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View Full Version : OT: computer monitor aspect ratio....



DR
02-08-2015, 10:41 AM
A couple of my programs can't display the whole page when I set the screen display to large. This is W7 using the control panel.

If I use the default small display it's fine showing the whole page except the print is so small I have to have my nose on the screen. My Dell monitor is nominally just under 15" wide by 12" high.

Going shopping for a larger monitor I see the common aspect ratios are about 16:9 as opposided to the ideal 4:3 which the older ones were (this is per the store clerk).

What's the solution? He suggested possibly getting a TV that has VGA output. I note our bedroom TV is much bigger than my current monitor and has VGA. Maybe I'll try that one. But, my computer desk/bookcase won't fit with that TV.

peekaboobus
02-08-2015, 10:43 AM
I don't even think most places sell 4:3. You can get a widescreen, and then flip it sideways so you display the full page on the screen.

DR
02-08-2015, 10:59 AM
I don't even think most places sell 4:3. You can get a widescreen, and then flip it sideways so you display the full page on the screen.

Yeah, that was one of the clerk's suggestions. My concern then was I might have a width problem.

I'm typing this post on an iPad with the wide screen and low height. Rotating to vertical gives a tall page,but narrow and smaller type.

JoeLee
02-08-2015, 11:34 AM
Yeah, that was one of the clerk's suggestions. My concern then was I might have a width problem.

I'm typing this post on an iPad with the wide screen and low height. Rotating to vertical gives a tall page,but narrow and smaller type. I have the same problem. I think web pages have evolved faster than computer screens have.

JL.................

Bruce Griffing
02-08-2015, 11:48 AM
I have a 2560x1080 pixel screen that is 27" wide and just under 12" tall. You can watch an HD movie at full resolution and have screen left over. Two documents can easily be viewed side by side. It is made by LG - an ultrawide.

DR
02-08-2015, 12:01 PM
I have the same problem. I think web pages have evolved faster than computer screens have.

JL.................

Really irritating is one of the "print settings" pages for my new HP printer is one that I encountered recently. In that case there's no reason why the page has to be so tall, it's mostly white space.

dp
02-08-2015, 12:39 PM
Here is the information that web page designers refer to when creating web pages.

http://gs.statcounter.com/

macona
02-08-2015, 12:52 PM
4:3 Ideal? I find 16:9 or 16:10 way more useful, I can have too full text screen next to each other. Also 16:9 is closer to your eyes aspect ratio and closer to what camera take, which again is more useful when editing. 4:3 is a remnant from old movie and TV days. Outside of industrial suppliers like Planar 4:3 LCDs are almost impossible to get.

If text is too small increase the default size in your control panel. All TVs now have HDMI input and connect right to a computer with either DVI, Displayport, or HDMI out. There are adapter cables to go between. Do not use VGA, it is old analog crap and it will not be nearly as clean as the others when viewing text at these higher resolutions.

lakeside53
02-08-2015, 12:54 PM
Get 2 or three monitors... I run 2 side by side mainly for more desk space. I generally leave my clutter on one, and the apps on other, but it's seamless to slide from one to the other.


If you want more resolution on one, get a 4K monitor.

LKeithR
02-08-2015, 01:14 PM
Just a thought...is your monitor set to its native resolution? Right click on the Desktop and then click on "Properties" in the little dialogue box that pops up. When you're in Properties click on the "Settings" tab at the top of the box. In Settings you should see a slider that you can move to select the correct resolution--the proper resolution for your monitor "should" be one of the choices. If you don't know the resolution of your monitor you can measure it and calculate the aspect ratio. My current monitor is 1920 x 1080 which gives me a ratio of 1.777 or .563 depending on which way you calculate it.

Another trick is to change the DPI setting. Click on Desktop...Settings and then "Advanced" at the lower right of the dialogue box. In the box that pops up click on the "General" tab. In that box there is a place to adjust the DPI setting. You can experiment with "Custom" settings to see if you can find something that works for you.

You can, of course, change the screen size any time by clicking on Control +/-.

