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View Full Version : Dissadvantages of being pro and homeshop.



Old Hat
11-28-2014, 12:29 PM
Problem solving.
It's the spice of life at work. Or at least for me it is.
If there are no problems, then it's called "Production".
Good for the bottom line. Good for learning efficiency and discapline.
Very bad for the creative juices, and just plain boring as he!!.

In the company I work for, most of the problems are caused by one group.
And solved by another group, so I have no burden of guilt, and anything
I can get going better is a pluss. Further; I face frustration much of the time
but frustration is better than bordom any day.

THE TROUBLE IS THE BURNOUT.
We've broken into several new lines of work that are loading up the shop
with problem solving. I personally have the added burden of being.........
........ on the outside of the inner circle here. I wouldn't want to be in that circle anyway,
but the constant drain of the annimocities, and the running conflicts between these factions
takes it's toll big time.
==============

There in, is the problem!
I'm on 5 weeks now of squandering my home~time on the three projects I'd realy like to
be able to put the finishing touches on. If it was just 'do-it' that'd be one thing.........
but these three projects need some problem solving.
When I'm home, I'm just plain out of gass for problem solving.
I'd rather sit around with family, of furry friends, check the forums. Watch some cool history program
or catch up on Black List........ or .... or.

Necessity dunt help either because it aint! It is NOT a necessity, because all I have to do
is stay after school, and do any little thing with greater ease at work, than I would at home.
If I was an engineer or a pilot, I'd be chomping at the bit to get to it at home, No?

Woe is me. I got all day and haven't touched my toys yet.:(

flylo
11-28-2014, 12:42 PM
If your job is also your hobby you need a different hobby. I've seen it in airline captians to mechanics to woodworkers. If you do it all day for pay why would you want to do it on your time.

Black Forest
11-28-2014, 12:49 PM
I don't have a problem at all believing you are on the outs with the inner circle if you interact with the people at work in the same way as you post here! Now I am only speaking for myself of course but these threads you start are strange. In all my years I have never read such crap!

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 12:54 PM
If you do it all day for pay why would you want to do it on your time.

Different discaplines mostly.
At work I use recent technology, and have to allow for others and their input.
At home I use antique techology, and I use it how~ever it feels right.

And because I was born this way! Just luv Metal.
Once home, it's realy more of an excersise in industrial anthropollogy.
It's winter so boats (now that's a hobby) are {on ice} so to speak.
So.........

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 01:00 PM
In all my years I have never read such crap!

Slowly getting a picture of you.... accuarcy not withstanding, coming from you.. the line above.
Well, it's probably a good thing we're a half a world appart. I think we could do a pretty friction weld No?;)

PS, I knew there was no chance of be'n palls:eek: when Ya dissed "The Villian".
how can ya like a guy who can't stand "The Villian"?
http://images.amcnetworks.com/blogs.amctv.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/kirk-douglass-villain.gif

Black Forest
11-28-2014, 01:06 PM
Slowly getting a picture of you.... accuarcy not withstanding, coming from you.. the line above.
Well, it's probably a good thing we're a half a world appart. I think we could do a pretty friction weld No?;)

No because I wouldn't spend one second around somebody like you.

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 01:13 PM
Odd, why even read my chit then? huh?

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 01:16 PM
Wow, it's work'n.
I'm start'n ta wanna go work on my old Miller Selenium rectified beauty.!
Wadd-da-ya-know!:p

CarlByrns
11-28-2014, 01:49 PM
If you do it all day for pay why would you want to do it on your time.

Why wouldn't you? A good friend of mine is a high-end cabinet maker who works for someone all day and himself at night. His two-car garage shop has netted him north of $250K (it started as a hobby) doing the kind of woodwork his employer doesn't. His employer is well aware of the home shop- as long as the two businesses doesn't compete for the same market, he's cool with it.

If you have the talent, the passion, and the tools, it's not work.

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 01:53 PM
Why wouldn't you? A good friend of mine is a high-end cabinet maker who works for someone all day and himself at night. His two-car garage shop has netted him north of $250K (it started as a hobby) doing the kind of woodwork his employer doesn't. His employer is well aware of the home shop- as long as the two businesses doesn't compete for the same market, he's cool with it.

