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gstprecision
02-04-2015, 07:31 PM
I know lateral (headstock to tailstock) is normally not a concern but here is my situation.

I just moved to a new house. Had the garage floor poured to 10" on one side for my 1340 lathe. What I did not know is the rules have changed and the floors are now sloped toward the garage door because garage drains are illegals apparently.

Now the lathe is out of level laterally by approx 1 inch on the bed length. Thinking of buying adjustable feet to level the stand.

What are you thinking?

Thanks
GST

darryl
02-04-2015, 08:12 PM
One inch in forty would bother me- I'd use adjustable feet.

Toolguy
02-04-2015, 08:41 PM
Most times you have to do that anyway due to the floor not being made flat or level to begin with or cracking and settling over time.

firbikrhd1
02-04-2015, 08:48 PM
I find your situation somewhat surprising. I just built a new house and although the garage floor had to be sloped where the vehicles sit, other areas are level. As for drains not being legal, that may be a local code. In my case I could have had floor drains but they tend to be a pain because they get filled with dirt and the traps dry out unless you are washing the floor often enough to keep them filled. Dry traps = some stink gases in your garage and house if attached. I opted for the sloped floors.
I'm with darryl, I'd use some kind of feet to level the machine. The only question is will the slope be annoying while you are standing in front of the machine working? An inch over the length of the bed doesn't sound like much but it is probably perceptible when you are working in that area.
Can you arrange the lathe so it sits across the slope instead of parallel to it? Since the width of the lathe is much less than the length the amount necessary to get it level across the ways. That would also provide a walking work area that is parallel to the bed ways so bed height would not vary as you went from headstock to tailstock.

CalM
02-04-2015, 09:05 PM
The lathe could care less, as long as there is no twist in the bed!

But it would be "unsettling" for you or me as we went about our efforts to use the lathe. There is absolutely NO reason not to put rough and fine shims under the low end to both level the lathe bed AND align the bed for twist.

A bit of "slant" is often a useful part of any machine that uses coolant. Flow in the correct direction is always desirable.

Toolguy
02-04-2015, 10:17 PM
The good machines have the slant in the coolant trough so the bed can be level.

LKeithR
02-04-2015, 10:30 PM
The lathe could care less, as long as there is no twist in the bed!...

Absolutely!!! There seems to be a great misconception on the part of many people on the web that a lathe must be level to work properly. Level is a good place to start but the proper way to set one up is to level as close as possible and then perform a two-collar test and progressively remove any twist from the bed by adjusting the mounting pads. And, unless you have an extremely rigid floor or concrete base to set the machine on, you need to check and adjust the machine periodically because it will move and settle over time...

Richard King
02-04-2015, 10:37 PM
I know lateral (headstock to tailstock) is normally not a concern but here is my situation.

I just moved to a new house. Had the garage floor poured to 10" on one side for my 1340 lathe. What I did not know is the rules have changed and the floors are now sloped toward the garage door because garage drains are illegals apparently.

Now the lathe is out of level laterally by approx 1 inch on the bed length. Thinking of buying adjustable feet to level the stand.

What are you thinking?

Thanks
GST

Adjustable stands would work as long as you specify the weight of the lathe when you order them. You could also use 1/2" leveling plates on one end and 1 1/2" on the other end. Be sure to spot face a 1/8" deep hole for the leveling screw set in them, so the lathe does not walk when you tighten the leveling screw. You could also epoxy some steel plates to the floor. I would also check to see if the chip pan is parallel to the ways. If Tool guy is not correct and you use coolant the coolant might puddle under the head end. Many never level the bed to the earth if the do not use coolant as it is not so important. Hard to level a lathe when it's on a Air-craft carrier. As Tool guy said, making the bed ways parallel is more important so it does not cut a taper. Rich

gstprecision
02-05-2015, 06:25 AM
Firbkrhd1 I do not know if it is provincial or Federal law but I know of a couple provinces where house are built that way now. As you probably noticed I am in Canada, and we put salt and other chemical on our roads to melt the ice. They do not want those products to make their way into the potable water treatment plants.

I am gonna get some swivel feet for the stand level it then address the bed levelling.

Thx

GST

rwnash
02-05-2015, 10:21 AM
GST,

I put leveling feet under my lathe - ones with a swivel pad. I did order ones with "fine" thread and it helped with the adjustment. So far so good - probably ought to check it again however.

Good luck,

Whit Nash