called the "Handi-hack." It is indeed very small and light, and can be used with a standard hacksaw blade. If you do a google search for this, you'll find references to a Practical Machinist thread in which mine is shown.

justanengineer
09-04-2015, 10:46 AM
You call them "tiny", but they are of substantial size. I think the Sears one was made by Covel, and I bought my FIL a Covel one. It is neither tiny nor lightweight. I'd not want to be planning to lift it onto the bench for a few casual cuts..... It takes up serious space, and it is heavy.

Not sure but I thought Atlas made them along with the lathes, but the Sears/Craftsman ones I've seen are pretty tiny, only ~50 lbs compared to the 1k+ lb Keller my father has. Different horses for different courses tho, the lil ones only can cut ~6" of material whereas the big ones often can cut several feet across. Back in his teaching days my father cut a motorcycle engine in half with it as a DIY cutaway teaching aid.

J Tiers
09-04-2015, 11:00 AM
Sears rebranded a very small portable hacksaw called the "Handi-hack." It is indeed very small and light, and can be used with a standard hacksaw blade. If you do a google search for this, you'll find references to a Practical Machinist thread in which mine is shown.

Then thy had two, and yours is the smaller one. One is same as small Covel, and is substantial. About two feet long, all cast iron, at least 50lb, probably more, with motor.

May take a standard blade, but not "small and light"

CarlByrns
09-04-2015, 12:13 PM
Sears rebranded a very small portable hacksaw called the "Handi-hack." It is indeed very small and light, and can be used with a standard hacksaw blade. If you do a google search for this, you'll find references to a Practical Machinist thread in which mine is shown.

The Hand-I -Hack was built by the Lipe-Rollway Corp in Syracuse, NY- a few miles from here (the factory still stands. Bad section of town). I picked one up at an estate sale for $35. Worth every penny.

J Tiers
09-04-2015, 05:04 PM
The Covel style does not even look vaguely like a Hand-I-Hack, so there are two types for sure. Look up Sears Craftsman Hacksaw for images, there is an ugly gold pointed one in an early pic.

bruto
09-05-2015, 09:13 AM
I was told my Handi-hack was from Sears, but there is nothing visible on it, and it's possible I was mistaken, or the person who told me it was from Sears was mistaken. It's been a long time since I dealt with it, and there aren't many resources to call on.

In any case, if it was marketed by Sears it would appear to have been for a short time only.

Weston Bye
09-05-2015, 11:57 AM
It's just the title of the thread that sends my mind off on a tangent every time I see it. Everyone's probably seen pictures of the bicycle frame with small generator that runs an appliance, or perhaps the pedal powered small grain mill. So when this thread shows up on the list I'm always picturing a "baby-powered" hacksaw. A little booster seat with a wiggly child arranged to do the cutting for you. One of those things that once the mind latches on I can't "un-see".

I wondered if anyone else considered the child labor aspect of the title. Life was harder back then...

RichR
09-05-2015, 12:42 PM
It's just the title of the thread that sends my mind off on a tangent every time I see it. Everyone's probably seen pictures of the bicycle frame with small generator that runs an appliance, or perhaps the pedal powered small grain mill. So when this thread shows up on the list I'm always picturing a "baby-powered" hacksaw. A little booster seat with a wiggly child arranged to do the cutting for you. One of those things that once the mind latches on I can't "un-see".

I wondered if anyone else considered the child labor aspect of the title. Life was harder back then...

If that were the case I would have titled it:
Picked up a baby powered power hacksaw

Had it been ready to go, I would have titled it:
Picked up a baby powered power hacksaw complete with baby

J Tiers
09-05-2015, 01:58 PM
My only question was: "OK, you picked it up...... Have you put it down again yet?"

Weston Bye
09-05-2015, 02:41 PM
If that were the case I would have titled it:
Picked up a baby powered power hacksaw

Had it been ready to go, I would have titled it:
Picked up a baby powered power hacksaw complete with baby


The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug. - Mark Twain


----

RichR
09-05-2015, 05:02 PM
My only question was: "OK, you picked it up...... Have you put it down again yet?"

No, and boy are my arms tired. (Oops, wrong joke).

RichR
09-09-2015, 01:37 AM
So a couple of nights ago I needed to cut a length of 5/8" 316 SS rod. I installed a new 18 TPI bimetal blade with the teeth set to cut on the draw
stroke. It took 50 minutes. I attributed it to the size of the saw and the blade being too fine. Still beats doing it by hand. Well tonight I decided to
flip the blade around to cut another piece of the same material. The second I turned it on I could hear and see the difference. I could hear a
distinct cutting sound on every forward stroke that was not nearly as pronounced when when it was cutting on the draw stroke. I could also see
an occasional wisp of smoke coming off of the cut. This time the cut completed in a little over 5 minutes. She may be small but at this point I
feel the performance is satisfactory for anything I need to cut.

Axkiker
09-09-2015, 11:28 AM
So a couple of nights ago I needed to cut a length of 5/8" 316 SS rod. I installed a new 18 TPI bimetal blade with the teeth set to cut on the draw
stroke. It took 50 minutes. I attributed it to the size of the saw and the blade being too fine. Still beats doing it by hand. Well tonight I decided to
flip the blade around to cut another piece of the same material. The second I turned it on I could hear and see the difference. I could hear a
distinct cutting sound on every forward stroke that was not nearly as pronounced when when it was cutting on the draw stroke. I could also see
an occasional wisp of smoke coming off of the cut. This time the cut completed in a little over 5 minutes. She may be small but at this point I
feel the performance is satisfactory for anything I need to cut.

Yup made that same mistake myself.

Switch out to a 11tpi blade. I think you will be even happier. Ive used mine to blast through 3"+ round with no trouble. Maybe not as fast as a band saw but plenty fast for what I do.

CarlByrns
09-09-2015, 12:00 PM
My Lipe-Rollway cuts on the out (push) stroke and has an adjustment for down pressure. Your saw at one time probably had weights that hung off the end of the saw frame.

RichR
09-09-2015, 12:54 PM
Yup made that same mistake myself.

Switch out to a 11tpi blade. I think you will be even happier. Ive used mine to blast through 3"+ round with no trouble. Maybe not as fast as a band saw but plenty fast for what I do.

The only reference I could find to a 10 inch blade coarser than 18 TPI was here:
http://www.bipico.com/product-guide/hacksaw-blades-2/
which personally I think is a typo since no such animal shows up in their catalog.

RichR
09-09-2015, 01:01 PM
My Lipe-Rollway cuts on the out (push) stroke and has an adjustment for down pressure. Your saw at one time probably had weights that hung off the end of the saw frame.

You'd think since they took the time to put an arrow on the flywheel to show the proper rotation they would have followed through and put an
arrow on the frame to show the direction of cut. When I was cutting the first piece I did add a weight. One of those 4 inch parallel machinists clamps
onto the end of the frame.

Axkiker
09-09-2015, 02:54 PM
The only reference I could find to a 10 inch blade coarser than 18 TPI was here:
http://www.bipico.com/product-guide/hacksaw-blades-2/
which personally I think is a typo since no such animal shows up in their catalog.

Do what I did... Go to a local tool supply house that makes band saw blades. Buy however many feet and just ask them to cut into 10" lengths. Come home and drill your holes.

good to go with whatever tpi they sell.