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View Full Version : Semi-OT -- information about all th elements



SGW
12-07-2014, 07:08 AM
Click on any element:
http://ed.ted.com/periodic-videos

A.K. Boomer
12-07-2014, 08:21 AM
Bookmarked and useful, thanks

Lew Hartswick
12-07-2014, 09:04 AM
The "Handbook of Chemistry and Physics" is the "bible" for that info.
:-) and doesn't require a computer or internet connection. :-)
...lew...

loose nut
12-07-2014, 09:46 AM
But does require a bank loan to buy.

Lew Hartswick
12-07-2014, 10:10 AM
But does require a bank loan to buy.

Admittedly mine is a 62 edition but wasn't that expensive when I got it. :-)
...lew...

Mark Rand
12-07-2014, 10:14 AM
Admittedly mine is a 62 edition but wasn't that expensive when I got it. :-)
...lew...

Does it have all the new elements in it???

alanganes
12-07-2014, 10:48 AM
Does it have all the new elements in it???

Just a guess, but I suspect that it lists nothing discovered after 1962...

:p

boslab
12-07-2014, 11:46 AM
Unobtainium, Adamantium, and the most common element in industry bull****ium are note ably absent, however it's good to hold a desk Down
Mark

Lew Hartswick
12-07-2014, 12:21 PM
Those "elements" that last only in the sub nanoseconds as far as I'm concerned don't have much (any)
use to the machinists, either home or professional. :-)
...lew...

Mike Nash
12-07-2014, 01:32 PM
Those "elements" that last only in the sub nanoseconds as far as I'm concerned don't have much (any)
use to the machinists, either home or professional. :-)
...lew...

I'm pretty sure it's one of those elements that keeps derailing my train of thought. I'm pretty sure it's not Alz.. Als.. All's well that ends well!

38_Cal
12-07-2014, 01:48 PM
I'm pretty sure it's one of those elements that keeps derailing my train of thought. I'm pretty sure it's not Alz.. Als.. All's well that ends well!

I don't have grey hair and oldtimers moments...it's silver blond and I have blond moments! That's my story & I'm sticking to it!

A.K. Boomer
12-07-2014, 02:30 PM
The "Handbook of Chemistry and Physics" is the "bible" for that info.
:-) and doesn't require a computer or internet connection. :-)
...lew...

It's also lacking the guy with the freaky hair-do --- half caught between Albert E. and big bird...

PStechPaul
12-07-2014, 04:48 PM
I found the video about Copernicium (112) rather interesting, being the last of the traditionally named (and synthesized) elements. Places have been reserved for elements up to 118 with three-letter temporary names. Copernicium was to have the abbreviation Cp but that had at some point in time been used for Cassiopium (71) which is now called Lutetium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutetium).

There was a "game" on the dog forum (http://www.dogsnharmony.com/community/) I frequent, asking members to name as many dog breeds as possible in 20 minutes. I came up with about 80, I think, but there are probably hundreds, and I was far from winning. But I proposed that people name as many elements as they could, with extra credit for the abbreviation, and most did not even try. I think I got about 60.

danlb
12-07-2014, 05:08 PM
Does that 1962 issue of "Handbook of Chemistry and Physics" include the newest elements?

My favorite is
WTF:
Common name: The element of surprise
States: Confused
Isotopes: HUH?


Dan

mklotz
12-07-2014, 05:42 PM
But does require a bank loan to buy.

Frequent your local library book sales. I went to ours today and they had the 58th and 59th editions for $2 apiece.

Royldean
12-08-2014, 08:25 AM
Those "elements" that last only in the sub nanoseconds as far as I'm concerned don't have much (any)
use to the machinists, either home or professional. :-)
...lew...

I'm pretty sure machinists don't need ANY information in that book, that can't already be found in the machinery handbook.

Lew Hartswick
12-08-2014, 09:53 AM
Well to begin with the 62nd edition was printed in 1982 . SO! you "all-knowing" folks should learn a bit
about the subject before you jump in with such conclusions. It goes to element 106 so I think it's
adequate for any discussion on "machine-ability". :-)
...lew...

boslab
12-08-2014, 09:55 AM
Our chem master in school made us recite them like the times tables, I have absolutely no need of it but have a periodic table on my shop wall, sometimes it stare at it, thinking "is that all there is" every bit of the universe just about listed almost neatly on the wall, the infinite made of just those building bricks, humbling
Btw it's an Aldrich one designed for a classroom, nice and big!
Mark

Frank Ford
12-08-2014, 11:09 AM
The "Handbook of Chemistry and Physics" is the "bible" for that info.
:-) and doesn't require a computer or internet connection. :-)
...lew...


Well, that's obvious enough, isn't it? And you might just find a copy in your public library.

I'm quite certain that wasn't the point of posting that useful and entertaining link.

SGW - thanks for that one! I have lots of semi-tech pals who will enjoy it as well.

EddyCurr
12-08-2014, 01:28 PM
For my money, no discussion of the elements is complete
without giving some consideration to those that did not
make the cut


The Periodic Table of Rejected Elements (http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1999/08/the-periodic-table-of-rejected-elements/305046/)
Michael Gerber and Jonathan Schwarz
The Atlantic 1999.08

.

fjk
12-08-2014, 01:58 PM
Isn't this all that one needs
http://youtu.be/DYW50F42ss8
?