If you have the talent, the passion, and the tools, it's not work.

+1 . . .

flylo
11-28-2014, 02:07 PM
He doesn't have a hobby, he has a 2nd job, totally different thing.


Why wouldn't you? A good friend of mine is a high-end cabinet maker who works for someone all day and himself at night. His two-car garage shop has netted him north of $250K (it started as a hobby) doing the kind of woodwork his employer doesn't. His employer is well aware of the home shop- as long as the two businesses doesn't compete for the same market, he's cool with it.

If you have the talent, the passion, and the tools, it's not work.

I m

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 02:22 PM
Time for more Pi, no whip cream. Just Pi.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iUh_CSjaSw

Mike Amick
11-28-2014, 02:32 PM
Have to hand it to ya Old Hat .. your skin has definitely thickened .. good for you.

Mike A

Glug
11-28-2014, 02:35 PM
When I'm home, I'm just plain out of gass for problem solving.
I'd rather sit around with family, of furry friends, check the forums. Watch some cool history program
or catch up on Black List........ or .... or.

If Brian Rupnow would hurry up and put a webcam on his mill, we could watch him do his thing. ;)

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 04:16 PM
3:13pm, here and I have done nothing but lay around and nap with the Cats.
It's the deep purring I think. Haven't got a chance.

John Stevenson
11-28-2014, 04:31 PM
My heart bleeds for you...........................................

garyhlucas
11-28-2014, 04:32 PM
Old Hat,
Ever thought maybe you are a little depressed? I found myself working hard all day but evenings and weekends I couldn't seem to start or finish anything. Went on for a couple of years that way, and finally decided I needed to change something so I saw a shrink. I hadn't been getting along well with my wife either. It helped me a lot, and I take a small amount of an antidepressant now. I found renewed energy and joy in doing that I hadn't felt in years.

Then once I was sure that my unhappiness with the idiots I was working for was not due to me being depressed, I found a new job that I am really enjoying despite working lots of hours. I also learned just how little respect I got at my old job. I stayed on for a couple of extra weeks to finish a project and they stiffed me completely out of my year end bonus. After ten years working there they hired my replacement at $10,000 more than they were paying me. I am also in a position now to exact some payback. Only now that's just a bonus on top of everything else.

George Seal
11-28-2014, 04:58 PM
Phil
if loving on the cat makes you happy then go for it

My workshop is used to burn up the rest of my life

in the shop I read, watch y tube, piddle or what ever. I don't force myself to do metal work because your mind may not be with it and you get hurt

flylo
11-28-2014, 05:10 PM
I should have added IMHO to my post. I always loved to work, came in early & left late, got tons done, thrived on stress & problem solving. Really hated dealing with employees & their petty bickering, lack of a decent work ethic & just being fake in general. My relief was flying & the older the better as finding the right sequence where an engine 20+ years older than me with no impulse couplers on the mags will start on he first pull of the blade still brings a smile. Flying has brought my most peaceful moment & my most stressful. Old Hat I don't always agree with you but I do respect your straight forward honesty & commend you for that. Hope you enjoyed the nap.:p

Doozer
11-28-2014, 05:56 PM
I first thought Old Hat was way out there,
but I began to appreciate his prospective on things.
He has a lot of determination and creative ideas.
Phil would be welcome in my shop, just no caffeine for him.
A beer maybe.
-Doozer

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 05:58 PM
My relief was flying & the older the better as finding the right sequence where an engine 20+ years older than me with no impulse couplers on the mags will start on he first pull of the blade still brings a smile. Flying has brought my most peaceful moment & my most stressful.

I have flight envie.
In the late 70s a small rural airfield here would for a fee, give you the oppotunity to complete ONE entire flight
with a trainer right there to fill in any gaps. All you had to do was spend a half hour with the trainer, and answer
a pretty tuff buch of questions, which revealed whether you had any biZness piloting a plane.

