PDA

View Full Version : Update on my Geneva Clock



sid pileski
11-30-2014, 05:47 PM
Hey all-
Just a couple of update shots on my version of Wes's Geneva clock. The black pinon gear was ABS in these
shots and has since been made of 302 SS. Just made it from plastic to tweak the design a little.
My version uses off the shelf gears, as opposed to cutting my own.
Just a few more parts to make. Like my version of the magnet clock (of Wes's design), the PC board will go in
the base of wood. I used Babinga (sp?) provided by a generous member here. The aluminum parts will be anodized and I'd like to have the Geneva gear nickel plated. (like to do that myself).
Anyway, please take a look.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/sids32/IMG_1725_zps643fc1d1.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/sids32/media/IMG_1725_zps643fc1d1.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/sids32/IMG_1731_zps92724fac.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/sids32/media/IMG_1731_zps92724fac.jpg.html)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/sids32/IMG_1732_zps5370c79d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/sids32/media/IMG_1732_zps5370c79d.jpg.html)

DFMiller
12-01-2014, 12:59 AM
Sid,
That looks nice.
Great pictures.
Dave

winchman
12-01-2014, 07:52 AM
That's some really nice work. As my wife says, "Always start out like you want to continue."

sid pileski
12-01-2014, 09:49 AM
Thanks guys.
Its sould be an interesting piece to display once done.
I'm trying to decide what typ of wood to make the lower base out of.

Sid

Stepside
12-01-2014, 09:51 AM
Sid

As always your work is first class. Back when I was teaching, I had the students Nickle plating Copper, Steel and Brass. The steel was copper plated first and then Nickle plated, with care it was easy. The copper was very easy but the brass needed a pre-treatment before the plating. Finding the source of the brass pre-treatment chemicals has been a bit of a problem. If you have some suggestions please let me know.

As to the kind of wood to use, Peruvian Walnut is very dark brown, almost black and has very little if any grain pattern.

Pete

sid pileski
12-01-2014, 12:16 PM
Sid

As always your work is first class. Back when I was teaching, I had the students Nickle plating Copper, Steel and Brass. The steel was copper plated first and then Nickle plated, with care it was easy. The copper was very easy but the brass needed a pre-treatment before the plating. Finding the source of the brass pre-treatment chemicals has been a bit of a problem. If you have some suggestions please let me know.

As to the kind of wood to use, Peruvian Walnut is very dark brown, almost black and has very little if any grain pattern.

Pete
Thank you.
As far as plating supplies on a small basis, see here: http://www.caswellplating.com/
I have not personally used them yet, but a friend of mine has and said they were very good to work with. As a bonus for me, they are not too far away from my home.
I was kind of toying with the idea of laminating some light and dark woods together, but that might look too bussy.

Weston Bye
12-01-2014, 05:56 PM
A complete departure, or new interpretation of my original Geneva Hours design, with obvious influence from the Magnetic Gear clock.

Sid, you have made the design your own. I like it.

Consider also, the use of Corian countertop material, if you can find a color you like, for the base. It machines easily.

sid pileski
12-01-2014, 08:15 PM
Wes- Thanks! I will look into the Corian material.
The only issue that I've seen so far is that just before the pin on the small wheel is about to enter the slot on the large wheel, the large wheel starts to turn,making the pin not line up where it should.
I'm not sure I described it that well. I've got this layed out in CAD, and cannot see a good geometric solution
to tighten it up??

Sid

sasquatch
12-01-2014, 08:58 PM
Nice work Sid!!

Weston Bye
12-01-2014, 09:01 PM
The only issue that I've seen so far is that just before the pin on the small wheel is about to enter the slot on the large wheel, the large wheel starts to turn, making the pin not line up where it should.

Yes, I have seen the problem you describe. There may be too much friction between the hour hub and the minutes shaft. The turning shaft tries to rotate the wheel as it turns. the prototype I built must be sloppy enough to turn freely, but I found it particularly troublesome when the hour hand points to the right side of the dial, so the hour hand needs to be counterbalanced. I have suggested a chamfer where the pin enters the engagement slot on the Geneva wheel to reduce the chances of a jam.

<edit> I see you are using shielded bearings that should turn fairly freely. You might have to remove the shields to reduce friction...

sid pileski
12-01-2014, 09:25 PM
Yes, I have seen the problem you describe. There may be too much friction between the hour hub and the minutes shaft. The turning shaft tries to rotate the wheel as it turns. the prototype I built must be sloppy enough to turn freely, but I found it particularly troublesome when the hour hand points to the right side of the dial, so the hour hand needs to be counterbalanced. I have suggested a chamfer where the pin enters the engagement slot on the Geneva wheel to reduce the chances of a jam.

<edit> I see you are using shielded bearings that should turn fairly freely. You might have to remove the shields to reduce friction...
Wes- You get EXACTLY what I'm talking about! My gears and shafts have very little friction. I agree about a possible chamfer in the slot and the need for the hour hand to be balanced. My current design dose not have the hour hand balanced. I have not seen a Geneva wheel with 12 positions in my research as I designed my wheel.

