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deltap
12-10-2014, 04:01 PM
I have been diagnosed with meniscus damage, minimal swelling, moderate pain. I am 68. Orthopedic surgeon says it will not heal on its own and success may be limited because of mild arthritis. Can anyone share their experience with this type of injury? Only way this relates to machining is I am being kept out of the shop.

cuemaker
12-10-2014, 04:21 PM
I have had the exact same, plus tons more at a different time. I had mine fixed cause the flap from the tear would get in the way of the knee working and cause great pain. I couldnt use stairs properly, had swelling etc...So i had it fixed plus a general clean up the knee. I had total recon of the knee in 26yrs earlier.

Meniscus will not heal or repair itself.

If it was me, the questions I would want answered are:
1. Will I do more damage if left un repaired.
2. Will it always be an issue, or will I get back to "normal" use with some therapy and drugs?

If the answer that it will always be an issue if you dont fix it.. I wouldnt settle for that.

Also, go to the biggest town you possibly can, and pick a group that specializes in athletes.. Your recovery and success are DIRECTLY related to the surgeon you pick..and the one that is working on college/pro athletes will have the most experience.

I have a coworker who had to have knee replacement. He was going to have it done in Dayton, but was a bit unsure. As his boss, I made him drive to Columbus to visit the facility and Drs that handle Ohio State University athletes. After his appointment, he felt totally comfortable with having the surgery and was back to work with minor issues (theres always issues) in the expected time frame.

If anything... Find the right Dr.'s.. even it means travelling.

hitnmiss
12-10-2014, 04:25 PM
I had the surgery (Meniscus tear removal) on my right knee. Recovery was very quick, I was walking on it the next day (gingerly!) Fee's great know (about 2 years later)

They usually don't know if they will remove or repair the meniscus until they get in there. Removing the damage is quicker recovery but repair is better long term outlook. I believe the older you are the less likely a repair will be.

Black Forest
12-10-2014, 04:35 PM
I have had the minicus removed in my left knee. And he did some scraping because of the arthritis. Good advice on going to a athletes Dr. I went to one here in Germany that only works on knees of professional foot ball players(Soccer). I will have to have both my knees replaced at some point but I am waiting until I have to have it done. My recovery took quite a while.

Bob Fisher
12-10-2014, 04:54 PM
Had both knees replaced about 12 yrs ago, about your present age. Haven't looked back, no pain whatsoever, recovery was very fast. Physical therapy is the key to a rapid recovery. Look for a facility that has an advanced recovery program. There's more machining involved than you might think. The prosthesis has to be carefully fitted to the bones. Good luck , Bob.

mooney1el
12-10-2014, 06:01 PM
I have had three knee surgeries and my experience says that having the right physical therapist is just as important as having the right doctor. All mine were done by doctors and therapy clinics who specialized in "sports medicine". After my last one, done by Dr Mayo, my co-worker asked; "So, do you now have Mayo-Knees" :)


Richard

KIMFAB
12-10-2014, 06:01 PM
We'll see how this goes. I'm getting my right knee replaced Jan 19. It's been bone on bone for ten years and the time has come.

They tell me that I'll have 3 days of outage then about 6 weeks till good again.

Joe Rogers
12-10-2014, 06:50 PM
Guys, anyone thinking of knee surgery please follow the rehab and wound care instructions. A good friend had a knee replacement and a staph infection set in. The joint had to be removed and a spacer installed ( with no hinge ) with a pic line and daily infusions to keep the infection from killing him. Nearly a year later the knee was rebuilt a second time. His primary health issue is now infection control as his bloodstream has chronic septicemia. Just sayin'...
Joe

brian Rupnow
12-10-2014, 06:57 PM
My mother had both knees done when she was 69--she had a lot of severe arthritis damage. She had a quick recovery and now at 94 she says it was one of the best things she has ever had done. No regrets whatsoever.

A.K. Boomer
12-10-2014, 07:56 PM
Only way this relates to machining is I am being kept out of the shop.



Not really --- actually just about everything relates to machining,,, and this link kinda drives it home https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1psAJc3rCzs


so now you can tell any whimpering whiners complaining about your OT post to shut the _ _ _ _ up and watch the video,,, any questions? lol hope it all works out dude - there are some amazing supplements and natural anti-inflammation things that can drastically help you out..

JRouche
12-10-2014, 08:26 PM
Solly to hear deltap I shattered my upper tibia this june and my surgeon said I will have knee replacement some day.

