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View Full Version : old machinist tips/tricks - please chime in :)



tc429
12-22-2014, 11:54 PM
1) 20+ yrs ago, I had a big lathe spindle with messed up threads... took it back to our old machinist to see if he could swing it in his lathe and chase it- he chuckled, 'give me the nut and 2 minutes'... he started the nut on, smacked it radially with a lead hammer, turned it some more, tapping the whole time... was about 30 seconds till that 4" threaded nut would spin like a top, no damage... the idea is to use the form of the nut to forge the shaft threads back to original shape

the little hammer trick has saved me countless hours over the years. last year a guy was rebuilding a wrecked ATC cambox off a machining center, I happened to be walking by, asked what he was up to...had been stoning/polishing/blueing a splined shaft that got burred up, was sticking- i mentioned old Joe's hammer trick for threads, said it should work for splines...tapped it radially about 10 times around and it slid like new- he was both shocked and pissed as he had been messing with it for hours :)

2) years back, had a big taper bearing ring stuck in a housing- like 18" diameter, had spun/froze pretty darn tight... our old welder saw us trying to rig a puller under the tiny lip provided, said 'if the bearings shot, I can get it out in 1 minute...but youll have to clean the housing'
he welded a few beads about 2" long around the center of the ring- soon as it started to cool off, heard a 'click' and he lifted it right out... I measured and the cooling of the weld shrunk it almost .005"!

just wanted to toss a couple out there, hope others that have came up with 'different' ways to attack problems (or worked with old guys that did) might chime in and share some ideas... a lot of these old guys are gone, hopefully some of their old neat ideas can be shared, might save someone else a lot of grief down the road.


personally, one of the ideas I was most proud of thinking about- 24 volt shorts are always a issue on our CNCs, finding one can be fun, as the home/overtravel switchers are all NC contacts, if one shorts, they all measure shorted... if you have a decent Fluke VOM with .01 ohm resolution, just start going down the terminal strip to ground... the shorted switch will read a couple hundredths or more of a ohm closer to zero. similarly for repairing ciircuit boards- had a couple old fanuc mother boards with a 5v short, did same thing, just probing around the board,,, within a few seconds knew within a 2" area where the short was, within a minute found a 3cent diode was the culprit...low ohms is very helpful at tracking down shorts with a lot of possible connections :)

The Artful Bodger
12-23-2014, 12:11 AM
We had an earthquake a few years ago that did a lot of damage and one of the things that happened was the rotary platform in a milking shed got dislodged from its supporting rollers. This was of considerable size constructed of concrete and steel and supported the weight of 50 cows while they were milked.

The platform had been fabricated in place and was proving very difficult to get back on the rollers. One of the farm workers, who was a recent immigrant from Afghanistan asked if he could try. He asked to use a welder then very quickly ran a series of beads using a dozen of so sticks to do so, then stood back. Five minutes later there was an almighty 'clang' and the platform was in place and ready for the afternoon milking.

Willy
12-23-2014, 12:33 AM
This should be an interesting thread. I'm sure there are a whole bunch of these types of tips and tricks that are not only interesting but very helpful as well in everyone's daily activities.
Bring em on, I need to make my life more simple.:)

The trick of finding shorts is one I have not tried yet but it I'll have to give that one a try next time I'm faced with a similar situation. Thanks.

The first two tips/tricks that you brought up have been very useful to me on many occasions over the years.
The last time was a variation of the weld bead on the bearing race trick.
Instead of a bearing raced locked into it's bore, on this occasion I used the same technique on a 2" ntp steel pipe nipple that had been broken off inside a bronze housing. Works well on threaded applications just as well as it does on pressed assemblies.

Kiwi
12-23-2014, 01:01 AM
On the old truck when it broke a half shaft instead of pulling the diff head down to get the broken off piece out we used to put some 8# wire in a length of garden hose just a little longer than the half shaft this was pushed up to the diff head and hook it up to the welder as soon as it struck an arc the welder was switched of the wire having no flux would then stick to the stub wire and hose was with drawn with the stub off the half shaft

PStechPaul
12-23-2014, 01:09 AM
Along the lines of using a low-resistance ohmmeter to find PCB shorts and shorted components, you can make a very effective continuity tester using a battery and an old-fashioned buzzer. It draws a fair amount of current, and the tone of the buzzer changes with resistance. It also sounds different when there is continuity through a transformer or motor winding, due to the inductance, and it can pick up shorted turns as well.

When powering up an unknown piece of electronics gear, connect something like a 100 watt incandescent lamp in series with the line. If there is a short, or it draws unexpectedly high current, the lamp will light and limit the current to about 1 amp. For 12 VDC automotive equipment, use an old headlamp.

I don't have very much experience in machining to be able to offer much along those lines.

macona
12-23-2014, 01:39 AM
Had a new circuit board at work just assembled and would not power up, a short somewhere. Tried tracing it down by resistance (4 wire meter) and nothing. Brought in one of my thermal infrared cameras and had a guy hold it over the board while I powered it up. Instantly I saw a hot spot on the board but no component. Flipped it over and tried it again and watched a diode light up bright when power was applied, it was installed backwards! The tech reinstalled it the right way and the board worked.

DATo
12-23-2014, 05:17 AM
OK, this is a simple one and you old-timers probably already know this trick but for any newbies it just might be of some value.

Long ago I had several workers who were recent graduates from tech school. One was boring a deep hole in our largest lathe. The boring bar which was about 1" diameter stuck out the front of the holder about 12" (required) and about an equal amount out the back (toward the tailstock). The cut was producing chatter that could be heard throughout the shop - a sort of crunchy squeal. The kid tried resharpening the tool in various geometries as well as played with the speed and feed till finally admitting defeat to me. Several other youngsters had by now joined the discussion with their own ideas all of which failed. The machine was running and the cacophony of racket continued unabated as we all stood around looking at it. After everyone had exhausted their opinions I told Denny to clamp a c-clamp to the ass end of the bar. He hesitated and everyone looked at me like I was nuts. I repeated my instruction and he did what I asked. Immediately the chatter ceased. The look on their faces was absolutely priceless. If I had a camera I would have prepared in advance and taken a picture of their faces and in the future, whenever they got cocky, I would have shown it to them. *LOL* There is no substitute for experience. (A vise grip works well too.)

EDIT: I like that welded bearing idea ... I like it a lot.

boslab
12-23-2014, 06:50 AM
I tend to have some bits of lead strip to wrap round boring bars to damp the resonance, we did have a few big ones in work that were made from heavy cored bar that were filled with lead shot to damp them, they were heavy but the lathe was 70' long with a 15' faceplate, no chuck, just bolting dogs.
Lead solder, the thick roll stuff plumbers use wrapped round works too.
I remember seeing a short detector that had a brass brush on to find the fault, never used one myself
Mark

John Stevenson
12-23-2014, 07:03 AM
Leather belt wrapped round a brake drum can stop the singing, just needs something to alter the frequency.

CarlByrns
12-23-2014, 07:36 AM
Leather belt wrapped round a brake drum can stop the singing, just needs something to alter the frequency.

Brake lathes in the US come with rubber belts (that have lead weights on them) for this- wide belts for drums, narrow for rotors.

tc429
12-23-2014, 07:38 AM
if you ever think a photoelectric switch might be burnt out, or your garage door wont close, or your tv remote dont work...look at the IREDs using a camera or most phones (older iphones wont work), they see infrared as bright purple... same for fiberoptic interface cables on older fanuc controls- unplug one end, power up, one fiber should be bright purple, plug that back in, unplug other end it should have one bright fiber...if one end shows both dark, unplug the other end, look into the socket- if it is bright, the fiber is busted, if dark the IREDs are burnt out...

i fixed my neighbors garage door 10 yrs ago- took my camcorder and saw the photoeye was dead, took a IRED out of a old tv remote, and swapped it, he was dumbfounded :)

CarlByrns
12-23-2014, 07:42 AM
Full floater axles (one ton and up) can be a real bear to get out- you can pry on them for hours without movement. Or you can give the end cap a quick tap with a heavy headed hammer (for Sir John: 'eavy 'eaded 'ammer ) and the axle will pop right out.

loose nut
12-23-2014, 09:47 AM
clamp a c-clamp to the ass end of the bar.

Which end is the ass end??????

olcop
12-23-2014, 09:49 AM
The one that don't cut.
olcop

fixerup
12-23-2014, 10:18 AM
For those of you that still use a hacksaw.

Here is the usual scenario :
You have a piece of material which has a decent surface finish which will not need touching up and will look good on your project.
You need to cut a chunk off with the hacksaw, you carefully mark the needed piece and then on you first stroke with the hack saw, it slides across and scuff the surface finish !#@!#

Here is my tip: First for these careful cutting situation I like to put the hacksaw blade cutting on the pull stroke. Then put one hand on the handle and with the other hand put 3 fingers on top of the hacksaw blade, right over the cutting area then apply a very small pressure and carefully start cutting until you have a decent groove and the chances of slipping off will be less.

Phil

MikeL46
12-23-2014, 11:59 AM
Just a simple idea from an old machinist at work:

Put the drill bits in a drill index with the sharp points down. The bits will not hit and nick each other as you remove/replace them. Nor will you nick your finger.

Mike

Black Forest
12-23-2014, 12:08 PM
Just a simple idea from an old machinist at work:

Put the drill bits in a drill index with the sharp points down. The bits will not hit and nick each other as you remove/replace them. Nor will you nick your finger.

Mike

Mike that is why you should never sharpen your drill bits. Since I stopped sharpening my drill bits I haven't cut my finger one time selecting a drill bit.!:eek:

Old Hat
12-23-2014, 12:08 PM
For those of you that still use a hacksaw.

Here is the usual scenario :
You have a piece of material which has a decent surface finish which will not need touching up and will look good on your project.
You need to cut a chunk off with the hacksaw, you carefully mark the needed piece and then on you first stroke with the hack saw, it slides across and scuff the surface finish !#@!#

Here is my tip: First for these careful cutting situation I like to put the hacksaw blade cutting on the pull stroke. Then put one hand on the handle and with the other hand put 3 fingers on top of the hacksaw blade, right over the cutting area then apply a very small pressure and carefully start cutting until you have a decent groove and the chances of slipping off will be less.

Phil

+1 for the Pull Stroke.

boslab
12-23-2014, 12:41 PM
A sharp drill bit is such a novel idea, it may catch on
Mark

mickeyf
12-23-2014, 01:26 PM
Very first post: Reason for my sig line, true story.

hermetic
12-23-2014, 05:22 PM
MickeyF, Your sig reminds me of an incident during my apprenticeship, a senior electrician and myself were running SWA cable up the wooden gangway of a sand maiden, which is a huge wet quarry machine which washes sand, it was winter, cold, and the cable would not lie straight and flat. He went to his car and came back with a large boxwood mallet, and said to me "remember lad, never(whap) hit(whap) F*cking (whap) Cables"
Phil

boslab
12-23-2014, 06:03 PM
I've hit a few, but was surprised the electricians were using a pipe bender on big steel wire armoured cables once, don't know if it's a normal thing but it works, it was a thick cable mind
M

Cuttings
12-23-2014, 07:55 PM
This could turn out to be one of the favorite threads with lots of useful information.
I have a couple of things to add. The one about welding on bearings to get them out of a bore, which I have used a lot, brought another tip to mind.
I was finishing up replacing the head on Cat diesel with overhead cams years ago bolting the lid on the cam box when one of the 3/8 bolts that go through the lid and the cam box broke off at the top of the threads,.
The remaining piece was about 4 " down inside the bolt hole. We got the welder over stuck a 1/8 welding rod down the hole being sure to use a rod that did not have iron power in the flux so the flux would insulate the rod from the side of the bolt hole.
With the ground clamp off the block I pushed the rod down until it touched the the top of the broken bolt then lifted it up slightly. The welder then put the ground on the block for a few seconds, enough to get a good arc going, then took it off again.
We let it cool then bent the top of the rod over 90 and unscrewed the piece of the bolt. If that had not worked it would have been a 3 to 4 hour job to disassemble the engine back down to the top of the block, remove the broken bolt and build it back up again.

