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View Full Version : Drill-press table-lift



Yairfe
11-23-2014, 04:14 AM
I will let this vid speak for itself


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxMgBopH01g

Paul Alciatore
11-23-2014, 04:21 AM
Kinda slow, but neat.

How about the lock down? I guess you still have to unlock and lock it manually.

jhovel
11-23-2014, 05:33 AM
Very nice! I like the idea. Might have to make a version for my floor pedestal drill. It has a very heavy table and I've already fitted a 23kg counterweight to stop it falling too easily....

_Paul_
11-23-2014, 06:50 AM
Great idea and use of available components
Nice work

Paul

dalee100
11-23-2014, 08:45 AM
Hi,

Excellent! Works very smoothly too. What did you use for the 12V power supply?

As an aside, I like your choice of background music.

Dalee

JoeLee
11-23-2014, 09:19 AM
Nice idea, but looks if it were me I would try to move the motor in a little closer to avoid the overhang. I've never found that I have to move my DP table more than a couple inches in either direction. I also was wondering about locking the table, manually I guess.

JL................

feets
11-23-2014, 09:30 AM
Nice answer using on-hand parts.

Too much of that squiggly writing on the screen though. :D

Yairfe
11-23-2014, 10:11 AM
Thank you guys for your comments!


Hi,

What did you use for the 12V power supply?

As an aside, I like your choice of background music.

Dalee
A 220 to 12v 1.25A from an electronic device (a printer? a charger? don't remember).
All credits for the film editing and music go to my son, Ido.


Nice idea, but looks if it were me I would try to move the motor in a little closer to avoid the overhang. I've never found that I have to move my DP table more than a couple inches in either direction. I also was wondering about locking the table, manually I guess.

JL................

You are probably right about making the coupling shorter, though not much of a overhang problem because the tiny motor weighs only a few grams.



Kinda slow, but neat.

How about the lock down? I guess you still have to unlock and lock it manually.

Yes, manually

planeman
11-23-2014, 11:09 AM
Nice solution! I made a drill press table lift from a trailer jack bought from Harbor Freight. It is one that has the crank on the side instead of the top. Added an extension on the top and a base to sit on top of the dill press base. The lift sits between the drill press base and the bottom of the table. The lift is easily removable by lifting out should I need to drop the table really low. Works like a charm!

Duffy
11-23-2014, 11:18 PM
If the DP table already has a "handraulic" rack and pinion, then a 3/8" socket adapter fastened to the stub shaft can be driven by a cordless drill. I us an old 9.6V Makita and it works a treat.

CCWKen
11-23-2014, 11:50 PM
I'm not seeing a video. Is it on YouTube?

schor
11-23-2014, 11:58 PM
Nice job.

I built one too. Different but does the job. Mine is slow also, but really you don't need speed, usually your just adjusting for a new drill bit length.


http://youtu.be/novc-e_-XVo

oldtiffie
11-24-2014, 12:34 AM
I just put my left hand (palm up) under the table and push upwards while using my right hand to use the handle for the rack and pinion - reverse is pretty simple too.

Its as original 40+ years ago - and it still works fine.

I couldn't see a need to change it for "efficiency" and work for the sake of work is not in my lexicon.

If I was to use anything to assist with raising and lowering the table I'd probably use an air strut from a car.

Yairfe
11-24-2014, 02:59 AM
I'm not seeing a video. Is it on YouTube?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxMgBopH01g

vpt
11-24-2014, 07:43 AM
I broke that plastic handle off my built in hand crank lift awhile ago and have been thinking I want a power.

alanganes
11-24-2014, 10:31 AM
I just put my left hand (palm up) under the table and push upwards while using my right hand to use the handle for the rack and pinion - reverse is pretty simple too.

Its as original 40+ years ago - and it still works fine.

I couldn't see a need to change it for "efficiency" and work for the sake of work is not in my lexicon.

If I was to use anything to assist with raising and lowering the table I'd probably use an air strut from a car.

I'm not sure that either of these is "work for the sake of work", I don't think these DP's had a rack and pinion for changing the table height. You will note that the leadscrew that lifts the tables is an add-on in both instances.

I had one with that "feature", there was only the clamp that fixed the position of the table. When you loosened the clamp, the table wanted to just drop to the floor. You had to manually support it and move it to the desired height. Pretty inconvenient and a hassle to position precisely. I don't have that DP any more...

Beyond that, the fact that the bevel gear drive that Yairfe used on his came from a chicken cooker makes me smile for some reason.

schor
11-25-2014, 09:24 AM
I'm not sure that either of these is "work for the sake of work", I don't think these DP's had a rack and pinion for changing the table height. You will note that the leadscrew that lifts the tables is an add-on in both instances.

I had one with that "feature", there was only the clamp that fixed the position of the table. When you loosened the clamp, the table wanted to just drop to the floor. You had to manually support it and move it to the desired height. Pretty inconvenient and a hassle to position precisely. I don't have that DP any more...

Beyond that, the fact that the bevel gear drive that Yairfe used on his came from a chicken cooker makes me smile for some reason.

My press never came with a rack and pinion. Many of the older presses did not come with one. Once you put a 25lbvise on the table then it gets pretty hard to raise and lower the table.

Alistair Hosie
11-25-2014, 09:49 AM
I have a very big Elliot gered head drill press and it is a heavy lift to deal with especially for me.This is a welcome idea speed for me is not a problem.I figure I will work something out.Thanks for this thread Alistair

Yairfe
11-25-2014, 12:59 PM
My press never came with a rack and pinion.

Mine either.

oldtiffie
11-25-2014, 09:32 PM
Mine sure did - I wouldn't have bought it (new - Taiwanese) unless it had a rack and pinion on it.

If I wanted to make lifting/lowering easier or required I'd probably use a garage/car jack with a "rod" or some such to "fill in the gap and perhaps something simple and effective at the lower end - say on or over the drill base.

But as I have a spare (air over hydraulic") cylinder for my engine hoist, I'd use combined and/or separate air and hydraulics.

http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/J033

The same principle/s could be used to raise/lower a shop press.

J Tiers
11-25-2014, 10:45 PM
A leadscrew, a nut, and a gearbox to drive it.... Two collars , one with gearbox, one with nut. One under head, one under table. Leadscrew can be cheap and totally inaccurate.

Thats what the big Atlas-Clausing 1800 came with. Lifts table, or head, depending on what you want.

oldtiffie
11-26-2014, 01:49 AM
It is always possible to fit an eye-bolt to both the under-side of the drill head and the upper face of the table arm, fit a small cheap block and tackle between the eye-bolts - and away ya go - raise/lower effort reduced as is the possibility of the table and arm dropping when the table arm clamp is loosened - so manual effort is reduced and table drop risk/drop all but eliminated as is the OH&S issue/s.

All with good effect with minimum time, effort and cost.

wern
11-26-2014, 02:53 PM
When I bought my first drill pres in the late 70' I looked at the British Meddings range and the then
Taiwanese equivalent, I found the British machines far superior in fit between the quill and head casting,
but also more expensive and without rack feed to the table.
I decided to buy the Meddings and arranged a pulley system on the coulomb and hung bits of lead until
it would balance the weight of the table plus vise, then I melted the lead in a tin can, to make a nice round counter weight, it works like a charm.
I later got another later model Meddings and did the same to it although I must say the quality was not the same as the previous model.
It is such a pity the British machine industry went from brilliant to mediocre to gone.

Werner