PDA

View Full Version : Need a carbon, gun propellant solvent for the untrasonic tank.



michigan doug
12-15-2014, 10:51 AM
I built a suppressor some time ago. What a hoot!

That one is for my .22, which is a pretty dirty cartridge. I have tried various things to clean it without damaging it.

It disassembles, so that's a big plus. Many of the commercial "cans" don't. ???

I am hoping to use a 60-70 watt ultrasound and some warm solvent to do 90% of the work.

Because it's aluminum, it can't be a strong alkali like purple power and simple green.

Dish soap and warm water in a 30 watt ultrasound does something, slowly, but there is still some heavy caked on stuff.


It would be nice if it wasn't a fire hazard, or overly expensive.





Thanks in advance!

MetalMunger
12-15-2014, 10:58 AM
This stuff cuts carbon fast but may affect some aluminum alloys check it out on a piece of scrap.
http://www.sharpshootr.com/tactical-advantage/

Doozer
12-15-2014, 11:47 AM
Cresotic acid maybe? Should be safe on aluminum and zinc, and it dissolves (or at least it releases the bond of) carbon.

-Doozer

CarlByrns
12-15-2014, 12:04 PM
Liquid Tide works a treat on just about everything.

Toolguy
12-15-2014, 12:43 PM
Use Carbon Cutter from www.slip2000.com. It is made specifically for this purpose. It is water based, non hazardous, non flammable, biodegradeable and safe.

Yondering
12-15-2014, 01:06 PM
I use PineSol, mixed 50/50 with warm water. I'm sure something like Carbon Cutter might work better though.

ironmonger
12-15-2014, 02:27 PM
The only solvent I know of for carbon is molten iron...

On a different subject, what do you think the odds are you will get a visit?
You won't have to worry about solvents...

paul

michigan doug
12-15-2014, 03:18 PM
A visit from Santa Clause?

A visit from the BATFE?


Chance of Santa visit = 0

Chance of visit from BATFE = 0


I got my tax stamp on a form 1 build, and everything is registered and above board.

Both the feds and my state and local laws allow for suppressors, IF you get the tax stamp.

doug

Rosco-P
12-15-2014, 04:33 PM
The only solvent I know of for carbon is molten iron...

On a different subject, what do you think the odds are you will get a visit?
You won't have to worry about solvents...

paul

Too funny! I can remember my Chem. professors being asking what could be used to clean carbon from the inside of a glass vessel (flask, beaker, test tube, etc.). His reply, "Use anything in the stock room marked: Carbon solvent." The stockroom assistant got a good laugh from the student request.

boslab
12-15-2014, 04:59 PM
Coleman lamp oil works with carbon encrusted injectors, it's the naphthalene that helps, carbon will come off nicely, carbon is sparingly soluble in lots of solvents, if you wash off in toluene and get a nice purple mauve colour you may have some buckmeisterfullerine aka C60 buckyballs or some other allotrope, sure there a bit of toluene in colemans too!
Mark

ironmonger
12-15-2014, 06:34 PM
A visit from Santa Clause?

A visit from the BATFE?


Chance of Santa visit = 0

Chance of visit from BATFE = 0


I got my tax stamp on a form 1 build, and everything is registered and above board.

Both the feds and my state and local laws allow for suppressors, IF you get the tax stamp.

doug

Serious about the solvent, and relieved about the registration and sorry you're on Santa's 'B' list.

I have used washing soda (Calcium Carbonate) to clean brass in my DIY ultrasonic tank. Works pretty good and it's cheap to try. As with any process, try it on scrap material before you put the money parts in.

Did you file a trust or personal application?
Do they require submittal of plans or did you use a kit.?

paul

gzig5
12-15-2014, 08:11 PM
I don't know if it is still available but I always heard rave reviews from highpower competitors on how well GM Top Engine cleaner worked on carbon build up in the throat. There are other automotive cleaners aimed at eliminating carbon buildup too.

oxford
12-15-2014, 08:36 PM
I don't know if it is still available but I always heard rave reviews from highpower competitors on how well GM Top Engine cleaner worked on carbon build up in the throat. There are other automotive cleaners aimed at eliminating carbon buildup too.