My second item is a trick I learned from a machinist at a long established local machine shop.
To remove a broken bolt that appears to be rusted into place. Heat the bolt to red hot with an appropriate torch then touch it with a piece of para wax.
The wax when very hot gets fluid enough to travel down the threads. Let it cool, then most of the time you can unscrew the broken piece.

Weston Bye
12-23-2014, 08:11 PM
Not machining, but on a machine: I happened by on more than one occasion when the techs were puzzling over a machine that just stopped - wouldn't complete a cycle. After looking things over, I borrowed a screwdriver and turned it backward and gave the programmable controller (PLC) a hefty clunk on its face with the screwdriver handle. The machine started and ran perfectly. I got the "huh?" look from the techs and responded with the silent smug look.

The secret was that the PLC had relay outputs and occasionally the contacts on a relay would weld shut. A sharp rap would usually break the weld loose. I recommended that they replace the relay, but they never did and the machine ran for years thereafter.

mattthemuppet
12-23-2014, 08:37 PM
I haven't been machining long enough to offer tips, but here are a couple of general ones:

- after working in the shop/ garage always wash your hands before touching your todger

- when you're about to finish up a long project or put something back together, take a break, have a coffee, whatever. Just don't push on thinking "I've got this, it's easy, I can taste that beer already" because you'll probably screw it up.

gld
12-23-2014, 09:21 PM
That good ole hammer. Works on stubborn bolts and screws that just don't want to break loose.

HWooldridge
12-23-2014, 10:33 PM
Not machining but still a good kink:

My first job out of college involved running lots of plenum cable above drop-in ceilings for fire alarm and CCTV systems. Most techs would take down a few tiles and fish the wires across but I came up with a much faster way. I got a cheap Zebco spinning reel and taped a lead ball to the monofilament line then used a "wrist rocket" slingshot to fire the ball across the entire ceiling. My workmate (Brad) would pull one tile wherever the cable needed to go and I'd shoot for the opening. He would tie a pull cord to the fishing line then I would reel it back. I always aimed over ducts and light fixtures and rarely missed a shot. The last step was to tie all the necessary cables to the line and pull them across the ceiling.

Our employer had a contract with the old Eckerd's Drugstore chain; Brad and I installed many of the locations within Texas. We got so fast at it that nobody else could compete on time unless they used some of our same installation tricks. Another thing we did was build templates for all of the alarm devices and camera mounts. I made up several plates with sharp punch tips on bolt hole centers. We would place the template on the wall and level it then whack the plate with a plastic mallet. Every mounting hole would then be transferred to the wall for easy installation. Brad also had a habit of putting pigtails on all of the devices while I was driving the truck to the work site. We would arrive and be able to crimp "butter bean" connectors on all of the low voltage circuits without any extra work.

The good tradesmen are the ones lazy enough to come up with time saving tips in their respective work - the guy/girl doing it daily will usually have the best ideas how to do the job.

tc429
12-23-2014, 10:56 PM
Not machining, but on a machine: I happened by on more than one occasion when the techs were puzzling over a machine that just stopped - wouldn't complete a cycle. After looking things over, I borrowed a screwdriver and turned it backward and gave the programmable controller (PLC) a hefty clunk on its face with the screwdriver handle. The machine started and ran perfectly. I got the "huh?" look from the techs and responded with the silent smug look.

The secret was that the PLC had relay outputs and occasionally the contacts on a relay would weld shut. A sharp rap would usually break the weld loose. I recommended that they replace the relay, but they never did and the machine ran for years thereafter.

old Fanuc 6 series CNCs have little relays that look like chips with the center 4 pins missing-99% of the time they are what screw up...I found just gently 'strumming' a plastic screwdriver handle across the rows of relays frees them right up- many machines have two connection units though, you need to drop the front one part way out to get to the rear board. I built a testrig/wrote a test ladder to echo inputs to outputs, with LEDS to show which one failed, my buddy in Tennessee still uses it to test every board he repairs, letting them run the test sequence 24 hours before shipping them out... I had almost 1000 feet of that little friggin 30 gage wire wrapped in that thing...about went crosseyed wiring that thing up- and the 1981 'suitcase' programmer sucked- no memory, all typed mnemonics... took 2 days just to type in the ladder to burn the chips, was a fun project I wouldnt care to repeat :)


anyways- man I LOVE that slingshot idea... shoulda thought of that a few weeks ago was running some extra wiring in my basement...that could save TONS of time- theyve been adding cameras at work, I'll be sure to mention to the building maint guys- long as they dont hit a sprinkler head, it should be a great timesaver :)

tc429
12-23-2014, 11:17 PM
another broken bolt trick- but requires a highly skilled welder- ive seen dozens of broken off bolts removed easily by our weder Leroy, he is one extremely talented fabricator and a heck of a great welder... he will put like a 3/8 nut over a broken 1/2" bolt- usually broken below the surface maybe 1/8"- he'll weld a tiny 'bubble' in the middle, slowly building it up to the nut height, then fills it solid, just unscrews it with a wrench...usually strong enough to straighten out that buggered up first thread or two the first try= if it breaks he just does it again, never seen him have to weld more than two on, and never seen him miss, but no way would I ever try it if he was available :)

cleanly broken bolts, I often use a really thin dremel cutoff disk to slot the busted piece- yes, it butchers the part a bit by slightly notching the sides of the hole, but most stuff isnt that critical...oil it/work it back and forth with a screwdriver and the notches help cut the buggered up first thread... faster than drilling it out.
along similar lines, if you have something with a messed up threaded hole, and no way to get a tap down in there, just take a dremel and add a little cut or two to the first thread or two of the bolt you are trying to use- often that little bit of relief/'soft cutting edge' will shave out a slightly burred thread...
left hand drills are great for removing broken bolts too, usually when they break thru and grab, they spin the broken piece out before you can stop the drill... I prefer to drill a pilot just slightly smaller than the left hander to make it tend to grab...

tc429
12-23-2014, 11:35 PM
as a option to gasket cement (especially silicone- i hate silicone) on machined parts like gearbox/spindle housings, etc...I have seen sooooo many parts damaged/busted by maintenance guys trying to remove big parts 'glued' with silicone... for Gods sake, please drill and tap a jack hole if silicone must be used...anyways, my new favorite, and Ive convinced our maintenance guys over the last ten years, dont use silicone- get that white ptfe pipe dope, non hardening, it seals fine, separates easily, and scrapes off cleanly/easily... even my diehard silicone loving buddies have seen how much easier it is to separate the pipe dope stuff compared to silicone, and agree it dont leak- yes its messy, but at least it wipes up pretty easy :)

on the subject of sealing- bet there are a lot of folks that have never heard of CR Speedi-Sleeves... Chicago Rawhide has sold them forever, if you get a shaft with a grooved seal area, press one of these chromed stainless ultrathin sleeves over it and go...they come with a installing tool(usually too short, but easily made from tube stock) after pressing it on, rip the scored flange off and done...a lot cheaper than cutting/chroming/grinding, and they pretty much last forever.

a similar repair product is 'tolerance rings' for mounting bearings. 30 yrs ago we had some huge 20 spindle geared drill heads built, were always spinning bearings, very expensive to repair- one of our guys stumbled on these, punched out the bores, the darn thing ran for years...after that all heads we had built new with the gooy rings in them- they look like corrugated metal, but crush fla when the bearing is pressed in- thing is they 'spring' so tight even high rpm/severe vibration that might spin a typical pressed bearing after a year or so will not loosen them up- kinda a sloppy fix device that can be better than 'doing it right' in some severe applications.

38_Cal
12-23-2014, 11:53 PM
Similar to tc429's Dremel tool trick, rather than use a cutoff disc, my dentist saves drills/cutters for me that are worn a bit, and I use them to slot the small (#6-48 and 8-40) screws used in gun work for sight and scope mounting when the heads go away from too much torque...or too much Loctite.

boslab
12-24-2014, 12:25 AM
Making silver solder, half the weight of silver in cartridge brass, eg 10g silver needs 5g brass, melt into a blob or better in a little crucible or on the back of a ceramic tile with a gas torch, oxy torch or whatever, once cooled hammer it flat, handy if you run out on a weekend
Mark

kendall
12-24-2014, 12:35 AM
If you have a rusty bolt or nut and finally get it to turn, do not stop, as soon as you do it will seize.
No idea how often I see people take a break because they 'finally got it loose', only to have it snap off after their break.

Paul Alciatore
12-24-2014, 01:08 AM
+ 2! I always use the pull stroke on a hacksaw.


+1 for the Pull Stroke.

Doggie
12-24-2014, 01:09 AM
Tried to make a few ideas here,,, my logged in time does not allow me enough to me to type up a post and allow me to post it
Girrrrrrrr I give up, just cannot be done here.

tc429
12-24-2014, 01:10 AM
craziest repair I ever saw- many many years ago, we were in dire straits at work financially, they werent buying anything... one of the towmotors spun a rod bearing started knocking bad- our towmotor guy was a old Hungarian guy, spoke little english 'fokken chitty' was usually all I could make out...anyway he had some old blacksmithish mechanical skills...if all he had was a rock, i bet he could make a tool out of it...
anyways, he took the pan off in the truck, took two rod caps off, pushed the pistons up, wrapped emery cloth around the crank pin, bolted the two rod caps together with allthread rod around it, used the threadedrod like a lever, rocked it back and forth... in 2 days he had that crankpin round within a half thou, poured molten lead/tin around a piece of stock, inside the rod caps with the old damaged shells still in them, bored the assembly to the new weird diameter, filed a notch thru the babbit so he could take the caps off, picked the new babbitted shell out of the one 'good' cap, and put it back together. 3 days time and no parts... I thought it was a insanely slow way to do anything, but his brother who spoke english said they used to fix tractors on the farm that way all the time, wasnt a big deal... wow

I'm sure that motors been rebuilt since, can only wonder what a engine shop would think upon teardown, seeing that odd diameter crankpin :) just goes to show you though, with patience and perseverance, just about anythings possible

Paul Alciatore
12-24-2014, 01:20 AM
I did similar cable runs in many of my workplaces. I came up with a similar technique that I called the "spear chucker". Tie the cable to a piece of 1X1 and pop up a ceiling tile. Toss it as far as you can and pop up another one at that location and "chuck" it again.

It started as just an effort to reach for another tile or two, but I could get it 20 feet or more with one "chuck". Past AC ducts, over other wires, past almost any obstacles. Almost never damaged any ceiling tiles as you may have thought we would. And replacements are cheap compared to labor.

If the cable was too heavy, we used a lighter pull wire or cord.




Not machining but still a good kink:

My first job out of college involved running lots of plenum cable above drop-in ceilings for fire alarm and CCTV systems. Most techs would take down a few tiles and fish the wires across but I came up with a much faster way. I got a cheap Zebco spinning reel and taped a lead ball to the monofilament line then used a "wrist rocket" slingshot to fire the ball across the entire ceiling. My workmate (Brad) would pull one tile wherever the cable needed to go and I'd shoot for the opening. He would tie a pull cord to the fishing line then I would reel it back. I always aimed over ducts and light fixtures and rarely missed a shot. The last step was to tie all the necessary cables to the line and pull them across the ceiling.