Stepside
12-01-2014, 09:46 PM
Sid, Wes

On the "Street Clocks" we built a Hand Balancer to get the hand and the counterweight close to the same weight. Because the clocks have 2 or 4 faces they tend to balance the opposite face. The hands are thin formed sheet metal so there are recesses in the back side to add weight if needed.

Pete

sid pileski
12-02-2014, 08:58 AM
Sid, Wes

On the "Street Clocks" we built a Hand Balancer to get the hand and the counterweight close to the same weight. Because the clocks have 2 or 4 faces they tend to balance the opposite face. The hands are thin formed sheet metal so there are recesses in the back side to add weight if needed.

Pete

Pete- What is a "street clock"??

Sid

Stepside
12-02-2014, 10:06 AM
Sid

Usually found in front of Jewelry stores. 2 or 4 faces Each dial/face about 36 inches diameter. The clock is about 16 to 20 feet tall. The real nice ones have windows in the base so you can watch the weight driven movements. In fact if you know of any in your local area let me know the location an address would be great.
I am in the midst of restoring a movement from one built in the late 1800's or early 1900's.

Pete

sid pileski
12-02-2014, 10:59 AM
Sid

Usually found in front of Jewelry stores. 2 or 4 faces Each dial/face about 36 inches diameter. The clock is about 16 to 20 feet tall. The real nice ones have windows in the base so you can watch the weight driven movements. In fact if you know of any in your local area let me know the location an address would be great.
I am in the midst of restoring a movement from one built in the late 1800's or early 1900's.

Pete
I don't think I've ever seen one?? Any pictures?

Sid

Guido
12-02-2014, 11:03 AM
One of the more famous four faced clocks, London's Big Ben.

Stepside
12-02-2014, 01:02 PM
Sid

Here are a couple of pictures : The two faced one was cast and built in Seattle around 1904. The Dials are 36 inch in Diameter.

The Small movement on the truck is a small Howard and is out of the two faced clock.
The four faced clock is also a Howard movement. In the photo all 8000 pounds of it are being moved into place by the Foss steam powered floating crane. The crane was built in 1943. I reworked this movement and built the pendulum after the "Brass and Copper" stole the original movement and pendulum..
http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0295_01.jpg

http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0726.jpg

http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0292_01.jpg

sid pileski
12-02-2014, 02:12 PM
Wow! That's cool!
Any more pictures of the steam crane?
Live steam is another interest of mine!
BTW, now I understand what you mean by two,four faced.

Sid

Stepside
12-02-2014, 04:15 PM
Sid

I had a girl friend that was "two faced", Had being the operant word here. I really think her mother was "four faced" or at least twice as bad. But that is history from 50 years ago.
http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0690.jpg

http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0718.jpg

http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0652.jpg

Here are three pictures of the crane. I don't know for a fact that the 300 on the back of the doghouse means 300 tons. No matter it is one big crane. Some of the gear predates the 1943 date of when it was built.

I wish I could put smells and sound with the pictures. Both the sound of the crane and the communication between the members of the onshore and on deck is still with me when I look at the pictures.

TGTool
12-02-2014, 04:24 PM
http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0690.jpg

http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0718.jpg

http://i1148.photobucket.com/albums/o563/72stepside/SHOP/photobucket/DSC_0652.jpg

Here are three pictures of the crane. I don't know for a fact that the 300 on the back of the doghouse means 300 tons. No matter it is one big crane. Some of the gear predates the 1943 date of when it was built.

I wish I could put smells and sound with the pictures. Both the sound of the crane and the communication between the members of the onshore and on deck is still with me when I look at the pictures.

Holy Smokes!! And that's a pair of handrails going up the boom. That would be pucker territory!

sid pileski
12-02-2014, 06:59 PM
So, why it the crane where it is? is it a working (money making) piece or is it a museum?
Is the structure at the front of the crane a steam plant?
Was it refurbished at some point in its life? Brought back from the forgotten or scrapper?

Sid

Stepside
12-02-2014, 08:28 PM
Sid

As far as I know it has been in service since it was built. It is a money making piece of equipment. It has two boilers and burns some form of oil not coal. Rather than refurbished it has been maintained. It is headquartered on the ship canal between Lake Union and the Ballard locks.

Since you are interested in Steam power, about 90 minutes North in the town of Anacortes is the stern wheeler Preston. This you can walk over most of the boat. The Preston is set up on dry land in a park. I have pictures but they are out in the shop.

The clock was being relocated to the new MOHAI museum and it was easier to use the floating crane rather than a truck mounted crane. I guess you need to visit us in Seattle to see the whole layout of the museum, the lake, the park and the ship canal.

Pete

sid pileski
12-02-2014, 09:34 PM
Sounds like it would be a great visit!!

Sid

topct
12-03-2014, 09:46 AM
Stepside, thanks for the picture of the crane. I have passed it a million times as that waterway was what we patrolled from the Coast Guard base that was located just inside the locks. Foss has always taken very good care of their equipment. When it was working it could be heard from a long ways away. It has a unique sound to it.

The clocks with two and four faces are interesting. A desk piece made in a more.............