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Kiwi
12-21-2014, 09:48 PM
<iframe width="480" height="360" src="http://s355.photobucket.com/user/Thorcalmac/embed/slideshow/"></iframe>http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_0872.jpghttp://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_0878.jpg (http://s355.photobucket.com/user/Thorcalmac/media/IMG_0878.jpg.html)
The next image should be of a sore back after skating it across the yard to the workshop but i'm smiling.For those who haven't been introduced to British lathes it's a Colchester 6 1/2 Master I believe that Causing had a partner ship deal with them. we transported it home in a good old northeasterly storm as we had to clear it out of the auction house and boy did it get wet the purists would be screaming, being that wet I just water blasted the crude off the out side ragged it down and emptied a couple of cans of WD40 on it between showers the next day and covered it over until it reached the shop, emptied out the sludge tank (coolant) no wonder the it had a new coolant pump fitted. As I can,t run it up due to the plug our rules and regulations required us to change our 3 phase plugs and sockets from the ray-role to the new plastic ones and I haven't done mine yet so i can see a wiring job coming one question to those with this machine the metric/imperial lever does not engage the lead screw on the metric side it comes up solid which says to me some one has had the gear box cover off and resembled it wrong rotating the chuck does not help but will have to wait
One stoked Kiwi

Old Hat
12-21-2014, 09:59 PM
Very Sweet!:cool:

Wonder what the archiologists will come up with, to explain lathes
found in garages all over the planet, in a couple thousand years?

flylo
12-22-2014, 08:17 AM
They will know that's where the smartest people lived!:p

EddyCurr
12-22-2014, 12:21 PM
While I do not have anything to contribute regarding
the lever engagement question, I am pleased to
compliment you on the acquisition of a nice-looking
lathe and a moving job well done.

The following manual, courtesy of the Igor Chudov
site, may be helpful if you've not got docs yet for
the machine:


Clausing Colchester 6500 Manual (http://igor.chudov.com/manuals/Clausing/Clausing-Colchester-6500-13-06-manual.pdf)

.

fjk
12-22-2014, 12:38 PM
Very Sweet!:cool:

Wonder what the archiologists will come up with, to explain lathes
found in garages all over the planet, in a couple thousand years?


A small oppressed cult which worshiped large chunks of iron/carbon mix.
The cult seemed to start in places like Birmingham and Cincinnati
but eventually passed out of favor with the Masters of The Universe
(who occupied London's City, Tokyo, Wall Street, and Frankfurt)
hunting them down. Rather than die off completely, the cult broke up
and spread around the globe, much like the Jewish Diaspora ~2000
years earlier. Slowly they were reduced to worshiping in private; usually
in dimly lit, poorly ventilated, vastly overcrowded places like "basements"
and "garages" (editor's note it is still not clear to scholars and historians
what these "basements" and "garages" were; some believe them to
be small hidden spaces in dwellings where people "made things", others
believe them to be glorified storage areas, and the rest think them fictitious).
While the cult had been reduced to a mere shadow of its former self by about
the year 2000ad, there were still some places where it still was practiced
in public, such as outside of Milwaukee...

(or so says the Encyclopedia Terra, 11,532ad edition, printed in New Pyongyang)

Frank
(sorry to the OP, I just had to take the ball and run with it ... :-)

IanParkin
12-22-2014, 01:09 PM
Congrats on your new lathe
I have the same lathe so any questions ask away
The reassembly is difficult to get wrong if the lead shaft has been out
It may just be tight if its not been used much
The gear in question is part number 6697 in the parts book linked to above by Eddycurr
Mine has a matrix clutch fitted and I have fitted a spindle brake and variable speed drive and 2 axis DRO's
I had to strip mine completely to get it into a basement workshop down 13 steps

Ian

flylo
12-22-2014, 01:37 PM
I don't think I could find the pics but one guy put an entire shop in the basement by cutting a hole in the kitchen floor & wall right in front of the fridge & sink. Brave guy or great wife.

Alistair Hosie
12-22-2014, 04:04 PM
I do believe this is a prudent time to say.HAVE FUN.LOL and avery merry Christmas to you and yours too bonnie laddie.Your old Uncle Alistair,Who just happens to be well known in Scotland as the best friend the taxman ever had.LOL Why I am sure I have more or less single handedly contributed all that has been spent on both Illegal imigrants and trident nuclear programme.