Our employer had a contract with the old Eckerd's Drugstore chain; Brad and I installed many of the locations within Texas. We got so fast at it that nobody else could compete on time unless they used some of our same installation tricks. Another thing we did was build templates for all of the alarm devices and camera mounts. I made up several plates with sharp punch tips on bolt hole centers. We would place the template on the wall and level it then whack the plate with a plastic mallet. Every mounting hole would then be transferred to the wall for easy installation. Brad also had a habit of putting pigtails on all of the devices while I was driving the truck to the work site. We would arrive and be able to crimp "butter bean" connectors on all of the low voltage circuits without any extra work.

The good tradesmen are the ones lazy enough to come up with time saving tips in their respective work - the guy/girl doing it daily will usually have the best ideas how to do the job.

CarlByrns
12-24-2014, 07:12 AM
Working as a mechanic in the Rust Belt, you learn quickly how to free rusted fasteners. Honda used to locate the brake rotor to the hub with a flathead screw. If it didn't budge with a hammer-style impact, the drill was to heat the screw head red-hot with the brazing torch, let it cool and it would come right out.

Ford used to have a large (2" or so) captured nut that held a pipe to the EGR valve. When the valve failed, the nut would be locked in by rust and exhaust-gas solids. The trick here was to work quickly-heat the nut with the torch as hot as possible and then immediately cool it with water (from a hose). Get a wrench on it and that nut would screw right off. We always did this with two guys- it's a pretty narrow window of opportunity.

Richard King
12-24-2014, 08:17 AM
I have a couple. years ago i was reaming holes (straight reamer) on a shear break base and the reamer was getting dull and an old time came over and said hand me you reamer. He walked over to the lathe and grabbed a tool bit and to my surprise used the bottom of it, not the ground sharp side and ran it over the top of the sharp edge but dulled now edge of the HSS reamer and it pushed the rolled over sharp edge back and I had a sharp reamer again.

Another when your drilling holes in a drill press and plan on tapping them by hand later. After you drill the hole, take out the drill and put your tap in the chuck gripping on the round shinny area and eitherr by hand turn in a few threads to start the tap straight or you can power tap the hole. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I95YrmVUL18
Merry Christams everyone! Rich

Old Hat
12-24-2014, 09:10 AM
I need to go the other way.
Any clever Ideas for marking out a total of 12 wires on each end
in two welders and two pedals?

Most assortments are going to cost half of what I paid for a third RFC 23 pedal.
I just want to get all the wiring identical, and may not need any wiring identified again.

So far an assortment of colored shrink tubes seems the simplest.
================

I can delete this post after I find a good lead or idea, and leave the tip/idea up,
to keep the thread on track.

Fasttrack
12-24-2014, 10:15 AM
This is a great post and the reason why I keep coming back to the HSM forum. There really is no substitute for experience, but with posts like this even the inexperienced can benefit from other's experience. I'm fairly young but I've made quite an impression at my new work because I'm full of YOUR tips and tricks. In my mind, it's these tips and tricks that really make a machinist. Anyone can learn how to press buttons or crank wheels, it's knowing all the tricks to tackle unusual or stubborn problems that make a "true" machinist. Really a great resource here - thanks to everyone who contributes and thanks to HSM for keeping the forum up!

Tip for turning thin parts:
This one I picked up here several years ago but it has been a huge help. When turning or milling thin parts, you can hold them in place with double-sided carpet tape. Milling is a little bit touch-and-go but it works great in a lathe. Either switch to a faceplate or take the jaws out of the chuck and tape the part to the faceplate/chuck face. Use a center and a piece of scrap with a center hole to apply pressure to the part. This works great for making large diameter circles quickly. I rough cut them in a bandsaw and then chuck them up in the lathe as described above. I grind a trepanning tool and plunge right in to cut a nice clean circle.

Now, one of the first things I throw in my machinist "ready" boxes is a roll of double-sided tape. I've found that "carpet" tape works the best, but you will need some aggressive solvent to clean the residue.

Wayne Sippola
12-24-2014, 10:54 AM
Excellent thread!

Here's one for drilling on a lathe and starting a twist drill on center without using a center drill - mount a small bar in the tool post which is then fed in with the cross slide to deflect the tip of the drill slightly. Feed the drill into the work slightly and as you feed more in, back off the pusher bar. If the drill wobbles, try it again. You can get the twist drill to center just fine this way.

And I think I read it here about freeing ball joint tapers by rapping on the side of the part the taper is mounted in - it was new to me, but after using the technique about 10 times in the last couple weeks on 3 different vehicles, I have to say it works very well and saved me a lot of grief. The danged things just drop right out!

Richard King
12-24-2014, 10:59 AM
I have used double face tape to surface grind plastics like Rulon, Turcite, Phenolic. Dress a very course wheel open or rough and don't use coolant, take thin cuts so it stays cool.

boslab
12-24-2014, 11:01 AM
Reminds me of sharpening a knife on the bottom of a ceramic mug, it works!, broken electrical insulators work too, esp the round rod on ceramic thermocouples, very handy for stoning dies and such
Mark

Ed ke6bnl
12-24-2014, 11:09 AM
Excellent thread!

Here's one for drilling on a lathe and starting a twist drill on center without using a center drill - mount a small bar in the tool post which is then fed in with the cross slide to deflect the tip of the drill slightly. Feed the drill into the work slightly and as you feed more in, back off the pusher bar. If the drill wobbles, try it again. You can get the twist drill to center just fine this way.


And I think I read it here about freeing ball joint tapers by rapping on the side of the part the taper is mounted in - it was new to me, but after using the technique about 10 times in the last couple weeks on 3 different vehicles, I have to say it works very well and saved me a lot of grief. The danged things just drop right out!

I usually put some pressure on the tapper joint in the direction it should go and then tap the side of the taper joint.

dp
12-24-2014, 11:15 AM
Tried to make a few ideas here,,, my logged in time does not allow me enough to me to type up a post and allow me to post it
Girrrrrrrr I give up, just cannot be done here.

There are two remedies for this problem. Select the "Remember me" box when you log in and you will remain logged in until you log yourself out. Create your post in a local editor such as Notepad for Windows or TextEdit for Mac then copy/paste your text into a post. An alternative is to send yourself your text as an email then copy/paste the email to your post here.

Ian B
12-24-2014, 11:40 AM
Find some of this stuff:

http://www.afsrecoil.net/threadrepair/en/Products/Complementary_Products/ReGrip.html

I first found it in a shop in Cairo, and have had it in my toolbox ever since. It's one of those products that you only believe in once you've actually tried it. it's a suspension of silicone carbide (crystals?), sort of looks like grinding compound. One drop on the end of a screwdriver, and what you thought was a chewed up head makes you think someone just welded the screw & driver together.

*Wonderful* stuff...

Ian

CarlByrns
12-24-2014, 12:03 PM
Valve grinding compound on the tip of a screwdriver will give it a lot of grip on a stripped head.

Coated welding rod is great for honing a knife.

To thoroughly and safely clean an old carb, mix 50/50 distilled water and lemon juice in a pot and boil the carb castings for one hour. Rinse and boil again in distilled water for an hour. Do this outside and watch the liquid level- it will need constant replenishing. You'll be amazed at the results.

mickeyf
12-24-2014, 12:20 PM
For those of you that still use a hacksaw.

I get hacksaw handles at yard sales, generally no more than 25 cents or half a buck. I have one each with 14 tpi, 18tpi, 24, 32, abrasive grit blade, and abrasive grit rod. Why spend time changing blades?

Also, angle grinders, which are more of a time waster to change. Met a stone carver who must have had a dozen. I have one each of grinding wheel, wire wheel, flapper disk, sanding disk. Next time they're on sale I may get one for a cut off disk.

mickeyf
12-24-2014, 12:33 PM
This post (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/65433-small-drilling) reminded me of how I used to drill circuit boards. I had one of those stands that "turns your hand drill into a drill press", Kind like this one (http://www.amazon.com/45140-Drill-8-Inch-Electric-Cordless/sim/B0007KQY7G/2), build an adapter so that it would hold a Dremel tool rather than a drill, and used carbide dental bits that my dentist friend had given me. No longer have it, so no picture, but the adapter was basically a short length of pipe cut lengthwise to hold the cylindrical body of the Dremel tool, with some clamping added.

A.K. Boomer
12-24-2014, 01:16 PM
Excellent thread!


And I think I read it here about freeing ball joint tapers by rapping on the side of the part the taper is mounted in - it was new to me, but after using the technique about 10 times in the last couple weeks on 3 different vehicles, I have to say it works very well and saved me a lot of grief. The danged things just drop right out!


If you want to perfect this method without taxing any other components that the hub or whatever is mounted too,

get a back up hand held sledge 180 degree's from the other hammer your using, the other hammer should be a medium sized ball peen for it's solid density - do not use the ball peen side,

your goal is to set up a very fast frequency in which the smaller hammer mildly distorts the taper and as tapers go will cause a quick release each time...

and yes it's very beneficial to have pressure on the tapers end --- sometimes design geometry permits with almost no further tools needed --- I.E. lower control arm ball joint tapers can be conveniently located just under the massive part of the C.V. joint hub that does not have any boot in the way, simply undue the LCA castle nut, place it on backwards most all the way - place the appropriate sized spacer in-between and back nut back out till you have good resistance - then get your ball peen and hand sledge and it will usually "pop" with the first couple hits, if not then check your castle nut tension and try again... never had one i could not get off this way as it's just a matter of time...

Old Hat
12-24-2014, 01:36 PM
The above are the words of a true Mechanic.:cool:
Amazing what a little shock~wave or two or three can accomplish. No?

Guido
12-24-2014, 01:53 PM
In trying to get along with the machine shop boss, we would usually answer his question of 'how soon do you need it?' by saying 'no big hurry, anytime next week'

Probably the worst answer to have given. When I complained about the number of hours shop time estimated, versus the actual hours charged, it was pointed out that 'no big hurry requests' would invariably slop over to be finished on Friday afternoon. If machine time was estimated to take, say, 2 hours and the job was completed by 4:00, guess whose time sheet contained the dead hour while waiting for 5:00 quitting time???

A.K. Boomer
12-24-2014, 02:25 PM
My machining tips are mostly pretty dangerous and not even attempted by the most experienced (for good reason) so i will try to refrain from adding much to this topic...


machining is just basically an end to a means for me and I really do not enjoy it much, I just look at my equipment with ALL the possibilities in mind and that type of thinking is a little too far out of the box to be safe...

doing stuff like mixing up your chuck jaws on your three jaw to come up with different kinds of eccentrics to be used in "lathe mode" is not recommended at all, (even though there's tons of possibilities and a plethora of combinations) I don't recommend this even to extremely experienced machinists due to the fact that it's a judgement call as to how the jaws are gripping the part and what size part it is and material type,,, when you offset jaws like this it no longer is a 120 degree holding capability plus the flats in the jaws are on their edges, the more extreme the offset the more extreme the degree of deviation ratio,

Still - if there's a short cut I will find it, it's just how im wired and I can't help that, Im also gifted with pretty good judgement of what i can and can't get away with, i think simply due to the fact that iv been pushing the envelope that way most all my life,,, and if there's any real doubt then im cranking my mills handles behind a 4by8 1/2" thick piece of plywood,,, and im not even going to bring up what I was doing then...

over the years it's saved me either thousands of hours and/or from buying unneeded stuff and that's the part I do get excited about and don't find boring... just is what it is...