I really like my surgeon. He retired from the military as a Colonel. Right up till the day he retired he was in the field working on legs. Broken bones, amputations, the whole nine yards. Then went right to work in the civilian world.

He has operated on legs since the 70's and knows what he is doing. He is older but but I sure wouldn't want some 30 year old "Practicing" on my leg. Just a thought.

Good luck with the cartilage repair.... JR

http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x461/_GLE_/HSM/pinsandsticks_zpsf006b231.jpg (http://s1183.photobucket.com/user/_GLE_/media/HSM/pinsandsticks_zpsf006b231.jpg.html)

Bob Fisher
12-10-2014, 08:54 PM
KIMFAB,if you have your surgery early in the day, you will almost surely walk on it the same day. If you are in reasonably good health, shouldn't take anything near 6 was to resume a regular schedule. Good Luck, Bob.

chucketn
12-10-2014, 08:59 PM
My wife has had both knees replaced about 5 years apart. It took her less time to recover from the second replacement because she had a better PT. This time they did pt at home for 2 weeks and then a month of PT at a clinic. It was painful, yes, but the second op rehab kept her working with lots of encouragement. Plus, any kind of narcotic pain meds make her terrably sick to the stomach, so she has done it this time with Aleve. 1 month after the second knee was replaced(Nov 20, this year), she had back surgery to repair degenerative arthritis. That also is now giving her a hard time. But she sees some improvement every day and will tell you now it was worth it.
The thing is, as the others have said, do the PT!
I tell her she has more stainless steel and titanium in her than is in my car!
Chuck

ironmonger
12-10-2014, 10:57 PM
Guys, anyone thinking of knee surgery please follow the rehab and wound care instructions. A good friend had a knee replacement and a staph infection set in. The joint had to be removed and a spacer installed ( with no hinge ) with a pic line and daily infusions to keep the infection from killing him. Nearly a year later the knee was rebuilt a second time. His primary health issue is now infection control as his bloodstream has chronic septicemia. Just sayin'...
Joe

+1 Joe

I'm 66 and I had a meniscus tear repair this spring. I was on the leg the same day, Takes a little time for the swelling to go down, but I was pain free as regards the surgery. The end result was a definite improvement, but still some mild pain during exercise near the limits of deflection.

The rehab for this was my normal gym routine, modified as required. I talked to my doctor and he felt that my normal workout routine exceeded what he would require, and as long as it was comfortable he was OK with it. I work out on a elliptical and then attend a class with tai chi, yoga and pilates 5 days a week. Probably took 4-6 weeks before the knee was comfortable to kneel on. Piece of cake compared to rotator cuff repair (shudder..) I donít want to do that on the other side if I can help it.

paul

BigBoy1
12-11-2014, 07:33 AM
Had the same problem with the left knee which was replaced 5 years ago. I tell everyone that I'm doing everything I did before, just a bit slower and more carefully but totally without the pain. My right knee is now giving me problems and after all of the "bandaids" tried, I'm scheduled to have it replace in Feb. Went to the same doctor, which meant traveling 100 miles each way but it was sure worth it with the first knee. My doc was in the Army and had lots of experience working with the wounded soldiers.

DR
12-11-2014, 09:42 AM
Several have mentioned using surgeons specializing in sports medicine. My experience may not have been so good.

My knee has given me pain in exercise since I damaged it in a car accident as a nineteen year old. Until I got into my sixties the pain was more of a minor annoyance. But, jogging now has become almost impossible, I'm limited to walking and non impact type activities.

I consulted with a sports medicine doc associated with the clinics connected with the local university medical school. He x-rayed and noted the almost total lack of cartilage. He said I was a prime candidate for knee replacement and was amazed I wasn't in constant pain. I'm not in pain except when running. So he advised if I wanted to postpone the surgery but still run I should dope up on pain killers and go for it.

That has to be about the dumbest advice ever. If I was the star quarterback maybe okay to do it for the team, but that's far from my situation.

Anyway, I'm holding off from knee replacement and have been getting amazing relief with knee strengthening exercises advised by a chiropractor.

Old Hat
12-11-2014, 09:52 AM
If I had $5 for every happy soul who told me ya gotta have the best Doctor,
and you MUST follow thru with the therapy dilligently..........