All of the adjustments I've described work in XP but I'm assuming there are similar settings available in Win7...

Black Forest
02-08-2015, 02:06 PM
4:3 Ideal? I find 16:9 or 16:10 way more useful, I can have too full text screen next to each other. Also 16:9 is closer to your eyes aspect ratio and closer to what camera take, which again is more useful when editing. 4:3 is a remnant from old movie and TV days. Outside of industrial suppliers like Planar 4:3 LCDs are almost impossible to get.

If text is too small increase the default size in your control panel. All TVs now have HDMI input and connect right to a computer with either DVI, Displayport, or HDMI out. There are adapter cables to go between. Do not use VGA, it is old analog crap and it will not be nearly as clean as the others when viewing text at these higher resolutions.

OH NO.........Here comes the vertical picture video again!:cool:

darryl
02-08-2015, 04:09 PM
When I upgraded to my 24 inch monitor I found that the best looking display resolution would make people look shorter and fatter. I have to constrain the resolution for best readability (aging eyes) so I put up with it. What I'd like is to separate the screen into two parts- one being the correct aspect ratio for virtually everything I look at, then the remainder for the on-screen icons. I don't know if there's a way to do this.

Seems backwards sometimes when I watch a video and find that the top and bottom are cut off- don't get to see the full picture. This is 2015 after all- shouldn't there be an automatic function to display something correctly?

peekaboobus
02-08-2015, 04:25 PM
Yeah, that was one of the clerk's suggestions. My concern then was I might have a width problem.

I'm typing this post on an iPad with the wide screen and low height. Rotating to vertical gives a tall page,but narrow and smaller type.

You can always use more than one screen. You can also rotate any given screen you have for the task at hand.

danlb
02-08-2015, 08:26 PM
When you look at the widescreens, keep in mind that you will get more square inches from a 21 inch widescreen than you will from a 21 inch 4:3 monitor, but the screen height will be reduced considerably. Figure out what height you want before you start. I ended up with a 27 inch screen to have one tall enough for what I wanted to display.


Dan

Juiceclone
02-08-2015, 08:48 PM
some programs will respond with larger (text only) by using ( cntrl + ) keypress .....some...

peekaboobus
02-08-2015, 08:49 PM
There gets to be a point where having one single big monitor ain't worth it and where it makes sense to have multiple simply on cost alone.

I remember transitioning from 4:3 to widescreen annoyed me, but you kinda get used to it. And it frankly looks better. The monitor does. Its also better when watching movies, which are of course widescreen nowadays.

macona
02-08-2015, 10:08 PM
OH NO.........Here comes the vertical picture video again!:cool:

Ill stop posting that video when people learn to take video correctly. :)

RichR
02-09-2015, 12:01 AM
About 5 years ago I needed to replace my 1280 x 1024 CRT monitor. Went to Best Buy and found most of their monitors was that stupid 1366 x 768 resolution.
Anything with a decent vertical resolution was $300 and up. After some searching I found a 1920 x 1080 Acer model #P236H on sale at staples for $120. While
the vertical resolution was important to me I've come to appreciate the extra horizontal resolution.

SteveF
02-09-2015, 12:22 AM
.................

What's the solution? ............

Solved the same problem by going on Ebay and buying a refurbished Dell 1908FP monitor. Very happy with it and have two more sitting in boxes for when this one dies.

Steve

macona
02-09-2015, 12:32 AM
Monoprice had 4k 28" monitors on sale for $350 a couple weeks ago. New monitors are so cheap, and with LED backlights they are lighter, slimmer, and use less power than ever.

LKeithR
02-09-2015, 12:37 AM
When I upgraded to my 24 inch monitor I found that the best looking display resolution would make people look shorter and fatter. I have to constrain the resolution for best readability (aging eyes) so I put up with it...

If people or objects on the screen are "compressed" you're not set to the native resolution of the monitor. If this makes text too small to read easily then click on the advanced button and set the DPI higher. My system is set to 1980 x 1020 (native resolution) but the DPI is 116%. Everything is proportioned correctly but still easy to read. Either that or get some new glasses...:)