Peter N
12-24-2014, 02:44 PM
When using drills, keep the pointy side towards the work..

tc429
12-24-2014, 02:45 PM
fixed my busted lathe transmission by making a part in the lathe?

when I got my old Leblond 17x48 lathe, it was a freebie from work...someone had crashed it, busted the input shaft in half. with a rube goldberg setup of 2x4s hose clamps and a old belt, I rigged the spindle to run off a hand drill driving around the chuck, turned up the new shaft... couldnt spline it, used the mill to slot it lengthwise and roll pinned a single key in it to drive one spline tooth(diameters were fitted to minor diameters of the gears) almost 20 yrs later, it still works and shifts :)

we had a old fixed rpm production lathe at work, they used to rig up a vfd to cut chuck jaws once in a blue moon... someone damaged the drive, machine was down for chuck runout(soft jaws) after a spindle swap, no drive... I did the same mickey mouse belt trick i'd used at home on my lathe, but used a 1/2 hp milwaukee mag base drill, turned the jaws really easily... inside guards were slanted, but a belt dont care, ran it with about a 30 degree twist around the chuck :)

someone mentioned chatter on boring bars- many yrs ago we had tooled up for a pontiac cast wheel, to eliminate turret, came up with a long/backwards Jbar to do the bore on same station as od turn...it chattered BAD. rpm/feed/depth of cut wouldnt change it- always screamed at about the same sounding frequency... as there was clearance under the hub, I welded a slug on the cutting end of the bar, stuck out 2" past the insert- no chatter... anything that changes the mass will change the frequency, ugly, but it worked :)

tc429
12-24-2014, 03:05 PM
speaking of rube goldberg stuff... I picked up a set of junk hydraulic lift tables with three phase motors, intended to use them to pull the body off our 65 galaxie...at the time we had a LOT of 'stuff' going on at home, budget was tight (newborn had 3 open hearts, capped insurance- lived on credit cards a couple years till we dug out of that one), took off the three phase motors, bought two cheep harbor freight hand drills- chucked the pump shafts, mounted the drills on a rubber pad with ubolts, 110 adjustable speed lifts :) they got used a LOT on the galaxie, again last yr hanging my mustang on a rotisserie, and once to pull the tranny out of my 06 mustang last yr to swap the clutch...handy tools, saved from the junkyard :)

lots of folks shy away from three phase stuff for home as it can cost a lot to convert... but for intermittent duty, a cheap drill motor can be used for a lot of stuff :)

I got a Deckel tool grinder from the scrapheap too- didnt need it, but couldnt stand seeing it lying in the mud...rebuilt it, to run the 380v3phase motor, I just put a boatload of caps from hot to third leg, run it on 120...it spools up very slow, but once it hits about half speed it zooms right up, has adequate power for grinding.

my bridgeport has a Fanuc CNC on it- it was gutted when I saved it from the scrapheap, control cost a pretty penny to put back together...it runs on a 120 volt plug. I put a transformer inside to buck the 120 up to about 170, and on the old Fanuc 6047 DC or 6050 AC three phase drives, power goes in on terminals A-1-2... if you jumper 1-2 to one leg and A to the other, they will run at reduced rapid rates on 170-185 volts single phase :) use at own risk, but Ive ran a lot of drives that way. I made up a 'jogbox' at work to drive servos on down machines to move the slides, it uses a 120 volt plug, will run a big size 20 servo motor to move slides/test motors/fold robots up... I used a small DC tach generator as a voltage reference, put a MPG handle on it, cranking generates dc to move the drive reference either direction- maintenance uses it all the time...its heavy, actually welded the enclosure to a two wheel dolly- with xfmr and all, probably weighs 300#

mooney1el
12-24-2014, 03:32 PM
Find some of this stuff:

http://www.afsrecoil.net/threadrepair/en/Products/Complementary_Products/ReGrip.html

I first found it in a shop in Cairo, and have had it in my toolbox ever since. It's one of those products that you only believe in once you've actually tried it. it's a suspension of silicone carbide (crystals?), sort of looks like grinding compound. One drop on the end of a screwdriver, and what you thought was a chewed up head makes you think someone just welded the screw & driver together.

*Wonderful* stuff...

Ian

For those of us in the US, I use this product : Screw Grab from this website; http://align-rite.com/screw-grab.html

Old Hat
12-24-2014, 03:53 PM
Shop Engine Hoist "ImprUved"

Bigger Wheels, better for traversing cracks.
More rigid, less flex under Load.
A Miller thunderbolt and a power hacksaw and a Me was all it took.
http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p92/swadge/Copyof000_1136.jpg (http://s126.photobucket.com/user/swadge/media/Copyof000_1136.jpg.html)
http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p92/swadge/000_1137.jpg (http://s126.photobucket.com/user/swadge/media/000_1137.jpg.html)
http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p92/swadge/Copyof000_1138.jpg (http://s126.photobucket.com/user/swadge/media/Copyof000_1138.jpg.html)

Willy
12-24-2014, 04:19 PM
Excellent thread!...

.......
And I think I read it here about freeing ball joint tapers by rapping on the side of the part the taper is mounted in - it was new to me, but after using the technique about 10 times in the last couple weeks on 3 different vehicles, I have to say it works very well and saved me a lot of grief. The danged things just drop right out!

I believe that perhaps you may have been referring to this post I left in the welding forum about a month ago.
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/65138-opinions-on-heating-cast-iron-with-a-torch?p=950385#post950385

The OP never replied so I'm not sure if it helped him or not but I'm glad to see it helped you.
I've learned so much here from the vast knowledge base on this site so I'm always happy if I can give back a little bit now and then.
I don't frequent other forums much as I know someone here will always be able to shed a little ray of sunshine on just about any topic I've come across.
Thanks all for sharing the benefits of your experience.:)

A.K. Boomer
12-24-2014, 04:31 PM
Had a new circuit board at work just assembled and would not power up, a short somewhere. Tried tracing it down by resistance (4 wire meter) and nothing. Brought in one of my thermal infrared cameras and had a guy hold it over the board while I powered it up. Instantly I saw a hot spot on the board but no component. Flipped it over and tried it again and watched a diode light up bright when power was applied, it was installed backwards! The tech reinstalled it the right way and the board worked.

I like that - that's just plain slick and have thought about it for an abundance of different things but simply do not own anything I know of that would let me do that...

although have used the hand held point and shoot thermometers to do similar stuff --- good duty...



Edit; sometimes it's right in front of your face and you don't have to search the board as was the case with this one subaru I had to fix, mild draw that was taking down the battery after few days of car being parked - FWIW equivalent to about a half a dome lights worth

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC03100_zps5733a3d5.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/AK_Boomer/media/DSC03100_zps5733a3d5.jpg.html)

Diagnoses is fairly simple and straight forward --- keep your amp draw meter between the battery cable and the battery and start plucking fuses - when you hit you at least have it narrowed down to the particular circuit, put fuse back in,
then go to that circuit and everything that it controls and start unplugging stuff one by one, when you hit you know you have the energy pig,,,

in this case it was a spilled soft drink from a year before --- cup holder hangs out right above the radio lol

you can see traces of the drink and the conductive fungus it created,,, radio as also warm to the touch when I went to pull it...

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC03111_zps475ff715.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/AK_Boomer/media/DSC03111_zps475ff715.jpg.html)

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC03107_zps7df52f1e.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/AK_Boomer/media/DSC03107_zps7df52f1e.jpg.html)


A good clean up and a replacement of one or two small resistors is all it took, this was not just saving a good kenwood but also letting them avoid a 1,000 dollar satellite system that was all interlinked and would have needed to be taken in for the full up-grade...

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC03113_zpscab4df45.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/AK_Boomer/media/DSC03113_zpscab4df45.jpg.html)

tc429
12-24-2014, 05:07 PM
Shop Engine Hoist "ImprUved"

Bigger Wheels, better for traversing cracks.
More rigid, less flex under Load.
A Miller thunderbolt and a power hacksaw and a Me was all it took.




love the heavy frame. My old cherry picker had a couple mods- on the front I welded the casters straight, one heck of a lot easier to steer from one end. back in the early 90's me and two buddies had a small rebuild shop- the cherry picker became a light duty hoist- we rebuilt a old wasino lathe, I bought a 8' piece of 2x2x1/4 to make a longer arm, and put a counterweight on the tail end- turret only weighed a few hundred pounds, but it worked great for picking the machine down.

I'd always meant to replace those fronts with larger diameter wheels, had pictured a 'axle' with two wheels per leg- like the single inside the tube much better- you just made me add one more thing to my to-do list :)

RichardG
12-24-2014, 05:09 PM
When cutting a taper with the compound use a speed wrench to turn it makes for a nice even cut .
Richard

Old Hat
12-24-2014, 05:17 PM
I'd always meant to replace those fronts with larger diameter wheels, had pictured a 'axle' with two wheels per leg- like the single inside the tube much better-
you just made me add one more thing to my to-do list :)

Adding another volume to my to-do list with this thread.;)

ps 429, anything to do with engines? a 429 intercepter a friend had comes to mind.

tc429
12-24-2014, 05:19 PM
on the subject of tools for cars- heres some pics of the old lift tables and cradles I made to pull the body off our old galaxie in '04, and more recently to hang my 69 mustang...my junkyard rotisserie might be insanely heavy duty, but long as the car dont break in half its definitely secure

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5347/9442001734_42a3742afa_z.jpg

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7290/9439196431_60653e86f2_z.jpg

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2811/9381501420_7d545e2554_z.jpg

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2845/9429539099_18c299b969_z.jpg

tc429
12-24-2014, 05:25 PM
first car was a 69 429 4V ex cop car...mom bought it when I was 8, I wrecked it in 1981- still have the motor, still plan on putting it in the old mustang I tore apart back in '84... just fnally got stated last year, but stopped 2 months later to rebuild a pickup for a 15yr old son...

love those old 11:1 429s... by far the strongest motor Ive ever driven, 480 ft/lb off idle and revs like a smallblock due to the scant 3.59" stroke... only two engines over 400 CID with a rod/stroke ratio over 1.8:1 are the 429 ford and 426 chrysler- the low rod angles let them scream...

Old Hat
12-24-2014, 05:35 PM
+1 on 429s which brings me to a Question.
I had to buy a beater one fall day when my good car had a bad day.
I found a 1968 Custom 500 Ex squad car, 390 2V dual exhaust for $280.
Nothing appeared to have been modified under the hood.

I wasn't in the best of cituations at that time, and was going to be late for
a promising interview in Milwaukee. I've never been in any other
original equipment car that moved like that ever! 429 included.

makes me wonder what a 4barrel is for? LoL

I got to the interview with a few minutes to spare and a way high heart rate.

tc429
12-24-2014, 05:37 PM
more of the rotisserie- note the top beam is installed 'wrong' so it will roll out the doors, when done can flip it 'normal' but erecting inside the garage would be a bear- think the beam alone is probably >700#

the side posts were 3x6, I shortened them as 15' tall was excessive, welded the stubs back on to make 6x6, rotated 90 so I could bore 4" holes thru for the pivot pins... you wanna hear chatter? try a 4" holesaw thru 1/4 wall tubing- my God that was loud...lennox makes awesome hole saws by the way- Ive hole sawed thru inch thick iron machine bases many times with them...regular circular saws with standard carbide blades will saw 2" aluminum plate easily too- but wear weld sleeves, chips are HOT!

