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View Full Version : Jaws for a T de G Chuck



John Buffum
11-20-2014, 09:10 PM
I have a 7.5" TdeG chuck. Two piece jaws. The second piece is missing. Emailed TdeG, but, as I'm not a business, ordering 1,000 of them, I'm not worth a reply.

Well, will make 'em. S-7 tool steel. Next door neighbor will harden and draw.

Any sage advice?

JCHannum
11-20-2014, 09:24 PM
If you are referring to the top jaws, they should be a standard item, available from most suppliers. Check dimensions and mounting type.

http://www.gts-tools.com/lathe-chuck-jaws.html

If you are making, why not make soft jaws that can be altered to fit specific workholding requirements? Make several sets at one time so you will have spares on hand when needed. The ability to use soft jaws is the major advantage of the two piece chuck jaw.

becksmachine
11-22-2014, 07:39 AM
I have a 7.5" TdeG chuck. Two piece jaws. The second piece is missing. Emailed TdeG, but, as I'm not a business, ordering 1,000 of them, I'm not worth a reply.

Well, will make 'em. S-7 tool steel. Next door neighbor will harden and draw.

Any sage advice?

A somewhat confusing post, it implies "TdeG as some kind of brand name?

I think what you are referring to is T & G, the acronym for "tongue and groove" which is the style of the top jaw and how it attaches to the master jaw, with two cap screws (usually socket head) and a tongue and groove arrangement to center it.

If this is the case, top jaws of all descriptions are readily available.

Dave

Black Forest
11-22-2014, 08:11 AM
A somewhat confusing post, it implies "TdeG as some kind of brand name?

I think what you are referring to is T & G, the acronym for "tongue and groove" which is the style of the top jaw and how it attaches to the master jaw, with two cap screws (usually socket head) and a tongue and groove arrangement to center it.

If this is the case, top jaws of all descriptions are readily available.

Dave


Dave, TdeG is a brand name. They make lathe chucks among other tools. TALLERES DE GUERNICA is the actual name of the company.

John Buffum
11-22-2014, 08:15 AM
T de G refers to a factory in Spain, in Guernica.

No, they are not standard size. It's all proprietary. Like IBM in the 1970's. What did Maxwell Smart say? "Missed it by THAT much!" It's just enough off in most dimensions you can't use anyone else's but theirs. No telling how old it is. No mfg date. Maybe those of recent mfr are standard.

Went on MSC and McMaster. I could buy a whole Bison 3-jaw 8" chuck for what they want just for jaws! No!

Well, another machinist's challenge.

becksmachine
11-22-2014, 12:58 PM
T de G refers to a factory in Spain, in Guernica.

No, they are not standard size. It's all proprietary. Like IBM in the 1970's. What did Maxwell Smart say? "Missed it by THAT much!" It's just enough off in most dimensions you can't use anyone else's but theirs. No telling how old it is. No mfg date. Maybe those of recent mfr are standard.

Went on MSC and McMaster. I could buy a whole Bison 3-jaw 8" chuck for what they want just for jaws! No!

Well, another machinist's challenge.

Well crap, shows how much I know. :o

Dave

Arthur.Marks
11-22-2014, 04:03 PM
John,
From your previous thread, I gathered that they use a tongue + groove system, even if it does not match what you are finding. By far the vast majority of tongue and groove jaws are made to "American Standard Tongue and Groove (http://www.abbottworkholding.com/chuck-jaws-jaw-nuts/american-standard-tongue-groove-jaws)" dimensions; however, there is a much more uncommon "Metric Tongue and Groove (http://www.abbottworkholding.com/chuck-jaws-jaw-nuts/metric-tongue-groove-jaws)" standard. You might want to confirm they don't match those spec's either before declaring them fully proprietary.

Ultimately I see it as being economical to make soft top jaws yourself. The less common sizes can cost surprisingly much for a set of three. Sounds like you're trying to make hard, master top jaws, though. Those will benefit from much higher precision, so take that into account. Do you have a surface grinder?

John Buffum
11-22-2014, 04:47 PM
Surface grinder. Check. Made the one in, I think, Home Shop Machinist. I've used it to true chucks. Works wonderfully.

Yes to hard jaws. Soft jaws are great for awhile, then, you must re-true.

I'll check out the metric standard, tho, if MSC's prices are any indication, well, I've bot CARS for less than that!

Black Forest
11-22-2014, 05:17 PM
What are the dimensions and I will check them against my metric jaws?

Arthur.Marks
11-22-2014, 05:20 PM
Haha :) I hear you on the cost element. I say go for it then! You've got the tools + heat treat resource to make them, and it will be a worthwhile project. I'd love to see the finished product too if you would keep the forum updated of your progress.

iMisspell
11-22-2014, 05:22 PM
If the bolt holes on your masters are the same (or maybe close enough) can you modify your masters to fit a standard jaw ?
OR
Make an adapter(s) ?

Acouple years ago i was giving a few sets/blanks of soft jaws from a pneumatic chuck which was no longer being used. The bolt hole pattern was the same but the "socket" was completely different so i made these adapters.

Left is what seats to my master, middle is what the jaws seat on, right just a profile shot.
http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a570/iMisspell/IMG_20141122_171149_zpsc07p6u8z.jpg


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