Kiwi
12-22-2014, 05:49 PM
Hey thanks guys for all the positive feed back And a special thank you to EddyCurr for the much wanted Manual THANKS perhaps the archaeologists will find my bones still at the controls. I no doubt will have questions so may well prevail upon you thank goodness I didn't have to take it down stairs My son Tom did suggest tying a rope around it and the garage post and rip the trailer out from underneath yeah right or lower it down through a hole in the kitchen floor bringing it into the kitchen would have had my flesh flayed from my bones no archaeologists need then just a crime investigator

Merry Christmas to one and all
Kiwi

Paul Alciatore
12-22-2014, 08:02 PM
Neat! Santa even had it tied up with a ribbon in the first picture. I assume you already took the bow off.

Happy Chips!

Kiwi
01-22-2015, 06:52 PM
Well the wiring job is finally done and it runs very nicely on the clean up I found a corrections label on it and my office managers ex works for corrections so found out that it came from the woman's prison near by so managed to get hold of the head teacher who had the unfortunate job of closing up the prison workshops he found the 4 jaw chuck that should have been with it :) all my Christmases are coming at once but I do have a question for those that know them it has a two speed motor fitted to it http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_0916-1.jpg
yet it is a single speed machinehttp://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_0912-1.jpg
Was this common or have I read the motor label wrong I read it as 1400 & 1680 RPM the speed label just shows one set of speeds if the two speeds are used on the motor how is it changed I don't have manual rev counter and by looking at it I can't detect a difference but it is only 280 rpm so unlikely I would. Or is it just a single phase option ? The other thing is adjustable mounts does any one have a drawing of the original ones there are plenty after market ones around but seam quite pricey and light in construction so probably makes it a realistic option to make some up
Cheers Andy

JSR
01-22-2015, 07:28 PM
I think it's 1400 rpm at 50 cycles, and 1680 at 60 cycles.

John

Kiwi
01-22-2015, 10:23 PM
Thanks so not two speed motor

Kiwi
02-20-2015, 05:01 AM
Duno if I should resurrect this old thread or start a new one makes no odds I guess any way, well the beast is now sitting in position on some adjustable feet and leveled will do it again in six months, the wiring is done a new light above so time to make some chips

http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_1045.jpg

Well that was the plan the headstock and gears ran very well and not as noisey as expected for its age the longitudinal feed and the cross feed is all good but the half nut does not engage the lead screw so it looks like a little repair job coming up any sugestions as to where I might find one

http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_1044.jpg

Now I got sent a parts manual Cheers EddyCurr which is not an instructional manual so maybe some one can advise/confirm the use of the apron controls for EG when screw cutting the big lever is engaged the middle knob (cross slide or saddle selector) is disengaged by putting it in in the half way position and is the feed engagement latch by putting it in down position this is locked out from engaging when the screw cutting lever is down engaging the lead screw but it has two types of thread depicted on it for a large thread wind the knob anti clock wise and clock wise for fine I assume it is for fast and slow saddle & cross slide feeds
Cheers Kiwi

Euph0ny
02-20-2015, 06:17 AM
Duno if I should resurrect this old thread...

the half nut does not engage the lead screw so it looks like a little repair job coming up any sugestions as to where I might find one

This thread's not so old! For the half-nut, maybe an acetal Evanut (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/43645-Making-Acetal-leadscrew-nuts-the-easy-way) would do the trick, at least temporarily?

Davidhcnc
02-20-2015, 06:22 AM
No. the circular plate (with 2 rivets) shows a spring, not a thread, Screw the knob in to make it a heavy spring and out to make it a light spring.

This sets the auto feed dis connect pressure against a bed stop.



FYI when you want to screwcut use the lefthand lever (for the halfnuts) You dont need to touch the push pull or the autofeed. Just dont engage both at the same time.

In your first post you mentioned a metric/imperial lever. It does not have a metric/imperial lever. You choose metric/imperial by swapping the gears.

Davidhcnc
02-20-2015, 06:30 AM
'half nut does not engage the lead screw '

I just checked, they are mechanically interlocked, you cannot engage halfnuts(left lever pointing up) and autofeed (lever with 2 rivets) at the same time. It is one or the other.