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3817/9378448657_40e0416ed2_z.jpg

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3716/9270441221_8e66f00aa4_z.jpg

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5508/9273227714_3ca5405c91_z.jpg

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7426/9273216404_9c8989f708_z.jpg

Old Hat
12-24-2014, 05:42 PM
I'm impressed!:cool:

tc429
12-24-2014, 08:00 PM
anyone with a older ford 4.6 starter- the top two bolts are a bear to get at...read up on them, options are remove the AC compressor and assemble 24" of 4" wobble extensions to go in from the front- or most techs to suggest just bust the solenoid off, reassemble leaving the top bolt out. really stupid design.

before finding the bust the solenoid tip, I made a tool to reach around the solenoid, yet not hit the manifold- very little roon in there...

took a stubby ratchet, chucked it in the 4 jaw (barely) center drilled it (must run a center- these things are hard as heck) turned the shank down to about 3/8... got a piece of 3/4 stock, drilled a 90 deg hole in one end, 30 deg in the other, worked great, except I made the handle about a foot long, it kept hitting the lower control arm...9" would be perfect

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7554/15806274611_2237594b4a_z.jpg

more pics here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/83232178@N06/sets/

paul463
12-24-2014, 09:16 PM
When cutting a taper with the compound use a speed wrench to turn it makes for a nice even cut .
Richard

I use a cordless drill, works slick as snot.

fixerup
12-25-2014, 11:30 AM
Jim, is a good old timer friend of mine, he is a retired machinist with ton's of old timers tricks. He like to tinker, repair, design, fabricate,talk mechanics etc. He is the old timer that everyone goes too, when they are stuck with no solution to their problems.He doesn't shy away from attempting to fix anything. He inspires me to not give up when face with a problem, just take your time and look for a few possible solution, start with the least damaging or invasive one, so that, if it doesn't work, you will still have a second chance at it.
I often ask Jim if needs free help on is projects, just because I enjoy hanging and helping him out and has a bonus I get to learn something at the same time.

I forget what I was putting back together, but couldn't figure out which of the parts went were. He
told me to use a magnifying glass and look for wear patterns on the piece. Sure enough I was able to recognize some patterns and put the thing back to it original state.

Another time I had broken a tap into a motorcycle engine case, so I call Jim.
Jim said:
1-If there is lots of the broken tap sticking out, flood it with penetrating oil like WD-40, then with a pair of long nose pliers see if you can wiggle it back and forth =>Yes, keep at it until it comes out.
2- not much of the tap sticking out, then take a broken tap and sharpen it to make a sharp point punch with it. Take a hammer and carefully hit the broken tap sideways clockwise and counterclockwise to try to loosen it.
3-if it is a really cheap quality tap try to break it apart with you newly made punch, take a tweezer and keep removing out the broken bits.
4-last resort, you don't want to remove the engine so I will lend you my removable pilot counter bore and drill it out and I'll machine you a plug with thread for it. (he all ways offers is time,tools and material to help out)
Number 2 saved my bacon

This broken tap punch is also useful for removing stubborn screw, with strip out head. First, hammer the outer edge of screw head on straight on top with the punch. Then hammer with the punch that first punch mark going sideways to un-screw. Worked many times for me and save me tons of shop time.

So pick up the phone and call your oldtimers, not because you have a problem but to thank them for being a friend.


Merry Christmas and Happy New Year everyone!

Phil

melsdad
12-25-2014, 11:45 AM
I get hacksaw handles at yard sales, generally no more than 25 cents or half a buck. I have one each with 14 tpi, 18tpi, 24, 32, abrasive grit blade, and abrasive grit rod. Why spend time changing blades?

Also, angle grinders, which are more of a time waster to change. Met a stone carver who must have had a dozen. I have one each of grinding wheel, wire wheel, flapper disk, sanding disk. Next time they're on sale I may get one for a cut off disk.
I have 2 of the horror freight professional (blue) grinders with wire wheel and sanding disc. I have an old makita with a grinding wheel that you can hog with. For the cost it is handy having several grinders ready to go.

tc429
12-25-2014, 01:42 PM
I use a cordless drill, works slick as snot.

I like that idea... i cut off a old extension and ground 3 flats on it to hand fit my drill for nutdriving, never thought about using it in low gear for a feed motor- thanks!

speaking of drilling...ever run into a situation where a mag base drill wont fit? we moved the columns back a few inches on some big vertical lathes, after taking the colums off was pretty easy to transfer the 3/4" bolt pattern and mag base the holes...the 3/4 dowel pins though? rather than risk reamers walking if slightly offset, or going to larger holes, I decided to just drill/ream for new pins after assembly- but the 3" lip on the column wouldnt allow the mag base... I got a 6~8' rod, turned one end to chuck in the mag base chuck, tapped the other end for 1/2-20, put a stud in for another chuck...stuck the mag base on top of the assembled/trammed column, center drilled/drilled/reamed from many feet above... only issue was aligning to the punch mark took 2 people as the runout was pretty flexible- had to keep flexing the shaft till the center ran true, then move the magnet using someone elses eyes for guidance...worked out great :) I usually keep a couple extra chucks/all thread in my toolbox, even a hand drill can get too bulky for access sometimes... a old 1/4" drill chuck on a foot of all-thread has come in handy many times for close quarters work where most drill motors/chucks wont fit.

also, have made blocks to shim the mag base motor out a inch or three, reduced pressure, but the reach is needed sometimes...Milwaukee mag base motors can be flipped upside down too- had to drill out some overhead bolts in a big press once, found it much easier to crib the press at the right height, flip the drill and do upside down, rather than try to hold the mag overhead and stick it on...


Merry Christmas to all you folks-
Tim

HSS
12-25-2014, 03:19 PM
If you have a bolt or a stud with a nut on it and the threads on it are smashed and mangled, slather the threads with anti-seize or never-seize and back the nut off. It will repair the threads as the nut comes off.
Merry Christmas all
Patrick

goodscrap
12-25-2014, 04:52 PM
I need to go the other way.
Any clever Ideas for marking out a total of 12 wires on each end
in two welders and two pedals?

Most assortments are going to cost half of what I paid for a third RFC 23 pedal.
I just want to get all the wiring identical, and may not need any wiring identified again.

So far an assortment of colored shrink tubes seems the simplest.
================

I can delete this post after I find a good lead or idea, and leave the tip/idea up,
to keep the thread on track.

How about printing self adhesive labels (like the old demo ones) and wrapping them around the wire into a tag. Or printing numbers/indents onto paper, cut them out and secure onto the wires with clear heat shrink.

Brian

flylo
12-25-2014, 06:07 PM
Old Hat, I buy colored tape at Horror Fright for cheap, 5 or 6 colors & if you need more use 2 like red & yellow. Add black elect & you'll always have enough choices.

Peter.
12-25-2014, 06:44 PM
A friend of mine has a diesel Mercedes car with a huge watercooled alternator and the 1-way clutch had collapsed in the pulley. He bought a new pulley but chewed up the thread pretty badly getting the old hub off. Tried to buy a replacement but they were ~1000 used so he asked me to have a go at fixing the thread. I could barely hold the edges of the rotor in my chuck and couldn't use a tailstock centre because the hole was mangled so how to re-cut those threads in the end of a thin rotor shaft with barely any purchase on the part? I put a cutting disc in my 5" grinder and dressed it for 60 degree thread cutting. Stuck a bolt in the top handle thread and clamped it in my toolpost with a steadying bar under the handle G-clamped to the cross slide. I lined it up with the thread, set the correct pitch on my screwcutting box and used the grinder to re-dress the thread with the grinder by turning the chuck by hand. In a few minutes the new pulley screwed home easily.

tc429
12-25-2014, 07:53 PM
if you need to press a smaller bearing(say a inch dia or less) and dont have a press with enough throat depth, use your lathe tailstock... I do it all the time rebuilding servo motors, too tall for our little press, and tightening the chuck for a slip/pressing with a live center by just cranking the tailstock in is smooth as silk...

Old Hat
12-25-2014, 08:15 PM
Old Hat, I buy colored tape at Horror Fright for cheap, 5 or 6 colors & if you need more use 2 like red & yellow. Add black elect & you'll always have enough choices.

Got just the thing 5color pack at our Ma & Pa hardware yesterday aft!
Thanks!
==============
GoodSrcrap!
"How about printing self adhesive labels (like the old demo ones) and wrapping them around the wire into a tag. Or printing numbers/indents onto paper, cut them out and secure onto the wires with clear heat shrink.

Brian

I'm saving the clear shrink Idea, so I'll have less chance to need it....
and Piss off Murphy!;)

flylo
12-25-2014, 08:24 PM
Propane tank on he forklift, the brass shaft the handle fits on to open/close the valve broke off flush with still 1/2 a tank of gas so being cheap & thrifty I took a chisel & cut a slot in the brass shaft to fit perfectly a flat screwdriver I had. It works so well I may not change the valve & I've open/closed it well over 50 times and it works like new. Nothing high-tech just got me put of a pinch.

A.K. Boomer
12-25-2014, 09:00 PM
A friend of mine has a diesel Mercedes car with a huge watercooled alternator


Leave it too Mercedes --- so you blow a hose on your alternator and take out a $15,000 dollar engine,,,
don't they know that electrical and water don't mix very well?

bet it does wonders for electrolysis inside the engine block - crazy, just a car - no reason to over complicate things - but that's classic Mercedes for you...

Old Hat
12-25-2014, 09:10 PM
I hung around farms as a kid.
Not into growing stuff but help with fixing all the stuff they brake.
And the stuff the Animals brake. I have seen some of the most
brilliant mechanical feats done by farmers. Not all farmers,
some can scare ya, but the really smart ones.

Not just mechanic related either, I was overcome by an old painting
in one farm-house. The ears of corn in a small field were all bent down
in the same direction at the same angle. I asked about it, but
"it's just a pretty picture, been there forever". Hmnnn ?

Just a few years ago I worked with a young man from El Salvador.
He had been raised farming, and told me of many things I'd not heard before.
So I related the story of the bent down corn.

He explained how and when to bend it, and away from prevailing winds.
Corn storage in the field till ya need it! Cool Hey?

bborr01
12-25-2014, 10:05 PM
All these years I thought that corn ears hung down on their own after the plant dies and the corn starts to dry out. Must be all the farmers go out at night and bend the ears down because I have never seen them doing it. What are you smoking bro?

Brian


I hung around farms as a kid.
Not into growing stuff but help with fixing all the stuff they brake.
And the stuff the Animals brake. I have seen some of the most
brilliant mechanical feats done by farmers. Not all farmers,
some can scare ya, but the really smart ones.

Not just mechanic related either, I was overcome by an old painting
in one farm-house. The ears of corn in a small field were all bent down
in the same direction at the same angle. I asked about it, but
"it's just a pretty picture, been there forever". Hmnnn ?

Just a few years ago I worked with a young man from El Salvador.
He had been raised farming, and told me of many things I'd not heard before.
So I related the story of the bent down corn.

He explained how and when to bend it, and away from prevailing winds.
Corn storage in the field till ya need it! Cool Hey?

cucvzuz
12-25-2014, 10:19 PM
I have found that when removing small flathead allen or machine screws that gave been in the weather or just in there forever. I will try an allen wrench and if it doesnt readily come free give it a little more than light rap with a ballpeen hammer. The impact will loosen the bond in the taper and it will come right out. It saves many stripped allen sockets.

Lots of great stuff in here as always.

Old Hat
12-25-2014, 10:27 PM
All these years I thought that corn ears hung down on their own after the plant dies and the corn starts to dry out. Must be all the farmers go out at night and bend the ears down because I have never seen them doing it. What are you smoking bro?

Brian

Re-read it ass hole.
All bent the same way and done on purpose before it's natural occurrence.
I'm relating what I got as an answer to a question.
I'm not a farmer.

flylo
12-25-2014, 10:37 PM
No reason to call anyone on here an a**-hole, just shows the real you I suppose :mad:

darryl
12-25-2014, 11:14 PM
I like the slingshot idea for running a pull wire. My rendition of that was to make a gun stock basically, just from cheap wood, add a piece of aluminum channel as a barrel, then a strand of surgical tubing on each side. I notched out a piece of solid pvc so it would fit in the slot and catch the two tubings, then added a trigger- the thing is a crossbow basically. I put a supply reel on a post on one side of the stock, with about 50 ft of nylon string on it, and used a good sized spike as an arrow- cross drilled so the string could be attached. Saved me a lot of time running wiring in ceilings. It was a bit like hunting and fishing- shoot at the target, then reel it in.