When I worked for Saturn they had a top engine cleaner, probably the same as GM in a different container. It worked well for cleaning the carbon off of pistons on rebuilds, didn't hurt the aluminum either. We would just let them soak in a container of it. A quick google search appears it may be GM part number 1050002

lost_cause
12-15-2014, 08:39 PM
i've never used that stuff, or this either, but if what's in this thread is accurate, they look pretty impressive. look at the difference in the pistons between the beginning and end of the page. also, since it's being used on pistons, i guess it's safe for aluminum.

http://revlimiter.net/blog/2011/04/clean-your-pistons-like-a-boss/

Glug
12-15-2014, 08:41 PM
Several years back I read about a guy who shot skeet nearly every day. He wanted to be able to clean his shotgun parts without any scrubbing and without any nasty chemicals. He was a retired dentist and used a small commercial quality ultrasonic cleaner. I searched but was unable to find his original write-up. A baking soda solution comes to mind but that may have just been one of the solutions he tested.

michigan doug
12-16-2014, 08:58 AM
OK, we got some good leads here.

I got/made a legal trust first.

No, you don't have to submit any plans. You do have to tell them the length (why? who knows?) and the caliber.

I built it from scratch, using my own (not so original) k-baffle plans.

Sadly, it appears that the "good" gm product has been discontinued and is rare/expensive/hard to get. The new stuff is said to be inferior.


doug

CarlByrns
12-16-2014, 12:03 PM
Sadly, it appears that the "good" gm product has been discontinued and is rare/expensive/hard to get. The new stuff is said to be inferior.


doug

That is correct. The old stuff worked great in high-mileage engines, but would lay down an impressive smoke screen for miles. We used it at night :D

gstprecision
12-16-2014, 08:43 PM
I use a simple solution of warm water, dish soap, lemon juice and vinegar to clean brass. Works awesome without having to rub anything.

Not sure if that would work.

A bunch of black powder shooter I know clean their rifle with dish soap and warm water, they swear nothing works better

GST

Willy
12-16-2014, 10:12 PM
The Carbon Killer (http://www.slip2000.com/slip2000_carbon_killer.php) (not carbon cutter) that Toolguy referenced to has according to it's msds a citrus based component as it's main cleaning ingredient.
Having had good results cleaning carbon off of diesel truck exhaust stacks with Citrus Clean (http://www.citruscleanit.com/uses.php) I thought it might warrant a mention.

From their many cleaning suggestions on the above page.



Carbon
Used at a 20:1 solution, Citrus Clean can solve these problems:

For stacks, spray directly on and rinse off surface when carbon appears to run.
When using for dripping (in extreme cases), mix a 7:1 solution, soak for one hour, then rinse. For example; carbon on piston heads, epoxy glues, silicone, seals and gaskets.



I'm sure one of the many other citrus based cleaners are probably in the same ballpark as far as effectiveness goes. It might be worth a shot (pun intended) as you may have some at home already.

michigan doug
12-17-2014, 08:20 AM
Will post results of experiments once I have my 70 watt untrasonic tank. Probably couple months.


Thanks for the help!

doug

Yondering
12-17-2014, 12:55 PM
This wasn't what you asked for, but on my aluminum .22 suppressor, I've found the best way to clean the baffles is a bead blaster. Glass beads with low air pressure take the carbon and lead off quickly, but don't do much more than frost the surface of the aluminum. I guess it's technically "damaging" the aluminum, but if you don't overdo it, there's no problem. I've been cleaning mine that way for 8-10 years now; the baffles fit as tightly as ever, and it's still just as quiet. Just don't use it on the outer anodized surfaces.

Speaking of anodizing, some solutions in ultrasonic cleaners do a good job of removing that. I wouldn't put my whole suppressor in there.

quasi
12-18-2014, 12:18 AM
Google "Ed's Red"

michigan doug
12-18-2014, 11:09 AM
I have made and used Ed's Red for years, but haven't tried it in an ultrasonic tank.

Work doesn't want any oil based stuff in their water based tank.


When I get my own...



Yes, bead blasting and/or soda blasting are on my someday list.


Finest regards,

doug

quasi
12-18-2014, 03:36 PM
do not use Ed's Red or any solvent based cleaner in an ultrasonic cleaner, a fire can result.