That is a very capable machine you have there. Any questions ask:)

hermetic
02-20-2015, 08:20 AM
Hi Kiwi, have you got an instruction manual yet? If not I can send you a pdf for the colchester student lathe which is the same, but has a shorter bed. That is a Mk 1 1/2 master (I have a Mk1 student) in that it has the earlier round head, but with the later controls on the apron. As someone has said the control with the round plate with the two rivets on the apron switches the sliding and surfacing feeds on and off and twists to adjust the slip safety clutch, and the round knob with one rivet switches between sliding feed and surfacing feed. these controls are interlocked so that the leadscrew cannot be engaged if the sliding/surfacing feeds are in the on position. If you email me phil dot hermetic at langtoft dot net I will send you the manual. Also have a look at www.lathes.co.uk/colchester as there is loads of info there, and I think he will have a reprint of a manual specific to your machine, good luck with it, they are superb workhorses.
Phil
UK

hermetic
02-20-2015, 08:25 AM
Hi Kiwi, just checked the manual, and it covers the Mk1 1/2 apron as fitted to yours, so to all intents and purposes it is the same machine as in the manual.
Phil

Kiwi
02-22-2015, 04:20 AM
The Eva nut looks like an easy fix and may come to that that kind of repair goes against the grain with me so at this stage I'll continue to try and find a replacement

Kiwi
02-22-2015, 04:22 AM
This thread's not so old! For the half-nut, maybe an acetal Evanut (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/43645-Making-Acetal-leadscrew-nuts-the-easy-way) would do the trick, at least temporarily?

Yes it may well do to get the machine up and running looks easy enough

Kiwi
02-22-2015, 06:11 AM
Hi davidhcnc Thanks! not a thread but a spring that makes sense, there is a lever with metric and English threads on the lead screw gearbox ? I tried to post a photo to no avail

hermetic
02-22-2015, 09:14 AM
Hi Kiwi, have you got an instruction manual yet? If not I can send you a pdf for the colchester student lathe which is the same, but has a shorter bed. That is a Mk 1 1/2 master (I have a Mk1 student) in that it has the earlier round head, but with the later controls on the apron. As someone has said the control with the round plate with the two rivets on the apron switches the sliding and surfacing feeds on and off and twists to adjust the slip safety clutch, and the round knob with one rivet switches between sliding feed and surfacing feed. these controls are interlocked so that the leadscrew cannot be engaged if the sliding/surfacing feeds are in the on position. If you email me phil dot hermetic at langtoft dot net I will send you the manual via email. Also have a look at www.lathes.co.uk/colchester as there is loads of info there, and I think he will have a reprint of a manual specific to your machine, good luck with it, they are superb workhorses. I have just checked the manual and it shows the Mk 1 1/2 apron exactly like yours so to all intents and purposes it is the same machine. I have bumped this reply from page 2 just in case you havent read it!
Phil
UK

hermetic
02-22-2015, 09:19 AM
Hi Kiwi, does the halfnut lever move to the closed position, or will it not move? if it wont move you need to put the feed lever into the off position, and the sliding/ surfacing control into the neutral position.
Phil

Kiwi
02-22-2015, 02:30 PM
Hi hermetic no I don't have a the instruction manual as yet not so sure that I need one with all the help I've got from here thanks allot guys it's been awesome most of it I already knew but when I went to thread some rod for the mounting feet and not have it the machine respond as I thought it should I by nature blamed myself for doing it wrong. The only bit I got totally wrong is is the tension spring for releasing the feed engagement lever. Yes the halfnut lever does move once I removed the thread dial I can see the halfnut move but does not engage the lead screw by watching the halfnut and moving the lever the relationship seams normal but their is only one half nut which is normal on these machines I think. I've looked at the lathes UK site thanks I'll send you an email

Cheers Kiwi

Black_Moons
02-22-2015, 02:59 PM
That WD40 better only be there for CLEANING!

It has no place as a lubricant. Cutting fluid for aluminum sure, cleaner for grease on paint you don't want to dissolve sure, but NEVER a lubricant!