Speaking of which- in the days when I still installed satellite dishes, we'd run the wiring in a plastic tube to be buried. Getting the wire pulled through was the challenge. Two things I did here- not my idea, but to initially get a pull string through I'd tie a wad of cloth or toilet paper to the string, then vacuum at the other end to pull it through. Takes only seconds to make that happen. To facilitate getting the wire through, a dose of baby powder was added to the wire as it went in. Then I got the idea to vacuum the baby powder into the tube prior to getting the wire started. You know instantly when the powder has gone the length of the tube- the vacuum cleaner suddenly smells like roses :) It's better to be the guy feeding the powder in than the guy that runs the vacuum:)

bborr01
12-25-2014, 11:15 PM
And your post relates to machinist tips and techniques how?

Brian


Re-read it ass hole.
All bent the same way and done on purpose before it's natural occurrence.
I'm relating what I got as an answer to a question.
I'm not a farmer.

boslab
12-26-2014, 01:05 AM
I must admit to have never heard of deliberate corn bending either, plants do it themselves, take a look at the shape of a tree on a windswept plain, I believe the effect is called tropism, plants grow against any force applied like gravity or wind that's how they know which way is up, roots grow towards forces like gravity that's how they know which way is down, and trees bend in the direction of the prevailing wind, not much machining content but handy if you make longbows apparently?, also useful the chainsaw wielders who get to fell trees as the heavy side I'd the downwind side.
Merry Christmas
Mark

flylo
12-26-2014, 01:05 AM
I have found that when removing small flathead allen or machine screws that gave been in the weather or just in there forever. I will try an allen wrench and if it doesnt readily come free give it a little more than light rap with a ballpeen hammer. The impact will loosen the bond in the taper and it will come right out. It saves many stripped allen sockets.

Lots of great stuff in here as always.

I give them a rap to tighten them & normally then they back right out.

flylo
12-26-2014, 01:09 AM
Re-read it ass hole.
All bent the same way and done on purpose before it's natural occurrence.
I'm relating what I got as an answer to a question.
I'm not a farmer.

I think it was a tale told to an old boy they knew would be a know it all & tell hundreds of people. I bet they're still rolling in the floor over that one:rolleyes:
And you thought they were just happy because they invited you on that snipe hunt & I bet even let you hold the bag. Damn now I'm about to roll on the floor just think about it.LOL

boslab
12-26-2014, 01:28 AM
There we go, see the corn bit
http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/tropism/tropisms.html
Mark

flylo
12-26-2014, 01:34 AM
Good article Mark & I think Old Hat ought to do that plant dance shown on the left of the page.

tc429
12-26-2014, 01:34 AM
I like the slingshot idea for running a pull wire. My rendition of that was to make a gun stock basically, just from cheap wood, add a piece of aluminum channel as a barrel, then a strand of surgical tubing on each side. I notched out a piece of solid pvc so it would fit in the slot and catch the two tubings, then added a trigger- the thing is a crossbow basically. I put a supply reel on a post on one side of the stock, with about 50 ft of nylon string on it, and used a good sized spike as an arrow- cross drilled so the string could be attached. Saved me a lot of time running wiring in ceilings. It was a bit like hunting and fishing- shoot at the target, then reel it in.

Speaking of which- in the days when I still installed satellite dishes, we'd run the wiring in a plastic tube to be buried. Getting the wire pulled through was the challenge. Two things I did here- not my idea, but to initially get a pull string through I'd tie a wad of cloth or toilet paper to the string, then vacuum at the other end to pull it through. Takes only seconds to make that happen. To facilitate getting the wire through, a dose of baby powder was added to the wire as it went in. Then I got the idea to vacuum the baby powder into the tube prior to getting the wire started. You know instantly when the powder has gone the length of the tube- the vacuum cleaner suddenly smells like roses :) It's better to be the guy feeding the powder in than the guy that runs the vacuum:)

talcum powder for pulling wire, brilliant! DOH- we've used wire pulling lube forever, everyone calls it 'baby poop', the guy pulling the fishtape ends up slathered with it...definitely going to give that a try... have used both compressed air and vacuum to blow lines thru, never thought of fogging the thing with powder.

speaking of dry lubricants- we just refitted a couple machines, two got ground/turcited, two were in fair enough condition the boss wanted to leave alone- we all agreed they looked good... after firing them up with new controls, one had a stickslip issue, puumping the heck out of the lube didnt help...I had bought some tungsten disulfide powder lube a year or so ago to use as a mold release on a goofy idea we had for casting our own honing stones...anyways, mixed a half teaspoon of that stinky crap with a quart of way lube, mixed it with compressed air bubbling- phew, stinks... dumped a little in the way lube tank, bled/pumped it till we saw the dark oil coming thru, hooked up the lube and pumped a few shots, MAN, what a difference! servo current dropped from 75% to under 20%... did the same thing in all of them with similar results. wouldnt recommend using any dry lube long term for fear of it settling out/plugging things up, but like a little moly on a cam for breaking in a motor, it can work wonders at keeping an initial lube till things polish up... been about 6 months, no issues yet, still running standard way lube... just needed a little help after fitting or sitting too long.
heres a link to the stuff:
http://www.lowerfriction.com/product-page.php?categoryID=1
stinks like nothing ive ever smelled - kinda like a mix of rotten eggs and dog crap- but only up close, not like it gives off fumes...just wouldnt want it on my hands :) but man is it slick... anything with sliding surfaces would probably benefit from it

just noticed 10 pages/95 replies in just a few days, havent seen too many threads this active on most of the forums i visit- kinda neat :)

Old Hat
12-26-2014, 01:55 AM
I think it was a tale told to an old boy they knew would be a know it all & tell hundreds of people. I bet they're still rolling in the floor over that one:rolleyes:
And you thought they were just happy because they invited you on that snipe hunt & I bet even let you hold the bag. Damn now I'm about to roll on the floor just think about it.LOL

Mr. El Salvador may have stung me good on that! I can live with that.
As goes Farmers though, no quarter given. Some of these fellows are
more useful than degreed professors as far as I'm concerned.
And again not just in mechanics, a few are grand welders. BUT
what amazes me is sound real world knowledge. Was it 73 maybe, the first
oil embargo. We got crap from teachers, we could tell meant they had no clue
what was realy happening either. A farmer who was said to be 8th grade educated
went over the whole Oil biZness with us. Explained how resources can be better
leverage than money, and more effective than weapons at trimming an enemie's sails.
Based on the kind of things he taught us, it's a blend of just that, mixed with supply
adjustments that just gave me a tank of gas for $2.17 /gal.
I got concerns about fracking, and no love for Putin, or the European union propping up
a puppet in the Ukrain. But ya know Oil has to be tied in with this.

So, as on topic as it needs to be. I'm not intent on pissing on this thread.
Cheers

Deus Machina
12-26-2014, 02:48 AM
I applied some dykem on the top of my vice jaws and used a spring-loaded center to scribe a line exactly in the center of travel. Works more than well enough for reference on anything I do that doesn't need extremely tight precision.

Aside from that, I learned most of my tricks from our own Mr. Ford. http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/hstpages.html

DATo
12-26-2014, 03:35 AM
Another very simple idea that you don't need .... till you need it.

One of the big advantages of using Kurt type vises is that you can remove the jaws and bolt them onto the back of either the movable block or the solid end thus increasing the vice's capacity. But because the jaws are counterbored the pain in the ass comes in when, after busting loose the large Allen bolts with an Allen wrench, you have to keep pulling the allen wrench out and indexing it because the distance between the location of the bolt and the floor of the vise will not allow you to turn the Allen wrench 360 degrees.

A simple fix for this is to have a short (2" - 3" Long) piece of hex stock which is the same size as the Allen cavity of the bolt tucked away in your toolbox. Once you break the screw loose you simply insert the hex stock into the Allen head cavity of the bolt and use the hex stock sort of like a nut driver to spin the bolt out using just your fingers.

EDIT:
We also have an enormous 6 jaw chuck with bolt on jaws. In this case when the jaws need to be unbolted and turned around I use another piece of hex stock with a turned down end to fit the chuck of our 1/2 inch, Makita, variable speed hand drill. These are 12, big assed, 3/4" Allen bolts (2 per jaw) and once I bust them loose with a comparably huge Allen wrench (with a pipe persuader) I insert the hex stock into the screw head and buzz the screws out with the power drill. When replacing them I set the drill's torque to disengage at about 1/2 of the drill's torque capacity thus saving me a broken wrist when the screws bottom out. Speeds the process up nicely.

boslab
12-26-2014, 06:54 AM
I must admit that when I had a makita screw/drill I never needed to worry about the torques settings much, since it got stolen I replaced it with a Milwaukee 4Ah drill, you do need to use the torque setting or it can break drills and wrists, well done Milwaukee, built like a tank.
Like the talc powder tip, common sense really a lot of multi core cable I've stripped has talc inside to stop the connectors sticking when the sleeve gets put on.
We had a big old mig set in work that had a talc or soap as you liked box the wire went through before leaving the machine down a 50' torch lead, never seen that feature on new machines but it did work well
Mark

tc429
12-26-2014, 07:46 AM
I must admit that when I had a makita screw/drill I never needed to worry about the torques settings much, since it got stolen I replaced it with a Milwaukee 4Ah drill, you do need to use the torque setting or it can break drills and wrists, well done Milwaukee, built like a tank.


we had a bunch of those Milwaukee 'holeshooter' drills at work- only drill I ever really WANTED the goofy side handle on... the full length 'trigger' was a very bad idea, one handed you wouldnt stand a chance whenever they grabbed- with the side handle, at least you had a fighting chance of releasing the trigger. never ever saw one of those burn/wear out- every one wound up with a busted case or bent shaft from the inevitable dropping...loved the power/weight, but man, what a stupid trigger design. I have since fell in love with Bosch power tools, but all those are older too, new stuff is probably out of the same chinese factory as every other brand...
best cordless drill ive ever had was a Porter-Peerless, was USA made, still works but batteries barely charge anymore.

worst power tool I ever bought was a 1/2 Black and Decker hammerdrill bought back in 06... remember well, just bought for studding a auto lift in the garage floor- first hole it burnt up, really sucked as it stopped me for the day...tossed it back in the box, went to return/exchange it Monday- nope- contact B-D for warranty...box/insure, ship your expense to somewhere way out west, for evaluation? forgot about it... this summer, got in a bind for a 1/2 hand drill at home on a Sunday, dont recall for what, but as always, either find a way or wait till next weekend... figured I'd take the B-D apart, hack the speed control out of it, use the plug to turn it off- just once, i was desperate...assumed the day it wuit the speed control had quit...
upon taking it apart, was dumbfounded... cheapest 'reverse' setup ever- the brush holder rides on molded pins, lever rotates it 45 degrees to reverse the motor via timing- just first time under load with flat/unworn brushes, one brush holder got hot and melted the soft plastic plate it rode on, losing brush contact...used a soldering iron to remelt the plastic, it still works- what a junk motor though- last B-D tool I will ever purchase- if you have one, be sure to run it lightly loaded for a while to seat the brushes in, and watch you dont put your hand over the air vents- they are right where they should not be...crap design/crap warranty in my opinion.

have to put in a plug for old Skil hand drills...back in 93 we got a old transfer line and a big dial transfer machine for machining ABS valves, deburring/cleaning required a long 5/32 drill be ran into a deep angled hole...I used my old Skil hand drill the first few days we ran it, forgot about it for a couple weeks- guy running the line had the shop get me a new drill as mine was already beat up- would you believe that thing ran the length of that contract? probably >200,000 parts, X2 holes... handle had worn smooth as a mirror, couple cracks in the case, chuck bearings were loose to the point they might not have been in there...motor/trigger/cord were all still in great condition save the red trigger button was loose as heck... I tore it apart when I saw it as we dismantled the line for scrapping, that motor still had half length brushes, aluminum dust all thru it, yet ran smooth/cool and never tripped the GFI... gears were ever so close to gone though it didnt have much more left- but jeez... Skil made darn great motors.

flylo
12-26-2014, 09:26 AM
My friend down the road was baling hay in the rolls & about 20 were on fire, finally stopped went to the barn & the rear roller was siezed & very hot so he called me & another friend to help. The hex head bolt was frozen & the hex wrench slipping so I welded it to the bolt & it backed the bolt right out. Bill is a thrifty ole boy & when I left he was grinding off the weld to save the wrench & bolt which I would do too. Funny part was he kept bailing after seeing the 1st few on fire.