I read the Pilot's Handbook I bought at the mall, cover to cover, and inside out to prepair.
Pluss my uncle was a Navy flight trainer & he and my Dad (who could fly) had told me quite a bit over my childhood.
I tell you now It was one of the highest points in my life. I did it ALL, I did get barked at, to get er up on take-off.
But all the rest was just grand beyong grand. He did say he didn't usually allow as steep of banking like I was doing
when instucted to, but he could tell I was responding fine to the plane, just don't go any farther.
It was only about 15F outside and I had to cross over I94 to land, and he warned it would feel like crossing
a two track rail-crossing, so just stay steady, and the landing was surprisingly good.
end of story, but I GOT TO DO IT ONCE ! I'm in full understanding of your love fore it.



I Old Hat I don't always agree with you but I do respect your straight forward honesty & commend you for that. Hope you enjoyed the nap.:p

Thanks!
Beyond morallity, safety, and metal working fundamentals, I find that the constant learning
from others, and from my own experimentation, brings about a new position, where I today....
....don't fully agree with me 4 months ago.
Go figure.

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 06:00 PM
I first thought Old Hat was way out there,
but I began to appreciate his prospective on things.
He has a lot of determination and creative ideas.
Phil would be welcome in my shop, just no caffeine for him.
A beer maybe.
-Doozer

Many humble Thanks! ...

oldtiffie
11-28-2014, 06:39 PM
Have to hand it to ya Old Hat .. your skin has definitely thickened .. good for you.

Mike A

I get the impression that old hat is on the inside of the tent pi$$ing out and his detractors are on the outside trying to pi$$ in.

Keep it up oh - you are doing fine.

PStechPaul
11-28-2014, 06:59 PM
For about as long as I can remember, my day jobs have been doing what I enjoyed doing, mostly electronic repair, modification, and design. Most of my frustration has been with (IMHO) unreasonable and pompously clueless bosses who imposed restrictions and deadlines, and refused to spend any money for equipment that would eventually result in a better product at lower cost. I've always been creative and have been able to design and build things using my imagination and various parts and a sort of intuition, or "knack". Mostly this was in the field of electronics and related computer programming, but I also made things out of wood and metal, using crude hand tools and a 1/4" electric drill.

I saw a sign once that an engineer's passion was to "look for problems", and of course then find creative ways to analyze and solve them, much like a detective. This process has resulted in much learning and the joy of engineering a solution. In my machine shop classes, I find that I am much less inspired to meet specified tolerances (MILTFP), and rather looked at ways to improve the design - IOW, function over form. When doing machining, at which I have much less experience and formal education, I collect enough information to determine a workable approach, but I like to experiment with things like shape of the cutter, speeds, feeds, lubes, and materials. Some of my ideas have been rather ridiculous and unworkable, but have not resulted in any injury or irreparable damage, and have instead contributed to my experience. My childhood hero, Edison, was supposed to have said that there was no shame in having 99 failures before success, because it showed 99 ways that would not work, and that was valuable information. If he had given up after one or two tries, he would never have succeeded, and someone else with more tenacity would have come up with something that worked.

Old Hat, don't let a few naysayers put a crimp in your style. I find most of your posts interesting and perhaps even enjoyable (to an engineer) because of the challenge they present in terms of deciphering your meaning from your unusual wording and grammatical inconsistencies. ;)

flylo
11-28-2014, 08:01 PM
Old Hat, I live 4 miles from I-94 & you need to learn how to flybecause I think your like me & never quit learning. A day is wasted if I don't learn something & your always learning as a pilot. You can be great but there's always something new to learn. IMHO start with a classic old hand propped taildragger, I sold my 1938 Taylorcraft to a guy in Brazil. Here's a link to some pics of her
http://gallery.taylorcraft.org/main.php?g2_view=cart.ViewCart&g2_itemId=2985&g2_GALLERYSID=a7fac47348c528b247caea00f5d4af4f
She was one of the 2 best pre-wars & the most original. I really mis flying her & am going to sell the Bonanza. I have an ultrlight & powered parachute that I can just step into. But I have a project you need, an amfib Tcraft on steroids, all new with 160HP Lyc B2B engine, twin 40 gallon wing tanks built by Altry Dodge in Alaska, it's going to be a rocket as it's 100 hp over what most stock ones had but has all the airframe mods to handle it & is in the homebuilt exp catagory. I had it ready to cover except the wings when I broke my back.

Old Hat
11-28-2014, 08:33 PM
Broke your Back! Damn you realy 'git'er-done don't you.

