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aostling
11-09-2014, 01:54 PM
I'm digitizing the photos I took in Wellington, shortly after I moved to New Zealand in 1972. This car was on a side street which no longer exists, perhaps off Taranaki St. I suspect it is an Austin 7, but I need confirmation. It looks like it must have been fun to drive.


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Austin_zps856232ca.jpg (http://s168.photobucket.com/user/aostling/media/Austin_zps856232ca.jpg.html)

The Artful Bodger
11-09-2014, 02:23 PM
My guess is a Morris 8, the telling point is the radiator mascot. It might be a 'bitza' as it has the 1938 pressed steel wheels but appears to have the earlier chromium radiator surround.

John

Tony Ennis
11-09-2014, 02:28 PM
Morris 8 also has 7 vents in the doghouse. Austin 7 has about a dozen.

ptjw7uk
11-09-2014, 02:40 PM
Looks like an MG TA Midget.
peter

RogerP
11-09-2014, 02:43 PM
Looks like an MG TA Midget.
peterNo, it's a Morris but there is a connection - MG stands for Morris Garages.

Here's a real MG (Wife and myself 50 years ago).

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b205/rogprov/web/MG-PB-1936_zps402851fc.jpg

MaxHeadRoom
11-09-2014, 03:28 PM
I am inclined to agree with A.B. on this one, I was familiar with most UK auto's of that era and don't recall ever seeing the exact thing.
I was working at the MG plant when the MGA was released.
An associate I was working with picked up one of the last TF's from the plant, all in individual parts, some assembly required!
I also used to pass the original Morris Garage on Wall st Oxford. Where they started out building bikes.
Max.

aostling
11-09-2014, 03:28 PM
My guess is a Morris 8, the telling point is the radiator mascot. It might be a 'bitza' as it has the 1938 pressed steel wheels but appears to have the earlier chromium radiator surround.

John

Thanks John, and others. I will label this as a 1938 Morris 8 Series II http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Eight#Morris_Eight_Series_II unless we get a different opinion.

I wish I could identify the street, but Google street views of this neighborhood don't help since almost all of those old houses have been replaced. It was only a few houses away from a Demolition Yard -- I never did figure out what that really was.



http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/DemolitionYard23_zps5ca9864d.jpg (http://s168.photobucket.com/user/aostling/media/DemolitionYard23_zps5ca9864d.jpg.html)

boslab
11-09-2014, 03:34 PM
It's got a Morris hood ornament but looks like a singer, like the sewing machines
Mark

awemawson
11-09-2014, 03:38 PM
Looks like an MG TA Midget.
peter

Nope - proportions are wrong, the TA is longer (ceased production due to the start of the war in 1939)

aostling
11-09-2014, 03:46 PM
It's got a Morris hood ornament but looks like a singer, like the sewing machines
Mark

I drove this 1936 Singer 9 all over the North and South Islands, during 1974-75. It was a "one-owner" car, passed on to my friend Graham Alderton from his grandfather who bought it new in Wanganui. Graham lent it to me while he was overseas for eighteen months.

There is a resemblance to the Morris 8, but this Singer was much more powerful (nine horsepower!) and it had an overhead camshaft.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Singer9_zpscbe5160d.jpg (http://s168.photobucket.com/user/aostling/media/Singer9_zpscbe5160d.jpg.html)

velocette
11-09-2014, 03:48 PM
Hi Again

It's a Morris 8 Toby Coupe a later model the earlier had spoked wheels

Eric

The Artful Bodger
11-09-2014, 04:08 PM
Although the car has pressed steel wheels it does appear to have the earlier plated radiator surround.

There were a number of marques of the time with this general style but this one is a Morris.

MaxHeadRoom
11-09-2014, 04:35 PM
Found it!
A 1934 Morris 8-40 2 seater 'Roadster' version introduced by Lord Nuffield as a specialty line.
No wonder I didn't recognize it, it was also known as the Australian. For export.
Max.

aostling
11-09-2014, 04:42 PM
Found it!
A 1934 Morris 8-40 2 seater 'Roadster' version introduced by Lord Nuffield as a specialty line.
No wonder I didn't recognize it, it was also known as the Australian. For export.
Max.

Yes, that settles it. Here is a link: http://bmcexperience.com.au/bmce-issue6/morris-8-40.html

MaxHeadRoom
11-09-2014, 04:46 PM
I may have seen it with out knowing, I was doing some work at the factory at Cowley and in one building they had a version of all the Morris Marques, in pristine condition, they had never been on the road!.
Max.

aostling
11-11-2014, 02:18 PM
I'll bump this thread, hoping somebody can identify this other mystery car; it was on a street in Wellington in 1973. The hood ornament is some sort of bird, an eagle or hawk perhaps, with spread wings.