Black Forest
12-26-2014, 11:12 AM
I must admit that when I had a makita screw/drill I never needed to worry about the torques settings much, since it got stolen I replaced it with a Milwaukee 4Ah drill, you do need to use the torque setting or it can break drills and wrists, well done Milwaukee, built like a tank.
Like the talc powder tip, common sense really a lot of multi core cable I've stripped has talc inside to stop the connectors sticking when the sleeve gets put on.
We had a big old mig set in work that had a talc or soap as you liked box the wire went through before leaving the machine down a 50' torch lead, never seen that feature on new machines but it did work well
Mark

I have that feature on my sewing machine. It lubricates the thread as it leaves the spool. Silicone lube I think.

A.K. Boomer
12-26-2014, 11:32 AM
No reason to call anyone on here an a**-hole, just shows the real you I suppose :mad:



I was just waiting for someone to say it was ok because it was actually a term of endearment in Scotland - or Cambodia - or something like that...

chucketn
12-26-2014, 11:40 AM
A.K., I thought it was a term of endearment. My ex-wife used it to describe me all the time...Especially to my children.

Chuck

A.K. Boomer
12-26-2014, 01:14 PM
That sucks Chuck - congrats on making her an ex though...

I think I may be able to add to this topic now (without getting anybody hurt)


three little things and might jog my memory for more u never know...

first off, rags are fine for wiping down equipment but something like mill tables and vise bottoms should be final wiped with a very clean hand,,, rags do not have "feeling" and your very clean hand is capable of not only feeling and picking up the finest of particulate but reassuring you the coast is clear for a bolt up without impregnating your table with crumbs...

A handy thing to do when setting up Z depth is to use a sticky note or even a hand held scrap of paper between the rotating cutter and the work piece,,, it's just a little extra insurance and a buffer zone so you don't have to crank the handle at total snails pace, when the paper rips you know you got about .003" to go,,,
You can also use this method in static mode and it will keep you from breaking the fragile edges of the carbide cutter...
It's simply a quick way to do production type stuff without having to walk on eggshells so to speak...

Last but not least --- when getting into fairly precision work -- as in making keys that are + or - .0005" or less,
parallels and vise base deviations start to show... yet the tolerance is actually to small a margin for any appropriate shim...
yet you have a choice of all kinds of "liquid shims" at your disposal,,, say you need to lift one side of the parallel just 2/10ths --- remove the parallels and super clean but keep track of the way it was installed and place a little 3in1 oil under the low sides edge, apply sliding pressure when you install and work back and forth a little then try a few rounds and see what you got,,,
need a little more lift for more deviation? use some vactra and do the same,,, need yet a little more, use some grease...

Again take all this with a grain of salt because im not a machinist at all and actually find it painstakingly boring...

Old Hat
12-26-2014, 02:08 PM
No reason to call anyone on here an a**-hole, just shows the real you I suppose :mad:

A Sunday school teacher might tell you there is no reason to call anyone anywhere an a**-hol ever.
Oops.
I am not a Sunday school teacher. I'm a professional worker of metals.
And it's the least I could do, when a particular member's default setting
is to fire off a round of ridicule, when ever there's a chance to, involving
a matter he has no intention of lending anything constructive to.

And in his case I could perhaps leave it alone, if he'd show any signs
of creativity or originality. I've all ready said I'm happy to drop it,
but if others wanna play, I've got today off.
Have a Nice Day :o

flylo
12-26-2014, 02:55 PM
Matbe you should be a subday school teacher, probably better at that than metal worker, never know till you try:confused:

J. Randall
12-27-2014, 08:54 PM
And your post relates to machinist tips and techniques how?

Brian
How is your post insinuating that someone is a doper, and getting offended when you get a like reply on topic? Back to your old tricks of personal attacks and another couple of persons piling on I see. If you can't take it, don't dish it out to start with.
James

tc429
12-28-2014, 12:49 AM
plunge milling tight diameter holes: had to plunge some flat holes pretty deep one day, machine too loose/cutter too flexible, found a way around it-

hand grind the cutting edge off one flute off a 2 flute endmill, hole will come out a thou or so under the mill diameter and finish is beautiful... for me(not a machinist by any means) usually plunging a small flat bottom hole requires interpolating with a undersized mill, but if deep, interpolation often tapers from deflection... I found knocking one flute off, the tool is too stable to cut oversize and wont taper at all when plunging... tool so stable, it can even run in a mag base drill- try that with a normal endmill = breakage

tc429
12-28-2014, 12:58 AM
rough tap drill diameter without a chart-

m10 x 1.5 tap drill? about 8.5mm, just subtract the pitch...I'd never thought about it till talking to a Russian friend of mine one day on a big odd sized threaded hole...DOH! Ive mentioned this to quite a few guys over the years, noone ever heard of it either- but then too, we arent machinists or engineers- probably old hat to a lot of folks, but not folks I know :)

2"-12? 2- (1/12)= about 1.916
3/8-16? .375-(1/16)= about .3125

works if you dont have a chart around...made total sense when he told me, just I'd never thought about it...

tc429
12-28-2014, 01:17 AM
speaking of my old Russian buddy- he told me a story about his final project at the engineering school he was at in Russia... had to design a fixture for a odd shaped part, submit prints to instructor for approval, them make the fixture, run the part... he drew it all up, doublechecked all his numbers turned it in- instructor said fix it or I'll fail you? he looked kinda dumbfounded and the instructor said' imagine running the part- and fix it'...put the part in, take 8mm wrench, snug a support,take a 10mm wrench ant tighten a bolt- oops. he changed the smaller bolt to 10mm wrench and got an A.

making things that work vs things that work EASILY was something they always strived for.

my son is working part time in the machine shop, just learning how to fixture/run stuff, just last week had him sketching up some servo adapters... needed a bunch of 7" square plates, 5.something x 1/8 max male register on one side, 4.25 x 1/8 min female register on the other, about a 4" clearance bore...was talking about how to set it up to do the male/flip, female- DOH- Konstantin woulda kicked my butt for that.

turn the male, bore thru 4.25 from same side... extra clearance wont hurt, saves a setup/chance for added runout- my son liked going thru the thought process- especially as it saved him lathe time...hope he remembers too :)

hes learning, already figured sawing double length, stacking in the saw and cutting in half lets you cut a bunch while doing other things, etc... he hates machining, but its kinda a necessary precursor to getting into machine tool building/assembly as we are always making/modifying as needed...

tc429
12-28-2014, 11:23 AM
moglice fixturing option-

those that have relined machines with Moglice, theres a million ways to fixture...most glue moglice shim in and inject, but think I have a easier way- I drilled/tapped all wear surface areas, actually assembled/aligned the sides with brass jackscrews... once all square/trammed, lift the slide, tape it up spray the releasein even coats, CAREFULLY assemble so brass dont scratch the release off, and inject it. on gibs, i glued shim on BOTH sides and injected both... 100% contact on both sides with no scraping required...just deflash, flake and assemble.
that machine ran 6 years with zero adjustments and to this day gave the best ballbar plot of any machine(even new) we ever bought- i was really proud of it- till a bad wreck removed the slide :(
still cant convince the boss to go moglice...we redo turcite all the time, makes a spongy machine in my opinion. yes I had about 40 hours in that moglice test, but noone can argue it didnt both work better and last longer than the turcite. assembling on brass jacks to align makes tweaking near perfect almost easy compared to machining/scraping of shims... i still think its the easiest way to go- but again, i'm no machinist, just a tinkerer...

CalM
12-28-2014, 11:50 AM
moglice fixturing option-

those that have relined machines with Moglice, theres a million ways to fixture...most glue moglice shim in and inject, but think I have a easier way- I drilled/tapped all wear surface areas, actually assembled/aligned the sides with brass jackscrews... once all square/trammed, lift the slide, tape it up spray the releasein even coats, CAREFULLY assemble so brass dont scratch the release off, and inject it. on gibs, i glued shim on BOTH sides and injected both... 100% contact on both sides with no scraping required...just deflash, flake and assemble.
that machine ran 6 years with zero adjustments and to this day gave the best ballbar plot of any machine(even new) we ever bought- i was really proud of it- till a bad wreck removed the slide :(
still cant convince the boss to go moglice...we redo turcite all the time, makes a spongy machine in my opinion. yes I had about 40 hours in that moglice test, but noone can argue it didnt both work better and last longer than the turcite. assembling on brass jacks to align makes tweaking near perfect almost easy compared to machining/scraping of shims... i still think its the easiest way to go- but again, i'm no machinist, just a tinkerer...

Not to start off on machine rebuilding, but with the jack screw Moglice method, you still need to scrape one surface true before building on the second.
Other wise, you have only rebuilt half of the wear.

tc429
12-28-2014, 04:35 PM
Not to start off on machine rebuilding, but with the jack screw Moglice method, you still need to scrape one surface true before building on the second.
Other wise, you have only rebuilt half of the wear.
all ours are removeable/box ways- we have a fixture to grind them on...I put the screws right in the middle of the moglice pad areas, injected right around them, took a die grinder to relieve the brass a bit when cutting the oil grooves.

one other thing different on that one, they originally had shimmed gib adjustment- I put a collar on a long setscrew that went under the gib mounting plate(where shims originally went around the bolt) and turned a piece of hex stock round except the last half inch...bored round holes in the way wiper to allow the round part of the long 'nut' to slide thru...to adjust, hold the setscrew, crack the 'nut' loose, crank the setscrew in, snug the nut to push the gib in as needed, back the setscrew out till it hit the bottom side, lock the nut... used that on a lot of machines since, worked great to allow adjusting without removing the way wipers :)

Ive never injected over a hand scraped surface, dont think it would work too well without a lot of hand work after separation... replication using the FL/P injection over a finely reground surface is awesome though :) I really think the reason they wont go moglice at work is the bad taste in their mouth from some local rebuilders that buttered up/handscraped a bunch of slides in moglice for us a few months after that first one I did (the rebuilders insisted injection was not as good as hand fitting) think it was 4, mighta been 6 machines they 'fitted' every one chunked out within a year, really pissed off the boss as it was a LOT of money and downtime to 'fix' them by going back to turcite in-house...

I'll always feel grind/inject would always be better than hand fitting, as long as the grind is perfect, you cant miss... yes separation can be downright scary(another plus with the jackscrews- they really assist at busting the thing apart) but other than the inevetable leaks/mess, it makes for one sweet slide...in my opinion :)

janvanruth
12-28-2014, 06:36 PM
in getting a piece of string into a pipe to pull a wire by, i found out it works best if the string is a the tape from a music cassette.
no need for a a rag on the end nor for talcumpowder.

ArkTinkerer
12-28-2014, 11:31 PM
More electrical than machinist but you folks do a bit of wiring now and again...

Rather than purchase a roll of every color for every size wire under the sun, buy rolls of white wire. Keep a set of colored sharpies to stripe the wire as you pull it from the reel. On those rare occasions when you need more wires than you have colors, you can even do a second color stripe. Really keeps the inventory down if you can't justify having all the colors on hand.