I'm falling appart a little at a time, still end up in the same place,
but I can adjust to it as I go. Hoping my tool-welding progresses
fast enuff to take me the distance once I'm too Old for a large Bar.

In reality yer never "too Old for a large Bar", but management $hits it's self
because saddly; the absence of frantic activity, is mistaken for reduced productivity.

Cheers thO'

danlb
11-28-2014, 11:54 PM
Old Hat, I live 4 miles from I-94 & you need to learn how to fly because I think your like me & never quit learning.

Now why would you want to suggest learning to fly to a guy who eschews formulas and checklists and procedures? If I understand correctly, the death rate was very high in the early days of aviation when everyone flew by the seat of their pants. I would not wish such a fate on Old Hat.

To speak to the thread... :)

There are a lot of machinists who are engineers of one form or another. I'm a retired software engineer. I found that working with metal fills a void. I like the challenge of working on concrete things.

Maybe oldhat should go the other way and learn to program.

Dan

tyrone shewlaces
11-29-2014, 12:51 AM
I'm falling appart a little at a time,

I've come to realize that I apparently fell apart long ago, and I can only feel it now at my age.
I guess I was too young to know I ever hurt myself before. Wisdom is painful.
Is that what they meant with the phrase "The truth hurts"?
I didn't think they meant physically.

Well...now I know.
Dangit.

Old Hat
11-29-2014, 06:57 AM
Now why would you want to suggest learning to fly to a guy who eschews formulas and checklists and procedures? If I understand correctly, the death rate was very high in the early days of aviation when everyone flew by the seat of their pants. I would not wish such a fate on Old Hat.

To speak to the thread... :)

There are a lot of machinists who are engineers of one form or another. I'm a retired software engineer. I found that working with metal fills a void. I like the challenge of working on concrete things.

Maybe oldhat should go the other way and learn to program.

Dan

I've written protocall, and procedures. They have there place.
And what a Pilot does before flying is exactly that a machinist should do.
BUT, you haven't taken off, Metal working, untill it's just You and the Metal.
Flight plan yes, but YOU write it, and it's just a plan.
=====================
Here's the hobby of my dreams.
I'd start tomorrow if I'd have handled money better in life.
But ..........
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/73-TUGBOAT-GROUPER-1912-/261672153662?pt=Other_Boats&hash=item3cece0323e&vxp=mtr

Punkinhead
11-29-2014, 07:11 AM
If your job is also your hobby you need a different hobby. I've seen it in airline captians to mechanics to woodworkers. If you do it all day for pay why would you want to do it on your time.I know a lot of airline captains that love to fly on their days off - they spend their work hours as a glorified bus driver and on their off time they get to fly interesting stuff like old Cubs, aerobatics, warbirds, etc. I know cabinet makers who like to build furniture at home because even though all the cabinets they build are slightly different, in the end they're just boxes with the same basic structure. On the weekends they can do marquetry, steam bending, hand cut dovetails, etc. Many of the machinists I know have home shops because they spend all week making parts to print with no knowledge of how those parts work in the final assembly and no ability to offer suggestions for improvements. On the weekends they build custom sand buggies, gunsmithing, restore motorcycles, etc.

CarlByrns
11-29-2014, 07:33 AM
He doesn't have a hobby, he has a 2nd job, totally different thing.

Not really- he has a hobby that pays hims well. His workload is whatever he wants it to be, there are no deadlines.

flylo
11-29-2014, 07:43 AM
I know this also, it depends on the person. I also know guys who need to do something totally different on their time off, guess it depends on if they love their jod or not. Airline captians that I know fly old classocs or aerobatics not anything they have to talk to the tower or flight service as in their day job, but I'm sure some do. Old Hat you'll enjoy this, I bought a truck in Wisconcin Rapids & my buddy flew the Bonanza back to Dowagiac,Mi C91 in 28 minutes, took me 5 hours by truck. On the way over we're at 10,500 & South Bend control advises us that an Airbus 330 will cross over us at just over 2000' on decent for O'Hare, boy that thing was huge & was close enough we never felt any wake at all.

Old Hat
11-29-2014, 07:50 AM
I did enjoy that.......
Now back to biz, go see what else they managed to FUBAR in 72 hours.
See ya'll a bit later!