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/mysterycar_zps7284b33d.jpg (http://s168.photobucket.com/user/aostling/media/mysterycar_zps7284b33d.jpg.html)

The Artful Bodger
11-11-2014, 02:23 PM
Austin! It looks small enough to be an Austin 7 and the painted grill indicates a late model, 1937 or there abouts, maybe.

MaxHeadRoom
11-11-2014, 02:50 PM
Looks like one version of the Wolsley emblem.
Max.

aostling
11-11-2014, 03:00 PM
Austin! It looks small enough to be an Austin 7 and the painted grill indicates a late model, 1937 or there abouts ...

John,

I knew I'd get an answer, but thought it might take more time than this!

One more thing: these CitroŽns were not uncommon on the streets of Wellington in the early 1970s. I'm not sure of the exact model, but they were front-wheel drive, or traction avant. How did this French car get an import license in those days?

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Citroens_zpse2e8080f.jpg (http://s168.photobucket.com/user/aostling/media/Citroens_zpse2e8080f.jpg.html)

velocette
11-11-2014, 03:39 PM
Hi Allan
The Earlier model Citreons Were available through the local dealer-importer. You had to have access to "Overseas Funds" I.E. money that you had invested overseas could be generated by the sale of goods that you produced in New Zealand and exported. If you were fortunate enough to have overseas assets then you could buy-import a new car keep it for I believe was two years then you could sell it for what you had paid for it.
As for the car under a sheet it is an Austin 12 or 14 or 16 model This is a prewar model. They all looked very similar not sure if the 14 and 16 had the same body and the model was defined by the motor capacity.

Eric

aostling
11-11-2014, 04:21 PM
As for the car under a sheet it is an Austin 12 or 14 or 16 model This is a prewar model. They all looked very similar not sure if the 14 and 16 had the same body and the model was defined by the motor capacity.

Eric

Thanks Eric. I assume that like the Austin 7 (and the Singer 9), the Austin 12 was designated by its "rated horsepower," a reduced figure used to ascertain the license fee. One hopes they made a bit more power than that.

RogerP
11-11-2014, 04:45 PM
Thanks Eric. I assume that like the Austin 7 (and the Singer 9), the Austin 12 was designated by its "rated horsepower," a reduced figure used to ascertain the license fee. One hopes they made a bit more power than that.... that about sums it up but for those who really want the nitty-gritty there's a long and detailed explanation here (scroll down a couple of pages)....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsepower

Georgineer
11-11-2014, 05:06 PM
Looks like one version of the Wolsley emblem.
Max.

All the Wolseleys I know of had an illuminated badge set into the grille itself. I was told that it was the only make of car which had an illuminated badge.

George

MaxHeadRoom
11-11-2014, 05:14 PM
All the Wolseleys I know of had an illuminated badge set into the grille itself.

George

You could be right there, I remember it was the car of choice for a few police forces in the UK!.
Max.

aostling
11-11-2014, 05:40 PM
Here's a real MG (Wife and myself 50 years ago).



That town looks familiar. Did you live in Devon?

Peter S
11-11-2014, 05:43 PM
. How did this French car get an import license in those days

Citroen had a factory at Slough in England from the 1920's and they avoided British import tax by doing assembly and adding local content. This also allowed them to export to Commonwealth countries without being penalised.

Note also the right hand steering position ex-Slough. However I have read that Citroen in France may also have offered right hand steering.

(John Pressnell Citroen Traction Avant).

I would say the "Light Fifteen" was the most popular model in NZ, they are still not hard to find. I reckon that is the model seen in the photos, my guess is 1950's models. (Non-expert opinion, open to correction :)).

aostling
11-11-2014, 06:10 PM
I would say the "Light Fifteen" was the most popular model in NZ, they are still not hard to find.

Peter,

Parts might be a problem. I wonder if that giant wrecking yard at Horopito is still in existence. That is where I got a replacement for the broken steering arm on my Singer Nine.

When I stayed at a Westport backpackers in 1995 the owner showed me the 1955 Dodge Kingsway he had in his garage. He bought it after the Korean War had raised the price of wool and deerskin to "a pound a pound." That's one way to get overseas funds.

Lew Hartswick
11-11-2014, 10:46 PM
No, it's a Morris but there is a connection - MG stands for Morris Garages.

Here's a real MG (Wife and myself 50 years ago).


Ah a TD. I never liked the TF headlights just don't belong imbedded in the fenders. :-)
...lew...

MaxHeadRoom
11-11-2014, 11:40 PM
I would say the "Light Fifteen" was the most popular model in NZ, they are still not hard to find. I reckon that is the model seen in the photos, my guess is 1950's models. (Non-expert opinion, open to correction :)).

The first car my brother owned was a 1948 Light Fifteen.
Had brass wheel nuts that stripped easily!
Max.