Old Hat
12-28-2014, 11:39 PM
More electrical than machinist but you folks do a bit of wiring now and again...

Rather than purchase a roll of every color for every size wire under the sun, buy rolls of white wire. Keep a set of colored sharpies to stripe the wire as you pull it from the reel. On those rare occasions when you need more wires than you have colors, you can even do a second color stripe. Really keeps the inventory down if you can't justify having all the colors on hand.

. . . +1 . . .

Ironwoodsmith
12-29-2014, 01:54 AM
But what happens when the sharpy fades away? I would feel better with colored tape at each end.

ArkTinkerer
12-29-2014, 11:41 AM
But what happens when the sharpy fades away? I would feel better with colored tape at each end.

I have not noted a problem for wiring in cabinets. While I have seen it fade on other things that I use outdoors I don't know if that is due to sun fading or weathering. But, for wires in a cabinet that don't move I really don't see a problem. I'll get back to you in another 10-20 years and let you know though!

duckman
12-29-2014, 11:52 AM
A sneaky little little trick that I showed an employee when he was trying to attach a tension spring in side a machine, take the spring flex it side ways and put washers in the openings, now flex it the other way and put more washers in, keep doing until you can install the spring. then just start removing the washers, I use washers so that I can run a string thru the holes and not drop any inside the machine when removing them.

Mcostello
12-29-2014, 08:43 PM
Major Cool Trick!

cucvzuz
12-29-2014, 10:49 PM
I thought of another one....

Another machinist friend of MI e shared this a few years ago...
When using a hole saw in the mill or with a mag drill, and in material thicker then the gullets are deep. To keep the chips from pack in first center up the bit and touch the bit down then drill a hole with the pilot bit right on the cut line. This hole allows the chips to fall out of the teeth every revolution. I like to drill two so the. Hips don't have to travel as far. There will be a partial hole in the first wished part so if it .matters you can set the hole a little closer to center so it doesn't effect the finished hole. You will be amazed how much better they drill with a little chip relief.

fixerup
12-30-2014, 12:26 AM
My hydraulic press tip.
Whenever I'm trying to press apart a bearing,pin, whatever. I like to apply some pressure on the part and then take a small brass hammer and gently tap the piece, at different location. This usually gets the pressing action going, without the need of excessive hydraulic pressure.
This trick is a good idea for times when the housing is thin,fragile or could permanently bend out of shape.

locate the part on the hydraulic press,put pressure on the pieces, tap tap tap, doesn't come apart repeat.

Cheers!
Phil

tc429
12-30-2014, 01:10 AM
I thought of another one....

Another machinist friend of MI e shared this a few years ago...
When using a hole saw in the mill or with a mag drill, and in material thicker then the gullets are deep. To keep the chips from pack in first center up the bit and touch the bit down then drill a hole with the pilot bit right on the cut line. This hole allows the chips to fall out of the teeth every revolution. I like to drill two so the. Hips don't have to travel as far. There will be a partial hole in the first wished part so if it .matters you can set the hole a little closer to center so it doesn't effect the finished hole. You will be amazed how much better they drill with a little chip relief.

excellent!

Willy
12-30-2014, 01:27 AM
My hydraulic press tip.
Whenever I'm trying to press apart a bearing,pin, whatever. I like to apply some pressure on the part and then take a small brass hammer and gently tap the piece, at different location. This usually gets the pressing action going, without the need of excessive hydraulic pressure.
This trick is a good idea for times when the housing is thin,fragile or could permanently bend out of shape.

locate the part on the hydraulic press,put pressure on the pieces, tap tap tap, doesn't come apart repeat.

Cheers!
Phil



Good advice Phil, and this technique also applies to other applications that require negative or positive pressure such as gear/bearing pullers, pulling splined hubs, automotive/industrial gear and suspension components, etc.

Amazing how many times I see guys using so much pressure on a tool that it is almost to the point of being wrecked when a couple of taps with a hammer much earlier during the process would have sufficed. Work smart.

darryl
12-30-2014, 01:32 AM
On the color coding of wiring- I'm currently working on my power supply project again, and couldn't find the wire I was going to use. I ended up using some npn or something like that- a rubber coated wire that's often found on coffee pots, irons, etc. Stripped it into single wires and attached to banana jacks, etc. To identify them as to polarity and ac or dc, I'm going to use colored heat shrink- black and red for the dc ones, and probably white for the ac wires. You can also get clear heat shrink, so that makes it possible to write an identity on paper and encapsulate that under a short length of clear. I've done this in the past, works really well.

I know I'm straying a bit here, but for my banana connectors I'm using the guts from some coaxial connectors I bought cheap. Don't recall the type- not bnc though- these have a fatter inner connector, and were probably used in ham radio. Anyway, I cut the inner connector in half- one half becomes the female part and the other is the male part. They are gold plated brass. I'll see if I can find out what type they were.

Hmm- I think they were SO-239 female to bnc adapters- originally a radio shack part. Got dozens of them cheap. I've used lots of the SO-239 chassis mount female connectors as banana jacks.

mygrizzly1022
12-30-2014, 09:43 AM
Hi all

With all the good tips being offered here I am surprised no one has offered up “The steel rule and a sharp center point, to find center for drilling on round stock”.

A sharp center held in drill press or mill and brought down on a steel rule balanced across round stock will sit level when the point centers on round stock.

Not super precise, but more often than not, close enough for hobby work.



Bert

bborr01
12-30-2014, 10:52 AM
The same trick works well for centering a tool bit on a lathe too.

Brian


Hi all

With all the good tips being offered here I am surprised no one has offered up “The steel rule and a sharp center point, to find center for drilling on round stock”.

A sharp center held in drill press or mill and brought down on a steel rule balanced across round stock will sit level when the point centers on round stock.

Not super precise, but more often than not, close enough for hobby work.



Bert

Prokop
12-30-2014, 10:59 AM
A sneaky little little trick that I showed an employee when he was trying to attach a tension spring in side a machine, take the spring flex it side ways and put washers in the openings, now flex it the other way and put more washers in, keep doing until you can install the spring. then just start removing the washers, I use washers so that I can run a string thru the holes and not drop any inside the machine when removing them.

Pennies work well too. Used on motorcycle center stand spring.

Another trick: using a grease gun to get frozen piston out of brake caliper.

ikdor
12-30-2014, 03:10 PM
This is more an electrical trick but machines have wires too.
When you try to solder two wires together in mid air, you quickly find out you need four hands to hold the wires, iron and solder. The trick is to strip a long length from one wire, about 30mm, and then trim all but a few strands to normal length (e.g. 10mm).
You then place the two 10mm stripped sections next to each other and wind the few long strands around them to keep them together. This should hold everything together in mid air while you apply the iron and solder them at your leisure.
Don't forget to slide the heatshrink tube on before soldering as it's much harder afterwards :-)

And a tip for those designing machinery; when selecting bearings from a bearing catalog, do not assume all of them are available or sensibly priced. Please check with a distributor or other source first to prevent frustration later.

Igor

Old Hat
12-31-2014, 02:10 PM
Fire-hose......handy for protection....... of ... you name it.

Tig Torch cover for harsh environment.
http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p92/swadge/Turret%20Bridge/0901121104_zpsf552924b.jpg (http://s126.photobucket.com/user/swadge/media/Turret%20Bridge/0901121104_zpsf552924b.jpg.html)
=============
Slide over your long or large endmills to protect flutes but reveal markings on shanks.
============
I use it under pinky & ring-finger on pre-heated tig welding to protect the heal of the hand.
A U-tuber offering his "Tig-Finger" gave me that Idea.
===================
I use it over lifting straps to protect the straps from missed sharps edges
or ruff forgings, (chains not allowed at work).
It can be slit open along one side for a larger protective pad.
Or for straps all-ready in position and can't be threaded around.

Mine was from a demolition of a housing project.
Turns up on Ebay all the time. Usually decommissioned fire-hose.
example'
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-1-2-FIRE-HOSE-VERY-GOOD-CONDITION-KEPT-IN-CABINET-/161538803271?pt=BI_Security_Fire_Protection&hash=item259c768647

HWooldridge
12-31-2014, 03:56 PM
This is more an electrical trick but machines have wires too.
When you try to solder two wires together in mid air, you quickly find out you need four hands to hold the wires, iron and solder. The trick is to strip a long length from one wire, about 30mm, and then trim all but a few strands to normal length (e.g. 10mm).
You then place the two 10mm stripped sections next to each other and wind the few long strands around them to keep them together. This should hold everything together in mid air while you apply the iron and solder them at your leisure.
Don't forget to slide the heatshrink tube on before soldering as it's much harder afterwards :-)

And a tip for those designing machinery; when selecting bearings from a bearing catalog, do not assume all of them are available or sensibly priced. Please check with a distributor or other source first to prevent frustration later.

Igor

That's a good one - I'll have to remember that kink.

Old Hat
12-31-2014, 04:50 PM
Consider removing the handles and most of the tangs**, from a selection of high quality files
and keeping them for pull/ flush/ and draw filing.

Learn to use files in other ways than conventional push/ filing.
Doing so is very advantageous in many situations.

Also mark the odd slightly arched new file you'll buy now and then.
You'll find situations where the arch makes a world of difference.

**Round the end where the tang was.
Heated, the tangs can be bent to a handy hook as well as no longer being dangerous.

tc429
01-01-2015, 06:22 PM
model airplane guys know of this, but not a lot of others-

you can glue/repair anything with baking soda and THIN grade CyanoAcrylate glue available in hobbyshops. if its broken clean, hold together tight, put a drop of thin CA over the break, capilliary action draws it in and it sets up extremely fast if the glue is fresh- instantly if it gets on your skin! shape a layer/fillet of baking soda over the joint, smooth it out beforehand as it will be rock hard after- quickly wet it with a stream of thin CA = a puff of steam and its ready to use instantly- dont go more than 1/16 inch at a time thick or it might melt the plastic, gets hot as hell. the only thing ive ever found strong enough to glue stuff like laptop hinge cracks...will glue anything- steel/rubber/wood/plastic/glass- but any CA tends to 'fog' any clear polycarbonate or styrene clear plastics. special grade 'flex' ca for polycarbonates works slower, but strong, with minimal fogging.

every machinist/maintenance/tool collector guy or gal needs to visit a hobbyshop sometimes- lots of great materials/tools/small hardware out there that lots of folks have never seen.

wtrueman
01-06-2015, 01:04 AM
Artful: how are you and family doing after the latest strike? Over here, our strikes are still Very minor compared to you guys. Be safe, Wayne.

The Artful Bodger
01-06-2015, 01:49 AM
wtrueman, you talking to me? I didnt know we had any strikes on.

Cheers

John

darryl
01-06-2015, 02:41 AM
Talking about fire hose- I found some one day and brought it home. Then one day I needed a way to store various pieces of plexiglass, etc- stuff that I didn't want scratched. End result was a cart on castors, bottom about 20 inches wide and 4 ft long. 4 2x4s under it lengthwise, equally spaced. I drilled many holes through the ply and into the 2x4s, then placed sections of electro-mechanical tubing into the holes. Each piece of tubing had a piece of fire hose over it. You can nest a lot of flat goods into it- plexiglass, laminates, whatever. Roll it out of the way. Ours gets put up against a garage door, so it's out of the way until the door needs to open- which isn't often for that door.

Old Hat
01-06-2015, 10:15 AM
When in creative mode, deliberately form a counter-line of thought, a possible reversal of your original Idea.

After all, a mono-plane can be built with the propeller on the nose or the tail.

If you are going to render a fantastic thing from a block of metal, you may end up in dire str8s,
If you carve away a region first, that would have been better carved off last.