PS: Nobody has reported stripping an Evanut yet. Don't consider it a 'hack' repair, Consider it an upgrade to a perfectly formed 'new fangled polymer style' half nut.

They use brass because it wears faster then the hardened steel acme shaft and protects it. Plastic will protect (, self lube and wipe some debris) the leadscrew even better. In some applications plastic gears can last longer then metal due to impact loading. In this application the plastic just might last longer due to its wiping of debris outta the way. Plus you can make it much wider then your existing stock brass half nut and replace it more often for less $$$.

Kiwi
02-22-2015, 05:31 PM
Hi black_Moons The WD 40 was mostly used for cleaning the lathe was transported home in the rain as had to cleared out of the auction rooms in spite of the covers it got drenched and since it was so wet I water blasted the crud off it and rust was forming before I put the water blaster away so I dried it off the best I could and then drowned it in WD 40 The Halfnut appears to be cast iron ( have not removed it as yet ) My problem is I like originality and that is a me problem no way did I intend or to imply Evanut as a hack repair it is a bit of modern technology in plastics that I sadly lack and tend to shy away from I just don't have much to do with plastics in my pumps etc we don't repair the plastics just replace. With all the information out there on old colchester parts and lack of replies to emails as to the availability of halfnuts it is the best solution so far

Cheers Kiwi

Juiceclone
02-22-2015, 07:19 PM
Santa must have one XXXX of a sleigh and REALLY BIG reindeer.

Kiwi
02-22-2015, 07:52 PM
Yep we breed-um big down this neck of the woods ha ha
well just bit the bullet and dropped off the apron

Steve Steven
02-22-2015, 10:57 PM
Kiwi,
I think I can explain the "English - Metric" lever for you. Just a few days ago, I was curious about that on my buddys MK2 Master lathe, and I removed the cover above that lever. Cover held on with two socket head screws, it removed easily. The cover had a gasket, in bad shape so we didn't reuse it.

Looking at the English-Metric lever, under the cover, was a dog clutch that engaged the gearing when moved to the metric position. The English engaged by gear teeth in one direction, the dog clutch the other, only when in the right position. We found that by freewheeling the spindle, SLOWLY revolving the chuck by hand, the Metric would engage when pressure was held on the lever and the dog clutch aligned.

However, to do metric threads, you have to have a 127 tooth gear, and other gears as explained in the manual (which we got from Clausing for $50). So only engaging the lever won't get you to cutting metric threads. We did not get any extra gears with our lathe. I can scan the pages of the manual if you need them. Check and see if the 127 tooth gear is there.

Steve

Kiwi
02-22-2015, 11:54 PM
Yes just have taken the Lead screw out to drop the apron off I'll look at that in due course but first I have to solve the problem of the halfnut not engaging the lead screw
And I think I found the problem there are two bushes that the leadscrew runs through on the apron that are worn the lead screw is 1.024" and at it's worst 1.021 the bush's is at 1.133 at its best at it's worst 1.148 and a halfnut thread depth of 065" so first off replace the bushes

Kiwi
02-23-2015, 03:54 AM
The imperial/metric

http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_1061.jpg
Halfnut

http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_1082.jpg
Leadscrew bush

http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_1085.jpg
halfnut cam

http://i355.photobucket.com/albums/r457/Thorcalmac/IMG_1089.jpg

Kiwi
03-05-2015, 03:55 PM
Ok the end result of stripping down the apron and replacing the bushes fail again it wasn't the bushes but at least nice new bushes in the apron and what I'm thinking is that the last owner has replaced either the halfnut or the halfnut cam that are not for this model master. reasoning the halfnut sits a long way above the leadscrew and the cross slide lever will engage, when you put the half nut engagement lever down it does not engage the leadscrew. So I slid the halfnut off the splines engaged the halfnut and slide the lever back on against the stop as to where it should be. on moving the halfnut lever back up it disengages the leadscrew but the cross slide is still locked out to get it all to work I have set it up in the upper position so the lock out arm will let the cross slide engage the lead screw and remove the lower lever stop so the halfnut will engage the lead screw whilst this will do for now it's cutting across my grain With the cost and availability of getting the original parts the plan at this stage is to strip the lead screw out and see if I can remove the halfnut and cam without removing the apron and then to replace the pin on the halfnut shaft that locates in the cam