I'd be ordering that double size Noga right now in stead of posting.

deltap
12-11-2014, 08:24 PM
Thanks all for your help and kind words.

garyhlucas
12-11-2014, 10:06 PM
Back to the machining thing, I'd read that electron beam sintered 3d printed parts have taken some 60% market share in hip replacements worldwide. They make the part exactly for you, its done in a vacuum with no coolant contamination, and the titanium is spongy and porous so the bone attaches better. I wonder if we will reach the point where we can do that stuff in the home shop?

Black Forest
12-12-2014, 03:13 AM
Back to the machining thing, I'd read that electron beam sintered 3d printed parts have taken some 60% market share in hip replacements worldwide. They make the part exactly for you, its done in a vacuum with no coolant contamination, and the titanium is spongy and porous so the bone attaches better. I wonder if we will reach the point where we can do that stuff in the home shop?

Not me. I don't like the sight of my own blood!

sawlog
12-20-2014, 10:15 PM
The meniscus repair I had this spring went well. My rotator cup deal was and is a hole lot worse

kendall
12-21-2014, 01:18 AM
Several have mentioned using surgeons specializing in sports medicine. My experience may not have been so good.

My knee has given me pain in exercise since I damaged it in a car accident as a nineteen year old. Until I got into my sixties the pain was more of a minor annoyance. But, jogging now has become almost impossible, I'm limited to walking and non impact type activities.

I consulted with a sports medicine doc associated with the clinics connected with the local university medical school. He x-rayed and noted the almost total lack of cartilage. He said I was a prime candidate for knee replacement and was amazed I wasn't in constant pain. I'm not in pain except when running. So he advised if I wanted to postpone the surgery but still run I should dope up on pain killers and go for it.

That has to be about the dumbest advice ever. If I was the star quarterback maybe okay to do it for the team, but that's far from my situation.

Anyway, I'm holding off from knee replacement and have been getting amazing relief with knee strengthening exercises advised by a chiropractor.

That's one reason I completely avoid pain killers. They hide the damage you're doing to yourself.
Second reason is that if you have chronic pain (knee and shoulder for me), they make it hurt a hundred times worse when they wear off.

I'm scheduled for knee surgery soon, and frankly it scares the crap out of me because I am a very 'mobile' person, long walks and bike rides are a very important part of my life.

elf
12-21-2014, 03:12 AM
That's one reason I completely avoid pain killers. They hide the damage you're doing to yourself.
Second reason is that if you have chronic pain (knee and shoulder for me), they make it hurt a hundred times worse when they wear off.

I'm scheduled for knee surgery soon, and frankly it scares the crap out of me because I am a very 'mobile' person, long walks and bike rides are a very important part of my life.

You should be looking forward to it instead of fearing it. You'll be much more mobile and pain free after the operation, assuming you do the PT.

kendall
12-21-2014, 10:38 AM
Maybe scared is not the best word, never had any kind of surgery so nervous about it.

Alistair Hosie
12-21-2014, 11:36 AM
B Forest your doc sounds like the Knockenbreaker I went to when I pulled the discs on my neck he did all the footballers and did ok by me.Alistair

krutch
12-23-2014, 12:50 PM
Having just found this thread late, didn't read all the posts and so I don't know if this has been suggested. I have a torn meniscus and was scheduled for an aftermarket knee. VA canceled that and instead got a wedge for the inside of my footwear. The wedge helps by putting my knee in another attitude while walking or standing. It works! I still have some pain at times, but don't need the steroid shots and can walk, stand at my machines, etc. I used to need my left boot built up as that leg is about 1 1/2" short. The shoe repair shop retired and so I eventually quit using a Frankenstein boot on the left leg.
Eventually I will need that knee replaced but the wedge has put that time off until later. By then there might be a better knee or corrective device.

Evan
12-23-2014, 04:32 PM
Definitely avoid drugs as much as possible. There are so many drugs that you can easily be prescribed but every last one of them has side effects that can be very nasty. Not all of those side effects are obvious such as the very many drugs that reduce platelet counts and the very many that alter brain operation in generally bad ways. I quit all but one of the drugs I was taking (well, 1.1) and it made a big positive difference. I no longer take an anti depressant because it is a platelet killer (all of them and all types are) and it turns out that by just changing my diet I am feeling even better than when I was taking the anti depressant. I still take codeine (and a tiny amount of modafinil) but that is for a reason that very few people experience, my severe idiopathic dysautonomia.

I have problems in all of my joints and tested positive for autoimmune arthritis back in the 90s but there is nothing for that I am willing to take and surgery is out of the question. Live and die with it is the only option.